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The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights : A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium - Alexander Leslie Klieforth

The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights

A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium

Paperback Published: 1st January 2005
ISBN: 9780761827917
Number Of Pages: 448

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The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights is a history of liberty from 1300 BC to 2004 AD. The book traces the history of the philosophy and fight for freedom from the ancient Celts to the creation of America, asserting the roots of liberty originated in the radical political thought of the ancient Celts, the Scots' struggle for freedom, John Duns Scotus and the Arbroath Declaration (1320), a tradition that influenced Locke and the English Whig theorists as well as our Founding Fathers, particularly Jefferson, Madison, Wilson and Witherspoon. Author Alexander Klieforth argues the Arbroath Declaration (1320) and its philosophy was the intellectual foundation of the American Revolution and Declaration of Independence (1776). Thus, the work is a revolutionary alternative to the traditional Anglocentric view that freedom, democracy and human rights descended only from John Locke and England of the 1600s. The work is the first historical analysis to locate and document the origin of the doctrine of the "consent of the governed" in the medieval scholar, John Duns Scotus (c.1290s), four centuries before Locke and the English Whigs, and in the evolutionary progress of mankind. The work contends that the Arbroath Declaration (1320) and its philosophy was the intellectual foundation of the American Revolution and Declaration of Independence (1776). After showing the Scottish influence on the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, and the new Federal government, the Braudelian-style work traces the development of Scottish-style freedom and human rights through the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen influenced by Jefferson, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address that transformed Jefferson's Declaration, and Eleanor Roosevelt's role in creating the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the foundation of the modern human rights struggle. More information about this book is available at the authors website www.braveheartsoul.com.

All those interested in the intellectual history of democracy in general, and the development of 'consent' in particular, will find this book to be both important and indispensable. This is a monograph destined to be an integral part of the historiography of Western liberalism, notions of democracy, and the role of individual freedom.--Dr. Michael J. Eula "Amazon.Com "

Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Scotland the Bravep. 1
Ceud Mille Failte!p. 1
Genesisp. 5
The Celts--The People Who Disappeared Into the Shadowsp. 13
The Blossoming of Celtic Culturep. 25
The Thistle Takes Root: Celtic Scotlandp. 37
Veni, Vidi Sed Non Vicip. 51
The Four Founding Peoples and Their Kingdomsp. 61
The Celts and Supernatural Lifep. 79
The Scandinaviansp. 95
The Forging of a Nationp. 107
The Normansp. 117
The House of Canmorep. 133
The Fall of the House of Canmorep. 145
He Who Sows the Wind ...p. 155
... Shall Reap the Whirlwindp. 165
Robert the Brucep. 171
Medieval Scotland and John Duns Scotusp. 177
The Declaration of Arbroathp. 185
Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in Englishp. 190
Text of the Declaration of Arbroath in Medieval Latinp. 194
From the Arbroath Declaration to the Scottish Enlightenmentp. 197
The Scottish Enlightenmentp. 213
The Scottish Invention of America, Thomas Jefferson, The Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independencep. 227
The Scottish Enlightenment in the United Statesp. 229
The Scottish Mind of Thomas Jeffersonp. 241
The Drafting of the Declaration of Independencep. 245
The Text of the First Printing of the Declaration of Independence as Inserted in the Rough Journal of Congressp. 251
An Analysis of the Style and Logic of the American Declarationp. 255
A Comparison of the Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independencep. 263
The Scottish Influence on the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the New Federal Governmentp. 269
The Text of the American Bill of Rightsp. 276
The Controversy: The Comparative Influences of the Celtic-Arbroath Philosophy and the Scottish Enlightenment versus English Philosophy and Law on the Creation of the Declaration of Independence and the American Republicp. 279
The Age of Rights of Mankind: How the Declaration of 1776 Carried World-Wide the Ideology of 1320 to the New Millenniump. 293
The Effect of the Declaration of Independence on Scottish and British Political Reformp. 293
The Declaration of Independence, the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizenp. 297
Abraham Lincoln's Transformation of the Declaration of Independence from Freedom and Liberty to Equalityp. 299
The Text of the Gettysburg Addressp. 301
The Ideology of 1320 and 1776 and the Global Independence and Human Rights Movementsp. 303
The Scots, American and French Declarations and the Third Worldp. 309
And We Return to scotland and England: The Scottish Parliamentp. 311
209 Years Later, the English, the Scots and the Welsh Get an American-Style Bill of Rightsp. 317
Conclusions and the Futurep. 319
Chronology of Celtic, Scottish, English and American Eventsp. 323
Endnotesp. 374
Bibliography and Further Readingp. 401
Indexp. 429
About the Authorsp. 435
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780761827917
ISBN-10: 0761827919
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 448
Published: 1st January 2005
Publisher: UNIV PR OF AMER
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 21.59 x 13.97  x 2.54
Weight (kg): 0.56