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TV or Not TV : Television, Justice, and the Courts - Ronald L. Goldfarb

TV or Not TV

Television, Justice, and the Courts

Paperback Published: 1st January 2000
ISBN: 9780814731314
Number Of Pages: 238

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Goldfarb argues persuasively for cameras in the courtroom, O.J. notwithstanding. He is aware of the problems but believes strongly that the more open a courtroom, the more open and free our society. The challenge, which he describes so well, is to balance the new demanding technology against our traditional dedication to democracy. -- Marvin Kalb, Director, Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy, Harvard University.A tour de force, a one-stop repositiory of the history, facts, and the law of the matter. I plan to plagiarize from it shamelessly. This is an important subject, and Goldfarb's book provides the first comprehensive, in-depth study of the issue. -- Fred Graham, Chief Anchor and Managing Editor, Court TVGoing beyond the ovious controversies of recent years, Goldfarb surveys the role of television in courtrooms with cool but crisp detachement. He brings historical context, legal analysis, and rich experience to bear on the issue, concluding that courts are public institutions that do not belong exclusively to the judges and lawyers who run them. His persuasive argument for greater openness is bound to influence future debate on the topic. -- Sanford J. Ungar, Dean, School of Communication, American UniversityIn the last quarter century, televised court proceedings have gonefrom an outlandish idea to a seemingly inevitable reality. Yet,debate continues to rage over the dangers and benefits to the justicesystem of cameras in the courtroom. Critics contend televisiontransforms the temple of justice into crass theatre. Supportersmaintain that silent cameras portray "the real thing," that withoutthem judicial reality is inevitably filtered through the mind andpens of a finite pool of reporters.Television in a courtroom is clearly a two-edged sword, both invasive and informative. Bringing a trial to the widest possible audience creates pressures and temptations for all participants. While it reduces speculations and fears about what transpired, television sometimes forces the general public, which possesses information the jury may not have, into a conflicting assessment of specific cases and the justice system in general.TV or Not TVargues convincingly that society gains muchmore than it loses when trials are open to public scrutiny anddiscussion.

"A tour de force, a one-stop repositiory of the history, facts, and the law of the matter. I plan to plagiarize from it shamelessly. This is an important subject, and Goldfarb's book provides the first comprehensive, in-depth study of the issue."

-Fred Graham, Chief Anchor and Managing Editor, Court TV

Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. xvii
The Trial of the Centuryp. 1
The Free Press, the Fair and Public Trial: A Constitutional Conundrump. 20
Cameras in the Courts: The Experimentp. 56
A Thing Observed, a Thing Changed: What Is the Impact of Television on Trials?p. 96
The Crucible: Court TVp. 124
Conclusion: TV or Not TVp. 154
Camera Coverage in the Statesp. 189
Summary of State Camera Coverage Rules by the Radio-Television News Directors Associationp. 205
Notesp. 209
Indexp. 231
About the Authorp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780814731314
ISBN-10: 0814731317
Series: Twentieth Century Fund Book
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 238
Published: 1st January 2000
Publisher: New York University Press
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 20.27 x 13.16  x 2.03
Weight (kg): 0.32