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Telecommunications in the United States : Trends and Policies - Leonard Lewin

Telecommunications in the United States

Trends and Policies

By: Leonard Lewin (Editor)

Hardcover Published: 19th September 1981
ISBN: 9780890061046
Number Of Pages: 488

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Biographies of Contributors
Foreword
Introduction
Telecommunications in the Nineties
Telecommunications in the Ninetiesp. 1
Introductionp. 1
At Homep. 1
Making Contactp. 2
Non-Simultaneous Conversationp. 2
Simultaneous Conversationp. 4
Accessing and Entering Datap. 4
Entertainmentp. 8
Household Systemsp. 8
At Workp. 9
The Big Networkp. 10
The Office Deskp. 13
Text and Data Managementp. 16
Teleconferencingp. 19
The Briefcase Officep. 20
System Control Functionsp. 21
Service Bureausp. 22
Hurdlesp. 23
International Concernsp. 23
Regulation and Competitionp. 24
Energy Conservationp. 25
Copingp. 26
Sources of Sressp. 26
Minimizing Stressp. 28
Minimizing Strainp. 29
Maximizing Productivityp. 30
Referencesp. 31
Political and Regulatory Trends
Competition and Deregulation in Telecommunications: The American Experiencep. 37
The Historical Background
Events Before the Creation of the FCCp. 38
FCC Regulationp. 41
The Present Era: Competition Returnsp. 42
Data Communications: A New Public Needp. 42
Terminal Equipment Competitionp. 45
Early Competition in Intercity Transmissionp. 47
"Specialized Common Carriers"p. 49
Domestic Satellite Servicesp. 52
"Value-Added Networks" or Resale Carriersp. 53
The Consequences of the New Competitive Market Structurep. 54
Conclusionp. 58
Referencesp. 58
The Recent Deregulatory Movement at the FCCp. 61
Introductionp. 61
Broadcastingp. 63
Cable Televisionp. 65
Common Carriersp. 66
Recent Domestic Common Carrier Decisionsp. 67
Recent International Common Carrier Decisionsp. 69
Private Radio Servicesp. 70
Frequency Spectrum Deregulationp. 71
Communications Areas That Have Not Been Deregulatedp. 72
Television Broadcastingp. 72
Common Carrierp. 74
Spectrum Deregulationp. 74
Conclusionp. 75
Referencesp. 75
Communications Satellitesp. 85
Introductionp. 85
Intelsatp. 86
Intelsat Policy Towards Non-Intelsat Satellite Systemsp. 88
The United States Policyp. 90
Framing a Policy Towards the Intelsat of the 80'sp. 93
Conclusionp. 94
Referencesp. 95
Trends in Broadcasting
Spectrum Utilization in Broadcastingp. 101
AM Radiop. 101
Early History and the Clear Channel Proceedingp. 101
The 9 kHz Channel Spacing Proposalp. 105
Above 1605 kHzp. 114
Compatible Single Sideband and Single Sidebandp. 114
Low Frequency Broadcastingp. 115
Frequency Modulation (FM)p. 118
Backgroundp. 118
Classes of Stations and the Protected Contourp. 121
Directional Antennas (D.A.'s)p. 122
Effects of Terrain on Propagationp. 124
Adjacent Channel Allocationsp. 125
Reduced Channel Spacingp. 126
SCA and FM Quadp. 127
Noncommercial FMp. 128
Televisionp. 130
Short Historyp. 130
VHF Drop-insp. 132
UHF TV
Low Power TVp. 140
Teletext and Viewdata, and TV Stereop. 151
ITFS and MDSp. 152
Direct Broadcast Satellitesp. 154
Cable TVp. 155
Referencesp. 157
The Prospects for Public Broadcastingp. 165
Introductionp. 165
Technologyp. 168
Overviewp. 168
Implications for Public Broadcastingp. 173
Societal Trendsp. 179
Overviewp. 179
Implications for Public Broadcastingp. 184
Policy and Regulationsp. 189
Overviewp. 189
Implications for Public Broadcastingp. 195
The Public Broadcasting Communityp. 200
Overviewp. 200
System Profilep. 201
Continuing Dilemmasp. 208
Conclusionp. 216
Glossary of Organizationsp. 219
Referencesp. 221
Trends Toward Innovative Applications
The Future of the Newspaper Industryp. 231
Introductionp. 231
Technologyp. 231
Information Gatheringp. 232
Information Processing/Storagep. 232
Disseminationp. 233
Newspaper Industryp. 237
Competitionp. 240
Marketplacep. 244
Conclusionp. 246
Referencesp. 247
The Practice of Teleconferencingp. 251
Introductionp. 251
Types of Teleconferencingp. 251
Purposes of This Chapterp. 252
Topics Coveredp. 253
An Historical Perspectivep. 254
Audioconferencingp. 254
Videoconferencingp. 254
User Researchp. 255
Effectivenessp. 256
Research on Effectiveness and Costsp. 256
An Alternative to the Research Paradigmp. 258
Substitution for Travel and Conservation of Energyp. 259
Teleconferencing in Other Spheresp. 260
Conclusionsp. 261
Audioconferencingp. 262
Audiconferencing Roomsp. 262
Audio Terminalsp. 263
Identification of Speakers and Transmission of Imagesp. 265
Transmissionp. 267
Conference Bridgesp. 268
Some Guidelinesp. 270
Videoconferencingp. 273
Total Servicesp. 273
Forthcoming Servicesp. 274
Videoconferencing Roomsp. 275
Terminal Equipmentp. 276
Transmission Systemsp. 276
Switchingp. 278
Some Guidelinesp. 278
In Conclusionp. 279
Bibliographyp. 280
Network Switchingp. 283
Introductionp. 283
Switching Network Hierarchyp. 284
Switching Technologyp. 286
Digital Switchingp. 288
Factors Affecting Switching Networksp. 290
Governmental Regulationp. 291
Component Technologyp. 291
Satellite Communicationp. 291
Data Communicationp. 291
Office Automationp. 292
Evolving Digital Networksp. 292
Telco Networksp. 292
Specialized Common Carrier (SCC) Networkp. 294
Corporate Networkp. 295
Data Networksp. 298
Service Integration Through Digital Networksp. 299
Networks of the Futurep. 300
Referencesp. 302
EFTS: Requirements for Cryptographic Authenticationp. 305
Cryptography and EFT Systemsp. 305
Abstractp. 305
Introductionp. 306
Security Exposures in EFT Systemsp. 309
Identification and Authentication of System Usersp. 312
Requirements for Personal Identification and Message Authenticationp. 313
Backgroundp. 313
Requirementsp. 320
Advantages of One-way Functions for Personal Verificationp. 332
Special Key Management Requirements for an Authenticated Parameter With Insufficient Number of Combinationsp. 337
Number of Trials Needed to Exhaust the Combinations of PINp. 341
Non-Secure Entry Pointsp. 348
Personal Verification, Off-line Modep. 348
Summary and Conclusionsp. 363
Glossaryp. 363
Referencesp. 364
The Impact of International Trends on US Telecommunications
Law and Policy in International Businessp. 369
Introductionp. 369
Problems and Prospects of Transborder Data Flows in an Interdependent Worldp. 371
Efficiency of International Communications Linksp. 371
Information Products and Servicesp. 373
Transnational Data Flows in the Context of the World Economyp. 374
Role of Computer and Communications in the World -- the Source of Aggravationp. 375
The Emerging Information Barriersp. 375
Traditional Restrictions on Data Flowp. 375
Newer Forms of Data and Information Controlp. 376
Vulnerability of the United Statesp. 388
Outline of a US Communications and Information Policyp. 390
Approaching the Developing Countriesp. 391
Confronting our Concerns with Europe, Canada, and Japanp. 393
Protection of Information in the United Statesp. 395
Toward a World Information Policyp. 399
Summaryp. 399
Referencesp. 401
The Role of Telecommunications in the Development Process: Rural Telecommunications in the Developing Countriesp. 415
The Contextp. 415
The Developing Country Contextp. 415
The Telecommunications Environmentp. 416
Developing Country Concernsp. 418
Contributions of Telecommunicationsp. 418
Benefits of Telecommunications to Developmentp. 418
Hypotheses on Indirect Benefitsp. 420
Rural Telephone Users and Usagep. 422
Constraints on the Import of Telecommunicationsp. 425
Examples of Telecommunications Applications for Developmentp. 426
Social Service Deliveryp. 426
Economic Developmentp. 430
Migrationp. 432
Communications and Transportationp. 433
Contribution to Social Changep. 433
The Potential of Satellitesp. 434
Satellites as Appropriate Technology for Rural Telecommunicationsp. 434
The Alaskan Satellite Systemsp. 435
Approaches to Regional and Domestic Satellite Servicep. 436
The Need to Plan Satellite Systems for Rural Requirementsp. 438
Planning Telecommunications to Support Developmentp. 439
Examples of Integrated Telecommunications Planningp. 439
Planning Principlesp. 440
The Need for Integrated Planningp. 442
Referencesp. 443
Bibliographyp. 446
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780890061046
ISBN-10: 0890061041
Series: Telecommunications Library
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 488
Published: 19th September 1981
Publisher: Artech House Publishers
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 22.9 x 15.2  x 3.1
Weight (kg): 0.88

Earn 647 Qantas Points
on this Book