+612 9045 4394
 
CHECKOUT
$7.95 Delivery per order to Australia and New Zealand
100% Australian owned
Over a hundred thousand in-stock titles ready to ship
Voices from the Harlem Renaissance - Nathan Irvin Huggins

Voices from the Harlem Renaissance

Paperback Published: 1st January 1995
ISBN: 9780195093605
Number Of Pages: 448

Share This Book:

Paperback

RRP $83.99
$70.25
16%
OFF
Ships in 7 to 10 business days

Earn 141 Qantas Points
on this Book

The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s symbolized black liberation and sophistication--the final shaking off of slavery, in the mind, spirit, and character of African-Americans. It was a period when the African-American came of age, with the clearest expression of this transformation visible in the remarkable outpouring of literature, art, and music. In these years the "New Negro" was born, as seen in the shift of black leadership from Booker T. Washington to that of W.E.B. Du Bois, from Tuskegee to New York, and for some, even to the African nationalism of Marcus Garvey.

In Voices from the Harlem Renaissance, Nathan Irvin Huggins provides more than 120 selections from the political writings and arts of the period, each depicting the meaning of blackness and the nature of African-American art and its relation to social statement. Through these pieces, Huggins establishes the context in which the art of Harlem Renaissance occurred. We read the call to action by pre-Renaissance black spokesmen, such as A. Philip Randolph and W.E.B. DuBois who--through magazines such as The Messenger ("the only radical Negro magazine"), and the NAACP's Crisis--called for a radical transformation of the American economic and social order so as to make a fair world for black men and women. We hear the more flamboyant rhetoric of Marcus Garvey, who rejected the idea of social equality for a completely separate African social order. And we meet Alain Locke, whose work served to redefine the "New Negro" in cultural terms, and stands as the cornerstone of the Harlem Renaissance.

Huggins goes on to offer autobiographical writings, poetry, and stories of such men and women as Langston Hughes, Nancy Cunard, Helen Johnson, and Claude McKay--writings that depict the impact of Harlem and New York City on those who lived there, as well as the youthfulness and exuberance of the period. The complex question of identity, a very important part of the thought and expression of the Harlem Renaissance, is addressed in work's such as Jean Toomer's Bona and Paul and Zora Neale Hurston's Sweat. And Huggins goes on to attend to the voices of alienation, anger, and rage that appeared in a great deal of the writing to come out of the Harlem Renaissance by poets such as George S. Schuyler and Gwendolyn Bennett. Also included are over twenty illustrations by such artists as Aaron Douglas whose designs illuminated many of the works we associate with the Harlem Renaissance: the magazines Fire and Harlem; Alain Locke's The New Negro; and James Weldon Johnson's God's Trombones.

The vitality of the Harlem Renaissance served as a generative force for all New York--and the nation. Offering all those interested in the evolution of African-American consciousness and art a link to this glorious time, Voices from the Harlem Renaissance illuminates the African-American struggle for self-realization.

Industry Reviews

"Huggins' 'Voices from the Harlem Renaissance' is a masterly achievement. It is an indispensable text, one that any teacher or student who is even remotely focusing on the Harlem Renaissance cannot affort to be without. Huggins has culled and compiled the very best that has been thought and said by the giants of the Renaissance, and by those often neglected minor luminaries of that movement."--Earle V. Bryant, University of New Orleans"An excellent collection--all the sources we reach for in one comprehensive volume."--Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College"'Voices' remains the single most important volume about the period."--Joe Benson, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University"Attractive, well-organized. I like the thematic headings."--Celestine Woo, College of New Rochelle, Rosa Parks Campus "Huggins' 'Voices from the Harlem Renaissance' is a masterly achievement. It is an indispensable text, one that any teacher or student who is even remotely focusing on the Harlem Renaissance cannot affort to be without. Huggins has culled and compiled the very best that has been thought and said by the giants of the Renaissance, and by those often neglected minor luminaries of that movement."--Earle V. Bryant, University of New Orleans"An excellent collection -- all the sources we reach for in one comprehensive volume."--Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College"'Voices' remains the single most important volume about the period."--Joe Benson, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University "Huggins' 'Voices from the Harlem Renaissance' is a masterly achievement. It is an indispensable text, one that any teacher or student who is even remotely focusing on the Harlem Renaissance cannot affort to be without. Huggins has culled and compiled the very best that has been thought and said by the giants of the Renaissance, and by those often neglected minor luminaries of that movement."--Earle V. Bryant, University of New Orleans "An excellent collection -- all the sources we reach for in one comprehensive volume."--Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College "'Voices' remains the single most important volume about the period."--Joe Benson, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University "Huggins' 'Voices from the Harlem Renaissance' is a masterly achievement. It is an indispensable text, one that any teacher or student who is even remotely focusing on the Harlem Renaissance cannot affort to be without. Huggins has culled and compiled the very best that has been thought and said by the giants of the Renaissance, and by those often neglected minor luminaries of that movement."--Earle V. Bryant, University of New Orleans "An excellent collection -- all the sources we reach for in one comprehensive volume."--Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College "'Voices' remains the single most important volume about the period."--Joe Benson, Ph.D., North Carolina A& T State University "Huggins' 'Voices from the Harlem Renaissance' is a masterly achievement. It is an indispensable text, one that any teacher or student who is even remotely focusing on the Harlem Renaissance cannot affort to be without. Huggins has culled and compiled the very best that has been thought and saidby the giants of the Renaissance, and by those often neglected minor luminaries of that movement."--Earle V. Bryant, University of New Orleans"An excellent collection -- all the sources we reach for in one comprehensive volume."--Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College"'Voices' remains the single most important volume about the period."--Joe Benson, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University

Introductionp. 3
"New Negro" Radicalismp. 13
From The Messenger: The Negro - A Menace to Radicalismp. 16
A New Crowd - A New Negrop. 18
"If We Must Die"p. 21
Defense of Negro Riotersp. 22
The New Negro - What Is He?p. 23
Africa for the Africansp. 25
Garveyismp. 27
Africa for the Africansp. 35
The Future as I See Itp. 38
Race Pridep. 42
Harlem Renaissance: The Urban Settingp. 43
Harlem Directory from Harlemp. 46
The New Negrop. 47
from Black Manhattanp. 56
My Cityp. 72
Editorial from Harlemp. 72
The Caucasian Storms Harlemp. 74
from A Long Way From Homep. 82
The Topics in New Yorkp. 83
Harlem Shadowsp. 84
City Lovep. 84
from The Big Seap. 90
Esthete in Harlemp. 98
Railroad Avenuep. 98
Smoke, Lilies and Jadep. 99
Blades of Steelp. 110
Harlem Winep. 121
Harlem Reviewedp. 122
A Negro Extravaganzap. 132
Afro-American Identity - Who Am I?p. 135
The Legacy of the Ancestral Artsp. 137
Heritagep. 142
Uncle Jimp. 145
Tableaup. 145
Saturday's Childp. 146
Afro-American Fragmentp. 146
Luani of the Junglesp. 147
Danse Africainep. 153
Negrop. 153
Crossp. 154
I Too Sing Americap. 154
The Negro Speaks of Riversp. 155
from Banjop. 155
Africap. 182
Mulattop. 182
Sonnet to a Negro in Harlemp. 182
Poemp. 183
Bona and Paulp. 184
To A Dark Girlp. 191
Wedding Dayp. 191
Odyssey of Big Boyp. 197
Sweatp. 199
African Diaryp. 207
On Being Blackp. 211
Afro-American Past - History and Folk Traditionp. 216
The Negro Digs Up His Pastp. 217
Song of the Sonp. 221
Fifty Years (1863-1913)p. 222
Characteristics of Negro Expressionp. 224
Shoutingp. 237
The Sermonp. 239
Uncle Mondayp. 244
Sterling Brown: The New Negro Folk-Poetp. 251
Visual Arts: To Celebrate Blacknessp. 259
Aaron Douglas, Sargent Johnson, Richmond Barthe, Augusta Savage, Hale Woodruff, William H. Johnson, Archibald J. Motley, Palmer Hayden
Afro-American Art: Art or Propaganda? High or Low Culture?p. 279
Preface to The Book of American Negro Poetryp. 281
O Black and Unknown Bardsp. 304
The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountainp. 305
Hurtp. 309
The Negro-Art Hokump. 309
Art or Propagandap. 312
Dead Firesp. 313
To John Keats, Poet, at Springtimep. 314
For a Poetp. 315
Yet Do I Marvelp. 315
from Infants of the Springp. 316
The Banjo Playerp. 324
Conversation with James P. Johnsonp. 324
Interview with Eubie Blakep. 336
Christianity: Alien Gospel or Source of Inspiration?p. 341
Go Down Deathp. 342
Spirituals and Neo-Spiritualsp. 344
Black Magdalensp. 347
Simon the Cyrenian Speaksp. 347
Fruit of the Flowerp. 348
She of the Dancing Feet Singsp. 349
Conceptionp. 349
The Suppliantp. 350
A Missionary Brings a Young Native to Americap. 350
Alienation, Anger, Ragep. 351
Brothersp. 352
If We Must Diep. 353
The White Housep. 354
The Lynchingp. 354
Americap. 355
A Black Man Talks of Reapingp. 355
Old Black Menp. 356
Hatredp. 356
Remembering Nat Turnerp. 356
Dream Variationp. 358
Song For a Dark Girlp. 358
Mother to Sonp. 359
Incidentp. 359
From the Dark Towerp. 360
A Southern Roadp. 360
Our Greatest Gift to Americap. 361
Reflections on the Renaissance and Art for a New Dayp. 367
from The Big Seap. 370
Harlem Runs Wildp. 381
A Negro Nation Within the Nationp. 384
Foreword, from Challengep. 390
Dear Reader, from Challengep. 391
Comments, from Challengep. 392
Dear Reader, from Challengep. 392
"Editorial" from The New Challengep. 393
Blueprint for Negro Writingp. 394
For a Negro Magazinep. 402
Spiritual Truancyp. 404
Barrel Stavesp. 406
Widow with a Moral Obligationp. 416
Poemp. 417
Always the Samep. 418
Goodbye, Christp. 419
Long Black Songp. 420
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780195093605
ISBN-10: 0195093607
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 448
Published: 1st January 1995
Country of Publication: AU
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 15.24  x 3.18
Weight (kg): 0.66

Earn 141 Qantas Points
on this Book