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Sweet Poison : Why Sugar Makes Us Fat - David Gillespie

Sweet Poison

Why Sugar Makes Us Fat

Paperback

Published: 1st September 2008
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Published: 1st September 2008
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David Gillespie was 40kg overweight, lethargic, sleep-deprived and the father of four, with twins on the way. He knew he needed to lose weight fast, but he had run out of diets – all had failed. After doing some reading on evolution (why weren’t our forebears fat?), David cut sugar – specifically fructose – from his diet.

He immediately started to lose weight, and kept it off. Slim, trim and fired up, David set out to look at the connection between sugar, our soaring obesity rates and some of the more worrying diseases of the twenty-first century, and discovered some startling facts in the process.

Sugar was once such a rare resource that nature decided we didn’t need an off-switch – in other words, we can keep eating sugar without feeling full.

  • In the space of 150 years, we have gone from eating no added sugar to more than a kilogram a week.
  • You would need to run 7km every day of your life just to not put on weight as a result of eating that much sugar.
  • Two decades ago 1 in 14 adult Australians were obese; that figure is now 1 in 5.
  • The ‘natural’ sugar in one glass of unsweetened fruit juice per day for a year is enough to add just over 2.5kg your waistline.
  • The more sugar we eat, the more we want. Food manufacturers exploit our sugar addiction by lacing it through ‘non-sweet’ products, such as bread, sauces, soups and cereals.
About the Author

David Gillespie is a recovering corporate lawyer, co-founder of a successful software company and consultant to the IT industry.

He is also the father of six young children (including one set of twins). With such a lot of extra time on his hands, and 40 extra kilos on his waistline, he set out to investigate why he, like so many in his generation, was fat.

He deciphered the latest medical findings on diet and weight gain and what he found was chilling. Being fat was the least of his problems. He needed to stop poisoning himself.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Sweet Poison
 
4.8

(based on 9 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (7)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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    (0)

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    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Informative (9)
  • Deserves multiple readings (8)
  • Relevant (8)
  • Easy to understand (7)
  • Inspirational (7)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Reference (9)
    • Gift (5)
    • Older readers (4)
    • Special needs (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Everyday reader (6)

    Reviewed by 9 customers

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    5.0

    A book everyone should read!

    By Jacqui

    from Melbourne

    About Me Everyday Reader

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Easy To Understand
    • Informative
    • Inspirational
    • Relevant
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Reference

      Comments about Sweet Poison:

      Excellent - great book about the dangers of sugar.

      Everyone should read.

      Looking forward to reading next 2 books on how to avoid sugar.

      Comment on this review

       
      5.0

      Worth Reading

      By PineapplePete

      from Perth, Western Australia

      About Me Everyday Reader

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Easy To Understand
      • Informative
      • Inspirational
      • Relevant
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Reference

        Comments about Sweet Poison:

        Interesting and thought provoking book - worth a read

        Comment on this review

         
        5.0

        MUST READ

        By Ringo

        from Five Dock

        About Me Bookworm

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Deserves Multiple Readings
        • Informative
        • Relevant

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Gift
          • Reference

          Comments about Sweet Poison:

          This book gives very clear, instructive advice on how to get your health, your nutrition, your weight into the zone. To get on board, you need to understand, and David Gillespie explains it all bery clearly, very well. It's up to date ... unlike much of today's nutrition and health advice which is outdated, wrong and misleading.

          Comment on this review

           
          5.0

          Life changing! Everyone should read it.

          By Country Gal

          from Perth, AU

          About Me Casual Reader

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Deserves Multiple Readings
          • Easy To Understand
          • Informative

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Gift
            • Older Readers
            • Reference
            • Younger Readers

            Comments about Sweet Poison:

            The author has a sense of humour and writes as though he were talking with you, so it's quite easy reading, even the stats and graphs and data.

            What's uncovered is revelation after revelation - astounding and shocking simultaneously, unforgettable and definitely a must read for anyone wanting to be healthy and live a long life.

            Comment on this review

             
            4.0

            Life changing book

            By Kate O'Brien

            from Warrnambool, VIC

            About Me Everyday Reader

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Deserves Multiple Readings
            • Easy To Understand
            • Informative
            • Inspirational
            • Relevant
            • Well Written

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Gift
              • Older Readers
              • Reference
              • Special Needs

              Comments about Sweet Poison:

              This book is a total eye opener, and gave me a lot of "light bulb" moments. The author has also brillianty turned a rather boring and medical topic into a great read.

              Comment on this review

               
              5.0

              Inspiring

              By SuePooh

              from Adelaide

              About Me Everyday Reader

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Deserves Multiple Readings
              • Informative
              • Inspirational
              • Relevant

              Cons

              • Factual
              • Persevere Past Technical

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              Comments about Sweet Poison:

              A little bit technical, but all necessary for truth to come out.

              Comment on this review

               
              5.0

              Eye opener!

              By Sugar free

              from Perth, AU

              About Me Bookworm

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Deserves Multiple Readings
              • Easy To Understand
              • Informative
              • Inspirational
              • Relevant
              • Well Written

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Reference

                Comments about Sweet Poison:

                Great and well written book, full of information even for non-sugar eaters. I followed it with 2 more book of the same author and putting his ideas into life.
                Great work David!

                Comment on this review

                (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                4.0

                Serious subject but easy to read

                By Mollie

                from Maryborough

                About Me Everyday Reader

                Verified Buyer

                Pros

                • Deserves Multiple Readings
                • Easy To Understand
                • Informative
                • Inspirational
                • Relevant
                • Well Written

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                  • Reference
                  • Special Needs

                  Comments about Sweet Poison:

                  Gillespie does not claim to be a nutritionist, but he does cite the latest research and as a lawyer, seeking evidence. And its all here in Sweet Poison.I've bought two extra copies to loan out.

                  Comment on this review

                   
                  5.0

                  The Title says it all

                  By Jenny

                  from Belair S.A

                  About Me Everyday Reader

                  Verified Buyer

                  Pros

                  • A must read for all
                  • Deserves Multiple Readings
                  • Easy To Understand
                  • Informative
                  • Inspirational
                  • Relevant
                  • Well Written

                  Cons

                  • No criticism - Excellent

                  Best Uses

                  • Gift
                  • Older Readers
                  • Reference
                  • Special Needs
                  • Travel Reading
                  • Younger Readers

                  Comments about Sweet Poison:

                  All overweight people need to read this book. Check out what fructose is and what it does. Try to understand or else ask someone to explain more to you. Diabetes can be reversed. Whatever you put in your mouth is going to have some impact on your life. Research! Research! Research!

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                  Introduction

                  I still remember the day Lizzie told me. She had a stunned, almost fearful expression on her face and was unsure of herself in a way I had rarely seen in my wife of 13 years. Our fifth and assumedly last child had just been turned into twins with a wave of the ultrasound wand. In about eight months, we were to become parents of six children under nine years of age. I was about 40kg overweight, and had struggled with my weight for as long as I could remember (except for a brief period during university when I managed to snare Lizzie). I had tried most things, from reducing fat in my diet to not eating to regularly attending the gym and walking the dog. Sometimes I had had limited success (a few kilograms here and there), but it was mostly small backward steps on my ever-accelerating journey to obesity and beyond.

                  With the weight came lethargy and sleeping problems. As any parent could attest, getting enough sleep and having the energy to get through the day is difficult at the best of times, let alone when you’re starting out in the red. I was going to have to be a dad to twin babies and four other young children and I couldn’t see myself managing it carrying 40 extra kilos, feeling lethargic and not sleeping.

                  At the time, the Atkins diet was beginning to take off, with all manner of people touting it as a miracle diet. My uncle had recently undergone heart surgery and was now on Atkins. He had lost a vast amount of weight and was tucking into bacon and eggs every morning for breakfast. This looked like a diet I could really enjoy. I immediately cut out all carbs and, lo and behold, I started losing weight like never before (although I suspect it was because I found it almost impossible to find any food I wanted to eat that did not contain carbohydrates). I spent a couple of weeks feeling like I was starving to death. The weight was coming off but the willpower required to stay on the diet was overwhelming (not to mention the nasty side effects that eliminating fibre from my diet was having). I started to look for alternatives. At first low-GI diets seemed appealing, because they at least allowed you to eat some carbohydrates, but almost no foods were labelled with GI indicators and the maths involved in calculating it myself was beyond me. When chocolate spreads advertised their low-GI levels, I knew that if a food that was half sugar and half fat could earn a low-GI label, the GI calculation was probably almost meaningless for dieters.

                  I had been reading a lot about Charles Darwin’s life and his works on evolution. Darwin’s theories held that all characteristics of modern animals were survival responses developed slowly over millennia. As a result, we (and all animals) are woefully inadequate at dealing with sudden changes in the environment. After reading about these theories, it had occurred to me that my weight gain, and that of most other people in our society, could not possibly be down to a lack of willpower alone (since willpower, or the lack of it, would be an evolved characteristic that could not suddenly have changed in just a few hundred years). In a desperate attempt to find a way to keep up the weight loss without having to stay on the carb-free diet, I started to read up on human metabolism. I quickly came to the conclusion that I would have to learn a whole new vocabulary to understand most of what was being written. However, I was beginning to get the vague feeling that many in the medical profession took for granted a fact that was a complete mystery to the rest of us.

                  Study after study seemed to be pointing to the inescapable conclusion that the fructose part of sugar was fat-inducing in animals, and probably in humans as well. Worse still, it seemed to be complicit in making us want to eat more food in general. Although I found many studies within the medical fraternity backing this line of thought, documents written for the rest of us were almost impossible to find. Those that did exist were, more often than not, rants against sugar in general without any explanation as to why it was bad for us. I immediately changed from eliminating carbs to just eliminating foods with added sugar – at last I could eat bread again. It was impossible to remove all sugar because everything seems to contain it, so I set myself a limit of no more than 10g of sugar in a meal (about the amount of fructose in an apple). This simply meant I no longer ate sweets and biscuits or drank juice and soft drink. The weight loss continued, but the diet was a lot easier to stick to. After a few months, I was so used to not having sugar that it took no willpower at all to refuse it. In fact, on the few occasions I did try chocolates, they tasted unbearably sweet.

                  I’ve now lost the 40kg and, more importantly, no longer worry about weight gain at all. I know that I can eat when I feel hungry and stop eating when I feel full and I will not put on weight. I can eat whatever I like whenever I feel like eating, as long as it does not include sugar. I have no urge to eat when I’m not hungry, I no longer feel lethargic or sleep deprived (other than as would be expected for a father of six), and no unnecessary exercise was involved at all. By far the greatest benefit has been the ability to trust my own body to let me know when to eat and when not to. Its a feeling I’ve never experienced before.

                  People obviously noticed the change in my appearance and energy levels, and asked me what I had done. ‘I stopped eating sugar’ seemed too trite and forwarding them medical journal articles just a little bit over the top, so I decided the story of the sweet poison had to be written in language we all could understand.

                  ISBN: 9780670072477
                  ISBN-10: 0670072478
                  Audience: General
                  Format: Paperback
                  Language: English
                  Number Of Pages: 224
                  Published: 1st September 2008
                  Dimensions (cm): 23.0 x 15.6  x 1.6
                  Weight (kg): 23.0

                  David Gillespie

                  David Gillespie is a recovering corporate lawyer, co-founder of a successful software company and consultant to the IT industry. He is also the father of six young children (including one set of twins). With such a lot of extra time on his hands, and 40 extra kilos on his waistline, he set out to investigate why he, like so many in his generation, was fat. He deciphered the latest medical findings on diet and weight gain and what he found was chilling. Being fat was the least of his problems. He needed to stop poisoning himself.

                  Visit David Gillespie's Booktopia Author Page