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Engineering Your Future : An Australasian Guide - David Dowling

Engineering Your Future

An Australasian Guide

Paperback Published: 19th August 2019
ISBN: 9780730369165
Number Of Pages: 632

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Dowling’s Engineering Your Future: An Australasian Guide, Fourth Edition is used for first year, core subjects across all Engineering disciplines. Building on the previous editions, this text has been updated with new references, while still maintaining a strong and practical emphasis on skills that are essential for problem solving and design. Numerous topical and locally focused examples of projects across engineering disciplines help demonstrate the role and responsibilities of a professional engineer. Themes of sustainability, ethical practice and effective communication are a constant throughout the text.

This full-coloured print with interactive e-text resource has a variety of digital media embedded at the point of learning such as videos and knowledge-check questions to engage students and to help consolidate their learning.

About the authors ix

Preface xii

Part 1 Introduction to engineering 1

Chapter 1 What is engineering? 2

Introduction 3

1.1 What is the role of an engineer? 4

A historical perspective 4

A contemporary perspective 6

1.2 Engineering disciplines 7

Electrical, electronics and telecommunications engineering 9

Mechanical engineering 10

Aerospace and aviation engineering 11

Chemical engineering 12

Civil engineering 12

Environmental engineering 14

Materials engineering 15

Mining engineering 16

Other engineering disciplines 16

1.3 The core skills and attributes of an engineer 17

The Engineers Australia competency framework 18

The Engineering New Zealand framework 20

1.4 Engineering science 23

1.5 The impact of engineering on society and national identity 24

A historical perspective 25

A contemporary perspective 32

Engineering innovations 34

Limitations of engineering 34

1.6 Professionalism, certification and ethical practice in engineering 36

Summary 38

Key terms 38

Exercises 39

Project activity 40

References 40

Acknowledgements 42

Chapter 2 The engineering method 43

Introduction 44

2.1 The engineering method 45

Step 1. Exploring the problem 46

Step 2. Exploring alternative solutions 51

Step 3. Evaluating alternative solutions 53

Step 4. Engineering decision making 54

Step 5. Communicating your recommendation 55

The scientific method 55

2.2 Systems thinking 56

The system boundary 56

2.3 Project management 59

Defining the scope 59

Scheduling 60

Resources 61

Documentation — the design file 61

Time–accuracy trade-off 62

Agile project management 63

Risk management 63

Reporting and documentation 65

Improving practice 66

Life-long learning 67

The engineering method and project management 68

2.4 The life cycle of an engineering asset 68

Design 70

2.5 Critical thinking 73

Critical thinking in an engineering context 74

Moving from having an opinion to taking a position 79

Summary 80

Key terms 81

Exercises 81

Project activity 82

References 82

Acknowledgements 83

Part 2 Engineering in society 84

Chapter 3 Sustainable engineering 85

Introduction 86

3.1 What is ecologically sustainable development (ESD)? 88

Definitions of ESD 89

What is sustainable engineering? 92

Why sustainable engineering? 93

3.2 Strategies for practising sustainable engineering 95

Constraints of sustainable engineering practice 98

Triple bottom line analysis (TBLA) 100

3.3 Environmentally sustainable engineering 100

A global perspective 101

Measuring environmental impacts 103

Life cycle assessment (LCA) 106

3.4 Socially sustainable engineering 110

Promoting intergenerational and intragenerational equity 110

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs 112

Community communication and consultation 113

Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) 114

Engagement techniques 116

3.5 Economically sustainable engineering 117

Costing 117

Economic theories 118

Least cost planning (LCP) 118

Summary 121

Key terms 122

Exercises 123

Project activity 124

References 124

Acknowledgements 126

Chapter 4 Professional responsibility and ethics 128

Introduction 129

4.1 Professional responsibility: standards and professional liability 130

4.2 Work health and safety (WHS) and personal liability 133

Product recall 137

4.3 Engineering ethics 138

The Engineering New Zealand Code of Ethical Conduct 140

The IEEE Code of Ethics 141

Interpreting and applying codes of ethics 142

4.4 Ethical theories 143

Morals and ethics 143

4.5 Common ethical dilemmas in engineering 147

Micro ethics 148

Balancing conflicting interests 151

4.6 Macro ethics 154

4.7 Culture and corruption 155

International business etiquette 156

Corruption and bribery 156

Summary 159

Key terms 160

Exercises 161

Project activity 162

References 162

Acknowledgements 163

Part 3 Professional skills 164

Chapter 5 Self-management 165

Introduction 166

5.1 Understanding self 168

Your personality and attitudes 168

Spatial ability 171

5.2 What motivates you? 172

Sources of inspiration 176

5.3 Developing your skills 178

Developing an inquiring mind 178

5.4 Self-management skills 181

Developing goals and strategies 181

Being responsible 181

Being professional 181

Managing your time effectively 182

5.5 Life-long learning 183

Knowledge frameworks 186

The program framework 187

Managing your learning 189

5.6 Reviewing your performance 196

Levels of reflection 199

Kolb’s Learning Cycle 199

Summary 201

Key terms 202

Exercises 202

Project activity 203

References 203

Acknowledgements 205

Chapter 6 Working with people 206

Introduction 207

6.1 Collaborating with others 208

6.2 Working in groups 214

Establishing a group or team 215

The fundamentals of an effective group 217

The life cycle of a team 220

Improving performance 221

Leadership 223

The benefits of working with others 224

6.3 Meetings 225

The purpose 225

The style 228

The timing 228

The length of the meeting 228

The participants 228

The procedures 228

Your contribution 229

Organising a meeting 229

The role of technology in meetings 232

The downside of working with others 232

6.4 Negotiation 235

The preparation process 235

Approaches to negotiation 236

Outcomes of the negotiation process 238

6.5 Dispute resolution 239

Conflict resolution 240

Summary 241

Key terms 242

Exercises 242

Project activity 243

References 243

Acknowledgements 244

Part 4 Communication 246

Chapter 7 Understanding communication 247

Introduction 248

7.1 What is communication? 249

Key communication skills for engineers 251

7.2 Communication theories and models 252

The communication process 253

A contemporary model 254

Developing a communication model for engineers 255

7.3 Communication contexts 259

Characteristics of communicators 260

Environments 264

Digital communication 266

7.4 Communication methods 270

Channels 270

Communication languages 270

Noise 272

7.5 Communication roles 275

The creator 275

The gatekeeper 278

The consumer 279

Summary 281

Key terms 282

Exercises 282

Project activity 282

References 283

Acknowledgements 284

Chapter 8 Communication skills 285

Introduction 286

8.1 Verbal communication skills 291

Listening 292

Telling 293

Discussing 293

Informal verbal communication 294

8.2 Formal verbal communication 296

Media releases, interviews and publicity 296

Presentations 297

Working to presentation time limits 298

The presentation contexts 299

Content and structure 300

Selecting and preparing media 301

Assembling and rehearsing the presentation 302

Is approval required? 303

Presenting through words and action 303

Answering questions 304

8.3 Written communication skills 304

Reading 304

Writing 305

Wikis 311

Web pages 311

8.4 Visual communication 312

Data 312

Summary 327

Key terms 327

Exercises 328

References 328

Acknowledgements 329

Part 5 Applying the engineering method 330

Chapter 9 Understanding the problem 331

Introduction 332

9.1 Data, information and knowledge 334

Data 334

Information 340

Knowledge 340

Differentiating between data, information and knowledge 341

9.2 Identifying information needs 343

Investigative questioning 343

Categories of information 345

Organising information needs 345

9.3 Locating and retrieving information 348

Typical sources of engineering information 348

Documents 349

Colleagues 351

Stakeholders 353

Geographic information systems 357

Library search tools 359

Internet search tools 360

Developing a search strategy 360

Recording data about information sources 364

9.4 Evaluating information and information sources 364

Evaluating information sources 364

Evaluating information 365

Refining information needs 366

9.5 Managing and using information 366

Integrating information 367

Publishing information 368

A literature review 368

An information management system 368

Controlling access to your information 371

9.6 Citing and referencing 373

Listing and citing print references 373

Listing and citing online references 375

Further information about referencing styles 376

Summary 377

Key terms 378

Exercises 378

Project activity 378

References 380

Acknowledgements 381

Chapter 10 Engineering design 382

Introduction 383

10.1 Design = problem solving 384

Key ideas in the design process 384

10.2 Systems thinking 387

Stakeholders 389

Socio–ecological thinking 392

Whole system design goals 393

Whole system design elements 396

10.3 Generating alternative solutions 404

Five Ws and an H 404

Research 405

Brainstorming 406

Lateral thinking, parallel thinking and the six thinking hats 407

Synectics 410

TRIZ 412

Transforming design through biomimetic thinking and design 414

Summary 417

Key terms 417

Exercises 418

Project activity 418

References 419

Acknowledgements 420

Chapter 11 Evaluating options 422

Introduction 423

11.1 Evaluating solutions — economics 423

Non-economic criteria 424

Qualitative approaches to project evaluation 424

Economic feasibility 425

Sensitivity analysis 431

A more detailed economic model 432

11.2 Technical feasibility 436

11.3 Mathematical modelling in design 438

Power output 439

Maximising energy production 440

Safety 442

Checking 443

Hierarchy of models 443

Summary 445

Key terms 445

Exercises 445

Project activity 446

References 446

Acknowledgements 447

Chapter 12 Engineering decision making 448

Introduction 449

12.1 Engineering decision making 449

Engineering decision support 450

12.2 Complexity 452

Static and dynamic problems 452

12.3 Team-based decision making 453

Effective team environment 455

Dominance and power 455

Diversity in teams 456

Making better decision makers 457

12.4 Reviewing key decision-making criteria 460

Uncertainty 460

Environment 460

Ethics 460

Safety 461

Review and improve — quality assurance 461

12.5 Decision support systems, tools and techniques 463

‘Pen and paper’ decision support tools 463

Computer-based DSS 465

Networked DSS relying on communications technology 467

Intelligent DSS (IDSS) 471

GIS-based DSS 472

Summary 475

Key terms 475

Exercises 476

Project activity 476

References 476

Acknowledgements 477

Chapter 13 Managing engineering projects 478

Introduction 479

13.1 Understanding project management 480

Key factors in project management 481

The Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) and project management standards 481

Project management tools 485

13.2 Planning the stages of an engineering project 488

Using a tool to plan the project stages 489

Planning the stages of the green-star building project 492

Human resources 500

Financial resources 502

13.3 Creating a risk-management plan 503

Dependency risks 504

Design risks 505

Construction risks and safety 505

Internal project risks 507

Long-term risks for the green-star building 508

13.4 Developing a knowledge management plan 508

Document storage, archiving and data mining 509

Sharing knowledge 509

Communities of practice 510

Student knowledge management 511

13.5 Quality management and its relationship to project management 511

Key quality management principles 512

Engineering quality management 513

Quality plans and engineering 514

Quality and the engineering student 515

Quality and student team projects 516

Summary 517

Key terms 517

Exercises 518

Project activity 519

References 519

Acknowledgements 520

Chapter 14 Communicating information 521

Introduction 522

14.1 Three communication contexts 523

The business context 524

The discipline context 524

The public context 525

14.2 Planning a communication 527

Using the PCR model to create effective communication 527

Developing a communication plan for an engineering project 528

Using the model 529

Approach 529

Communication methods, styles, formats and media 531

14.3 Writing in the engineering workplace 531

Practice notes 533

Business correspondence 534

Human resource documents 535

Financial documents 539

Project initiation documents 541

Risk management documents 547

14.4 Technical presentations 553

How can poor presentation be avoided? 553

14.5 Visual communication 555

Drawings, plans and sketches 556

Photography 557

Engineering models 557

Summary 566

Key terms 567

Exercises 567

Project activity 567

References 567

Acknowledgements 568

Part 6 Planning your career 569

Chapter 15 Your engineering future 570

Introduction 571

15.1 Engineering to meet future global challenges 572

Antibiotic resistance 572

Climate change adaptation 576

15.2 Engineering and globalisation 581

Employment in Australia 581

Globalisation 582

Development and post development 583

15.3 Futuristic engineering: emerging fields 584

Industrial biotechnology 585

Materials science 585

Phytomining 586

Biomimicry 587

Animatronics 588

15.4 An engineering career 589

Work to rule — or be inspired to work towards a fulfilling career 590

Management approaches 590

Different types of engineering organisations 591

Efficiency and respect in the workplace 591

Continuing professional development (CPD) 592

Career planning 593

Summary 595

Key terms 595

Exercises 596

Project activity 597

References 597

Acknowledgements 598

Index 600

ISBN: 9780730369165
ISBN-10: 0730369161
Audience: Tertiary; University or College
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 632
Published: 19th August 2019
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd
Country of Publication: AU
Weight (kg): 1.26
Edition Number: 4
Edition Type: Revised

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