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Salt Creek - Lucy Treloar

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Published: 1st August 2015
Format: ePUB
$9.99

Some things collapse slow, and cannot always be rebuilt, and even if a thing can be remade it will never be as it was.

Salt Creek, 1855, lies at the far reaches of the remote, beautiful and inhospitable coastal region, the Coorong, in the new province of South Australia. The area, just opened to graziers willing to chance their luck, becomes home to Stanton Finch and his large family, including fifteen-year-old Hester Finch.

Once wealth political activists, the Finch family has fallen on hard times. Cut adrift from the polite society they were raised to be part of, Hester and her siblings make connections where they can: with the few travellers that pass along the nearby stock route - among them a young artist, Charles - and the Ngarrindjeri people they have dispossessed. Over the years that pass, and Aboriginal boy, Tully, at first a friend, becomes part of the family.

Stanton's attempts to tame the harsh landscape bring ruin to the Ngarrindjeri people's homes and livelihoods, and unleash a chain of events that will tear the family asunder. As Hester witnesses the destruction of the Ngarrindjeri's subtle culture and the ideals that her family once held so close, she begins to wonder what civilization is. Was it for this life and this world that she was educated?

PRAISE FOR LUCY TRELOAR
WINNER of the 2014 Commonwealth Short Story Price (pacific Region)
WINNER of the 2013 Writing Australia Unpublished Manuscript Award

Caroline Baum's Review

Treloar's intensely dramatic saga of the downfall of a family settled on the edge of the Coorong is a welcome and fresh take on the well-trodden territory of narratives of colonial hardship.

First of all, she captures the little known beauty of that remote watery place perfectly. Her ability to conjure up its landscape, once shared with the local Narandjeri Aborigines, is a reminder that it is a hard place to farm now, just as it was then. Secondly, the story she tells is utterly compelling and almost mythic, such are the powerful forces unleashed on the family of misguided pastor Finch as told by his endlessly forbearing daughter Hester.

When light skinned Aboriginal boy Tull befriends the Finch family, he is welcomed into their home to share their meals and conversations. But while curious about white culture, Tull remains proud of his own. 'Don't you have any stories?' he asks pointedly one day (They direct him to the Bible). On another, he remarks that he considers all white people ugly. When the Pastor muddies his tribe's waterholes, there is consternation. When he chops down a venerable tree, the question of who owns the land is a source of more discord, a rumbling thunder that must eventually break into a storm.

Treloar calibrates these little moments of tension with impeccable judgment, never overplaying them, though she signposts a grim outcome early on, warning the reader to brace themselves for disaster. Which makes the cumulative impact of this unconventional relationship, balancing trust and mistrust, so devastating when things begin to go wrong. The Pastor is not as principled and high minded as he might wish and has no head for business: all his ventures end in debt, with increasingly terrible consequences. When Tull forms a close bond with Hester's youngest sister Addie, Hester refuses to see what is under her nose. As the family fractures, torn apart by the pastor's blind unbending values and his hypocrisy, Hester tries to hold everything together.

She is a fascinating creation: full of contradictions, overwhelmed by an eldest daughter's sense of duty following her mother's early death while longing to be free and independent. Seemingly uninterested in personal attachment, she fights her own nature and impulses when drawn to a visiting artist explorer. Their moment of romantic intimacy on a shell beach is again understated and restrained, sensual but unsentimental.

The novel builds to a climax that avoids melodrama, but is charged with high emotion and tension to the very last chapter.

About the Author

Lucy Treloar was born in Malaysia and educated in Melbourne, England and Sweden. A graduate of the University of Melbourne and RMIT, Lucy is a writer and editor and has plied her trades both in Australia and in Cambodia, where she lived for a number of years. She has an abiding love for Southeast Asia, a region she retains links with through her editing work, which focuses on English language translations of a diverse range of material including folk tales and modern narrative forms.

Lucy is the 2014 Regional Winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. In 2012 she won the Writing Australia Unpublished Manuscript Award for her first novel, The Things We Tell Ourselves, and went on to be awarded a Varuna Publisher Fellowship for the same work in 2013. In 2011 Lucy was the recipient of a mentorship through the Australian Society of Authors as well as an Asialink Writer's Residency to Cambodia.

Her short fiction has appeared in Sleepers, Overland, Seizure, and Best Australian Stories 2013.

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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Salt Creek
 
4.3

(based on 7 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Engaging characters (6)
  • Deserves multiple readings (5)
  • Page turner (5)
  • Well written (5)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Gift (5)
  • Older readers (5)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Bookworm (3), Everyday reader (3)

Reviewed by 7 customers

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4.0

An excellent story that gets better as it progresses.

By 

from Goulburn NSW 2580

About Me Bookworm

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Engaging Characters
  • Well Written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Older Readers

    Comments about Salt Creek:

    Very well written and interesting. A period and place in Australian history that is not well documented. The characters are authentic and although very ordinary by the end of the book they have become quite extraordinary. The story progresses well, which would be difficult for the author as the pace of life and the lives portrayed, are very slow and mundane. An excellent read that gets better as the story progresses

     
    5.0

    A Great Australian Story

    By 

    from Melbourne

    About Me Everyday Reader

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Engaging Characters
    • Page Turner
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Gift
      • Older Readers
      • Reference
      • Younger Readers

      Comments about Salt Creek:

      This great story tells us of a time and place in Australia when early immigrants were trying to make a life and the racist views held by most people of the time and Aboriginals were often treated badly.

       
      4.0

      A Great Read, well written & descriptive

      By 

      from Bendigo

      About Me Bookworm

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Deserves Multiple Readings
      • Page Turner
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Gift
        • Older Readers
        • Travel Reading

        Comments about Salt Creek:

        This book is well written, provided interesting discussion at Book club.

        (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        Great historical novel

        By 

        from Victor Harbor, SA

        About Me Everyday Reader

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Engaging Characters
        • Page Turner
        • Well Written

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Gift

          Comments about Salt Creek:

          Great story of the early settlers of the Coorong with a factual background

           
          5.0

          A really good read

          By 

          from Adelaide, AU

          About Me Everyday Reader

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Deserves Multiple Readings
          • Engaging Characters
          • Page Turner

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Gift
            • Older Readers
            • Younger Readers

            Comments about Salt Creek:

            Gives a great perspective about white settlement in South Australia and their interaction with the First Australians.

             
            3.0

            Salt of the Earth

            By 

            from Sydney

            About Me Bookworm

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Deserves Multiple Readings
            • Engaging Characters

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Older Readers
              • Reference

              Comments about Salt Creek:

              This is an excellent expose of the early years of colonisation in the southern states, including immigration and the gold rush. The effects on families is rarely covered in such personal detail.

               
              4.0

              Rare subject_colonial South Australia

              By 

              from Barossa South Australia

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Engaging Characters
              • Page Turner
              • Well Written

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Gift

                Comments about Salt Creek:

                Lucy Treloar nails the contradictions/hypocrisy of the nonconformists who colonised South Australia.A wonderful book.

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                ISBN: 9781743533192
                ISBN-10: 1743533195
                Audience: General
                Format: Paperback
                Language: English
                Number Of Pages: 416
                Published: 1st August 2015
                Country of Publication: AU
                Dimensions (cm): 23.3 x 15.4  x 3.1
                Weight (kg): 0.3