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Turning the Tables : Restaurants and the Rise of the American Middle Class, 1880-1920 - Andrew P. Haley

Turning the Tables

Restaurants and the Rise of the American Middle Class, 1880-1920

Paperback

Published: 17th July 2013
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In the nineteenth century, restaurants served French food to upper-class Americans with aristocratic pretensions, but by the twentieth century, even the best restaurants dished up ethnic and American foods to middle-class urbanites spending a night on the town. In Turning the Tables , Andrew Haley examines the transformation of American public dining at the start of the twentieth century and argues that the birth of the modern American restaurant helped establish the middle class as the arbiter of American culture. Early twentieth-century battles over French-language menus, scientific eating, ethnic restaurants, unescorted women, tipping, and servantless restaurants pitted the middle class against the elite. United by their shared preferences for simpler meals and English-language menus, middle-class diners defied established conventions and successfully pressured restaurateurs to embrace cosmopolitan ideas of dining that reflected the preferences and desires of middle-class patrons. Drawing on culinary magazines, menus, restaurant journals, and newspaper accounts, including many that have never before been examined by historians, Haley traces material changes to restaurants at the turn of the century that demonstrate that the clash between the upper class and the middle class over American consumer culture shaped the ""tang and feel"" of life in the twentieth century. |Haley examines the transformation of American public dining at the start of the twentieth century and argues that the birth of the modern American restaurant helped establish the middle class as the arbiter of American culture.

"Haley makes great use of an astonishing collection of sources, such as menus, trade journals, popular magazines, and cartoons, to produce an engaging history that sheds fresh light on the creation and meaning of the American middle class and that will en "Like a good chocolate cake: rich, complex, and satisfying. . . . Haley stakes out bold, original claims. . . . A fine example of solid social and cultural history. . . [which] will help turn the tables on much established scholarship."--"Journal of Soc "A sumptuous dish for anyone interested in middle-class culture of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, as well as an important contribution to the growing historiography around restaurant and food history."--"Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Er Turning the Table is essential reading for anyone wanting to know more about the roots of the American passion for dining out.--Journal of American Studies Turning the Tables is a significant contribution to existing scholarship on class, culture, and consumption.--Journal of Illinois History Haley makes great use of an astonishing collection of sources, such as menus, trade journals, popular magazines, and cartoons, to produce an engaging history that sheds fresh light on the creation and meaning of the American middle class and that will encourage readers to think more deeply about their decision about where to go for dinner.--The Historian Scholars of food, culture, and the middle class will find this book useful . . . . It offers diverse sources and avenues for future exploration while establishing the prominence of middle-class dining culture in urban America.--H-SHGAPE Haley's book reinforces the importance of consumption as a vehicle for class formation and does immeasurable service in exploring restaurants as one of the important sites where this occurred.--American Historical Review A splendid and innovative study. . . . Turning the Tables is an intelligent and well-researched account that significantly contributes to our understanding of the history of restaurant culture in the United States. It is a pleasure to read.--Hospitality & Society Haley's superbly researched study of changes in America's dining habits at the turn into the twentieth century explains much about shifting restaurant tastes in that century, and in ours.--Studies in American Culture Turning the Tables is an engaging read.--LA Weekly blog A sumptuous dish for anyone interested in middle-class culture of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, as well as an important contribution to the growing historiography around restaurant and food history.--Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era Like a good chocolate cake: rich, complex, and satisfying. . . . Haley stakes out bold, original claims. . . . A fine example of solid social and cultural history. . . [which] will help turn the tables on much established scholarship.--Journal of Social History [A] very interesting and useful study of the evolution of public dining in the United States." --Journal of American History A splendid and innovative study. . . . "Turning the Tables "is an intelligent and well-researched account that significantly contributes to our understanding of the history of restaurant culture in the United States. It is a pleasure to read.--"Hospitality & Society" "Turning the Tables" is a significant contribution to existing scholarship on class, culture, and consumption.--"Journal of Illinois History" "Turning the Tables" is an engaging read.--"LA Weekly" blog "Turning the Table" is essential reading for anyone wanting to know more about the roots of the American passion for dining out.--"Journal of American Studies" ""Turning the Tables" is an engaging read."--"LA Weekly" blog ""Turning the Tables" is a significant contribution to existing scholarship on class, culture, and consumption."--"Journal of Illinois History" "Scholars of food, culture, and the middle class will find this book useful . . . . It offers diverse sources and avenues for future exploration while establishing the prominence of middle-class dining culture in urban America."--"H-SHGAPE" "[A] very interesting and useful study of the evolution of public dining in the United States." --"Journal of American History" "Haley's book reinforces the importance of consumption as a vehicle for class formation and does immeasurable service in exploring restaurants as one of the important sites where this occurred."--"American Historical Review" ""Turning the Table" is essential reading for anyone wanting to know more about the roots of the American passion for dining out."--"Journal of American Studies" "Haley's superbly researched study of changes in America's dining habits at the turn into the twentieth century explains much about shifting restaurant tastes in that century, and in ours."--"Studies in American Culture" "A splendid and innovative study. . . . "Turning the Tables "is an intelligent and well-researched account that significantly contributes to our understanding of the history of restaurant culture in the United States. It is a pleasure to read."--"Hospitality & Society" "A splendid and innovative study. . . . Turning the Tables is an intelligent and well-researched account that significantly contributes to our understanding of the history of restaurant culture in the United States. It is a pleasure to read."-"Hospitality & Society" "Haley's innovative and valuable conceptualization of the cosmopolitan restaurant contributes significantly to our understanding of the development of food, class, and culture in the United States."--Jeffrey Pilcher, author of "Food in World History" "Many scholars have viewed the transformation in dining near the turn of the century as an inevitable result of modernizing attitudes, but Andrew Haley successfully argues that these changes instead represent a contest over cultural influence. "Turning the Tables" restores agency to the middle class, providing an insightful exploration of how middle-class consumers exerted collective cultural and economic power that shaped the commercial marketplace and the material culture of dining."--Krishnendu Ray, author of "The Migrant's Table: Meals and Memories in Bengali-American Households" "Haley's book is a lively, engagingly written, and well-researched examination of the origins of dining and the restaurant as we know it. It's a true pleasure to read."--Warren Belasco, author of "Appetite for Change: How the Counterculture Took on the Food Industry"

ISBN: 9781469609805
ISBN-10: 1469609800
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 376
Published: 17th July 2013
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 15.6  x 2.54
Weight (kg): 0.54
Edition Type: New edition