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Eleanor & Park - Rainbow Rowell

Paperback Published: 30th April 2013
ISBN: 9781409120544
Number Of Pages: 336
For Ages: 14+ years old

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A moving and funny coming-of-age novel about two misfits falling in love and growing up in 1980s America.

Eleanor is the new girl in town, and she's never felt more alone. All mismatched clothes, mad red hair and chaotic home life, she couldn't stick out more if she tried.

Park is the boy at the back of the bus, Black T-shirts, headphones, head in a book - he thinks he's made himself invisible. But not to Eleanor... never to Eleanor.

Slowly, steadily, through late-night conversations and an ever-growing stack of mix tapes, Eleanor and Park fall in love. They fall in love the way you do the first time, when you're 16, and you have nothing and everything to lose.

Set over the course of one school year in 1986, Eleanor & Park is funny, sad, shocking and true - an exquisite nostalgia trip for anyone who has never forgotten their first love.

WRITE A REVIEW

Amazing

5

Amazing book, couldn't put it down.

Bendigo, AU

true

AMAZING READ

5

This book is one of the best books i have ever read

perth, au

Sweet, fun and easy to read... but...

4

I enjoyed this book, I did. This is the second higest rating I have given a contemporary young adult novel... most erk me a bit. It was well written, beautiful and heart felt. But... it wasn't a page turner for me. I had no issues putting it down and coming back to it later. I wasn't compelled into reading it late into the night. I was contend with the (kind of cliff hanger) ending to leave the lives of Park and Eleanor forever more. I believe this is a book for everyone. Light but thought provoking, and I as I have already said - beautiful.

NSW

true

Eleanor (without, & Park)

3

I had been eyeing this book off for a while before i finally purchased it. The story: I wasn't disappointed but i wasn't in love either. Being told from the third person was different but that didn't make it hard to read. I would love to read a book based on Eleanor's life alone, it was very gripping. I found myself thinking this all the way through this book and it was very hard to get out of my head. The Characters: Eleanor - is a great character. She is very deep, complicated and confusing but i find her extremely like-able as well. Her family are very diverse characters and their story is very gripping through out this novel. I story based on these characters as i said above would be worth reading. Park - was interesting, lacked the depth that Eleanor has, only because there lives are so different. Park's mother - was a funny character to read.

Brisbane, AU

true

Amazing

5

This book was although not testing your mind, it opened your heart to make you feel the pain and the push of the first love that people experience, it makes you feel like you in high school again where you get the chance to fall in love from a distance and feel the young love that people loose.

Sydney au

true

Adorable in all the Right Places

5

Eleanor and Park aren't exactly the two people you would picture to be the protagonists in a contemporary romance novel but the two fit together perfectly. This book is just like life with both it's ups and downs. It's a great read but it may not be something younger people may read as some of the scenes might be a bit confronting.

AU

true

Loved it!!!!

4

I really enjoyed reading this book. It made me laugh out loud as well as shed a tear. I could relate to the 80's references which were often amusing. It is not just a young adult novel, it is a love story that we can all relate to.

New South Wales, Australia

true

Eleanor & Park

4.4 7

100.0

Reminded me not just what it's like to be young and in love, but what it's like to be young and in love with a book -- John Green, author of THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
The pure, fear-laced, yet steadily maturing relationship Eleanor and Park develop is urgent and breathtaking and, of course, heartbreaking, too * BOOKLIST starred review *
'If you haven't come across it before, we very much recommend Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor And Park, which is a gut-punch of a love story that we downloaded and raced through in one train journey.' * EMERALD STREET *
Reminded me not just what it's like to be young and in love, but what it's like to be young and in love with a book * John Green, author of The Fault in our Stars *
A breathless, achingly good read about love and outsiders * Stephanie Perkins, author of Anna and the French Kiss *
Eleanor and Park is completely beautiful. Set in 1986 and full of retro pop culture references, it's a book I want to share with everyone. . . I don't think a single person could read this book and not have their heart melted. * ONCE UPON A BOOKCASE *
Deliriously beautiful . . . My only problem with this book was that I finished it. And I knew I wanted to keep it in my life, always * Jenny Bird for Forever Young Adult *
This sexy, smart, tender romance thrums with punk rock and true love * Gayle Forman, bestselling author of If I Stay *
Rowell keeps things surprising, and the solution - imperfect but believable - maintains the novel's delicate balance of light and dark * Publishers Weekly, starred review *
The pure, fear-laced, yet steadily maturing relationship Eleanor and Park develop is urgent and breathtaking and, of course, heartbreaking, too * Booklist, starred review *
Good luck putting down Eleanor & Park . . . You'll melt at all the tiny moments that add up to a killer romance * Seventeen *
Funny, hopeful, foulmouthed, sexy and tear-jerking, this winning romance will captivate teen and adult readers alike * Kirkus, starred review *
An honest, heart-wrenching portrayal of imperfect but unforgettable love * The Horn Book, starred review *
a perfect book and I recommend it to everyone over the age of thirteen. I don't believe I have conveyed even a fraction of how utterly fantastic it was and all I can do is prompt you to grab a copy and brace yourself * GUARDIAN ONLINE *

1 park XTC was no good for drowning out the morons at the back of the bus. Park pressed his headphones into his ears. Tomorrow he was going to bring Skinny Puppy or the Misfits. Or maybe he’d make a special bus tape with as much screaming and wailing on it as possible. He could get back to New Wave in November, after he got his driver’s license. His parents had already said Park could have his mom’s Impala, and he’d been saving up for a new tape deck. Once he started driving to school, he could listen to whatever he wanted or nothing at all, and he’d get to sleep in an extra twenty minutes. “That doesn’t exist!” somebody shouted behind him. “It so fucking does!” Steve shouted back. “Drunken Monkey style, man, it’s a real fucking thing. You can kill somebody with it.…” “You’re full of shit.” “You’re full of shit,” Steve said. “Park! Hey, Park.” Park heard him, but didn’t answer. Sometimes, if you ignored Steve for a minute, he moved on to someone else. Knowing that was 80 percent of surviving with Steve as your neighbor. The other 20 percent was just keeping your head down.… Which Park had momentarily forgotten. A ball of paper hit him in the back of the head. “Those were my Human Growth and Development notes, dicklick,” Tina said. “I’m sorry, baby,” Steve said. “I’ll teach you all about human growth and development—what do you need to know?” “Teach her Drunken Monkey style,” somebody said. “Park!” Steve shouted. Park pulled down his headphones and turned to the back of the bus. Steve was holding court in the last seat. Even sitting, his head practically touched the roof. Steve always looked like he was surrounded by doll furniture. He’d looked like a grown man since the seventh grade, and that was before he grew a full beard. Slightly before. Sometimes Park wondered if Steve was with Tina because she made him look even more like a monster. Most of the girls from the Flats were small, but Tina couldn’t be five feet. Massive hair included. Once, back in middle school, some guy had tried to give Steve shit about how he better not get Tina pregnant because if he did, his giant babies would kill her. “They’ll bust out of her stomach like in Aliens,” the guy said. Steve broke his little finger on the guy’s face. When Park’s dad heard, he said, “Somebody needs to teach that Murphy kid how to make a fist.” But Park hoped nobody would. The guy who Steve hit couldn’t open his eyes for a week. Park tossed Tina her balled-up homework. She caught it. “Park,” Steve said, “tell Mikey about Drunken Monkey karate.” “I don’t know anything about it.” Park shrugged. “But it exists, right?” “I guess I’ve heard of it.” “There,” Steve said. He looked for something to throw at Mikey, but couldn’t find anything. He pointed instead. “I fucking told you.” “What the fuck does Sheridan know about kung fu?” Mikey said. “Are you retarded?” Steve said. “His mom’s Chinese.” Mikey looked at Park carefully. Park smiled and narrowed his eyes. “Yeah, I guess I see it,” Mikey said. “I always thought you were Mexican.” “Shit, Mikey,” Steve said, “you’re such a fucking racist.” “She’s not Chinese,” Tina said. “She’s Korean.” “Who is?” Steve asked. “Park’s mom.” Park’s mom had been cutting Tina’s hair since grade school. They both had the exact same hairstyle: long spiral perms with tall feathered bangs. “She’s fucking hot is what she is,” Steve said, cracking himself up. “No offense, Park.” Park managed another smile and slunk back into his seat, putting his headphones back on and cranking up the volume. He could still hear Steve and Mikey, four seats behind him. “But what’s the fucking point?” Mikey asked. “Dude, would you want to fight a drunk monkey? They’re fucking huge. Like Every Which Way But Loose, man. Imagine that bastard losing his shit on you.” Park noticed the new girl at about the same time everybody else did. She was standing at the front of the bus, next to the first available seat. There was a kid sitting there by himself, a freshman. He put his bag down on the seat beside him, then looked the other way. All down the aisle, anybody who was sitting alone moved to the edge of their seats. Park heard Tina snicker; she lived for this stuff. The new girl took a deep breath and stepped farther down the aisle. Nobody would look at her. Park tried not to, but it was kind of a train wreck/eclipse situation. The girl just looked like exactly the sort of person this would happen to. Not just new—but big and awkward. With crazy hair, bright red on top of curly. And she was dressed like … like she wanted people to look at her. Or maybe like she didn’t get what a mess she was. She had on a plaid shirt, a man’s shirt, with half a dozen weird necklaces hanging around her neck and scarves wrapped around her wrists. She reminded Park of a scarecrow or one of the trouble dolls his mom kept on her dresser. Like something that wouldn’t survive in the wild. The bus stopped again, and a bunch more kids got on. They pushed past the girl, knocking into her, and dropped into their own seats. That was the thing—everybody on the bus already had a seat. They’d all claimed one on the first day of school. People like Park, who were lucky enough to have a whole seat to themselves, weren’t going to give that up now. Especially not for someone like this. Park looked back up at the girl. She was just standing there. “Hey, you,” the bus driver yelled, “sit down!” The girl started moving toward the back of the bus. Right into the belly of the beast. God, Park thought, stop. Turn around. He could feel Steve and Mikey licking their chops as she got closer. He tried again to look away. Then the girl spotted an empty seat just across from Park. Her face lit with relief, and she hurried toward it. “Hey,” Tina said sharply. The girl kept moving. “Hey,” Tina said, “Bozo.” Steve started laughing. His friends fell in a few seconds behind him. “You can’t sit there,” Tina said. “That’s Mikayla’s seat.” The girl stopped and looked up at Tina, then looked back at the empty seat. “Sit down,” the driver bellowed from the front. “I have to sit somewhere,” the girl said to Tina in a firm, calm voice. “Not my problem,” Tina snapped. The bus lurched, and the girl rocked back to keep from falling. Park tried to turn the volume up on his Walkman, but it was already all the way up. He looked back at the girl; it looked like she was starting to cry. Before he’d even decided to do it, Park scooted toward the window. “Sit down,” he said. It came out angrily. The girl turned to him, like she couldn’t tell whether he was another jerk or what. “Jesus-fuck,” Park said softly, nodding to the space next to him, “just sit down.” The girl sat down. She didn’t say anything—thank God, she didn’t thank him—and she left six inches of space on the seat between them. Park turned toward the Plexiglas window and waited for a world of suck to hit the fan.

ISBN: 9781409120544
ISBN-10: 1409120546
Audience: General
For Ages: 14+ years old
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 336
Published: 30th April 2013
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 19.9 x 13.0  x 2.2
Weight (kg): 0.23
Edition Number: 1

Rainbow Rowell


About the Author


Rainbow Rowell writes books. Sometimes she writes about adults (ATTACHMENTS and LANDLINE). Sometimes she writes about teenagers (ELEANOR & PARK and FANGIRL). But she always writes about people who talk a lot. And people who feel like they're screwing up. And people who fall in love. When she's not writing, Rainbow is reading comic books, planning Disney World trips and arguing about things that don't really matter in the big scheme of things. She lives in Nebraska with her husband and two sons.

Visit Rainbow Rowell's Booktopia Author Page


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