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To See the Buddha : A Philosopher's Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness - Malcolm David Eckel

To See the Buddha

A Philosopher's Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness

Paperback

Published: 1st November 1994
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Malcolm David Eckel takes us on a contemporary quest to discover the essential meaning behind the Buddha's many representations. Eckel's bold thesis proposes that the proper understanding of Buddhist philosophy must be thoroughly religious--an understanding revealed in Eckel's new translation of the philospher Bhavaviveka's major work, "The Flame of Reason." Eckel shows that the dimensions of early Indian Buddhism--popular art, conventional piety, and critical philosophy--all work together to express the same religious yearning for the fullness of emptiness that Buddha conveys.

"Eckel has masterfully drawn on the richness of the Indian language of the senses to shed light on the multiple voices being heard in the philosophical chorus."--Journal of the American Academy of Religion "Eckel has masterfully drawn on the richness of the Indian language of the senses to shed light on the multiple voices being heard in the philosophical chorus... Eckel has given us a truly fascinating way by which to rethink the Buddhist philosophical enterprise... To See the Buddha has done more than 're-vision the Buddha.' It has made some pioneering steps toward appreciating the Buddhist philosophical tradition as a polyphony of pious voices. In the end, we are reminded that Buddhist scholastics envisioned their world with the eyes of devout Buddhists. And Eckel has done much to make that world visible to us."--Daniel Boucher, Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Abbreviationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Palace of Realityp. 9
The Story of the Asuras' Cavep. 11
The Structure of Bhavaviveka's Thoughtp. 22
Philosophy as a Cognitive Questp. 23
The Three-Part Structure of Bhavaviveka's Argumentp. 29
Points of Transition from One Stage in the Argument to Anotherp. 42
Bhavaviveka's Ironical Point of Viewp. 44
The Empty Thronep. 49
Interpreting the Signs of the Buddhap. 51
Hsuan-tsang's Encounter with the Indian Landscapep. 51
The Buddha as a Place Where an Absence Is Presentp. 65
The Diachronic Dimension of the Buddha's Absencep. 73
The Buddha's Previous Vowsp. 74
The Buddha's Manifestationsp. 84
The Buddha's Sustaining Powerp. 90
The Synchronic Dimension of the Buddha's Absencep. 95
The Dharma Bodyp. 97
The Eternal Buddhap. 109
Bhavaviveka's Theory of the Buddhap. 114
The Ultimate Buddha: A Negative Version of the Two-Body Theoryp. 115
The Conventional Buddha: A Positive Version of the Two-Body Theoryp. 122
The Three-Body Theoryp. 125
The Buddha Eyep. 129
Buddhahood and the Language of the Sensesp. 131
Hsuan-tsang's Encounter with the Piratesp. 131
Bhavaviveka and the Philosopher's Eyesp. 137
Structural Similarities Between Different Kinds of Visionp. 141
The Ranking of the Different Sensesp. 147
Translation: Bhavaviveka's Account of the Buddha in Chapter III of The Verses on the Essence of the Middle Way with the Commentary in The Flame of Reasonp. 153
Introductory Notep. 155
The Ultimate Buddhap. 158
The Bodhisattva Pathp. 172
The Conventional Buddhap. 189
Corrections, Alternative Readings, and Emendations of the Textp. 195
Notesp. 197
Bibliographyp. 242
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780691037738
ISBN-10: 0691037736
Audience: Tertiary; University or College
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 276
Published: 1st November 1994
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 23.17 x 15.14  x 1.78
Weight (kg): 0.41