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1912 : The Year the World Discovered Antarctica - Chris Turney

1912

The Year the World Discovered Antarctica

By: Chris Turney

Paperback | 25 July 2012 | Edition Number 1

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The rivalry between Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen is a familiar story; what fewer people know is that, in 1912, five separate teams were exploring beyond the limits of the known world: Scott for Britain, Amundsen for Norway, Mawson for Australasia, Filchner for Germany and Shirase for Japan. The Antarctic discoveries made by these brave explorers enthralled the world and forever changed the way we understand our planet.

Chris Turney tells the story of the frozen continent, the heroic trials endured by its explorers and the lasting legacy for future scientific endeavour. Devoting a chapter to each of the five expeditions, he draws on previously unpublished archival material, framing the narrative with the broader idea of the spirit and excitement of scientific discovery.

Writing in an accessible and engaging style, but with the weight of his thorough research and experience behind him, Chris Turney's 1912 is an entertaining and beautifully illustrated history of an awe-inspiring subject.
Industry Reviews
'The new David Livingstone.' * Saturday Times *
'Hundreds of books have been written about this era of Antarctic exploration, but in telling the gripping, lesser known tales, 1912 is an excellent addition.' * New Scientist *
'What makes this book of particular interest to those familiar with Antarctic exploration literature is the somewhat unusual (and welcome) fact that it was written by a climate scientist. As a historian of the motivation, events and characters of Antarctic exploration, Professor Turney does a workmanlike job. But as a historian of the science behind the aforementioned he is brilliant.' * Good Reading *

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