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The Portal to Lean Production : Principles and Practices for Doing More with Less - John Nicholas

The Portal to Lean Production

Principles and Practices for Doing More with Less

Hardcover

Published: 2nd November 2005
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The Portal to Lean Production: Principles and Practices for Doing More with Less describes the steps, difficulties, and rewards of implementing lean production. The book moves beyond concepts to address practical matters. The authors provide enough information for you to begin implementing lean production within your organization.
This book applies a model-the Portal to Lean Production-to illustrate principles and practices. The model reappears at the start of every chapter and serves to connect the concepts of each chapter with those in other chapters, and with basic lean production principles.
This volume contains short vignettes that appear in every chapter of actual lean production implementations. Following these real-world examples, the text provides expanded coverage of topics to enable you to learn and apply concepts and principles. The authors enable you to see the context, application, and practical issues associated with lean production concepts and methods before learning details. The vignettes, based upon the work experience of co-author Avi Soni, help connect the concepts and tie them to practical examples.

Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
The Authorsp. xvii
Portal to Lean Productionp. 1
Race with a Moving Finish Linep. 2
Center of the Manufacturing Universep. 2
Customer Expectationsp. 3
Everyone Is in the Racep. 3
Awakening to Lean Productionp. 4
Abandoning Manufacturingp. 4
Lean Is Differentp. 5
Resistance to Leanp. 6
Universal Applicationp. 7
The Portalp. 7
Elements of the Portalp. 7
Application of the Modelp. 9
The Organization of the Bookp. 9
Notesp. 12
The Journey, First Stepsp. 13
Beginningsp. 15
Toyota Production Systemp. 17
Quick History of TPSp. 17
Back, Before Toyotap. 18
Early Automobile Productionp. 19
Visit to the Rougep. 20
Stocking a Supermarketp. 21
Inherent Flexibilityp. 22
Getting Competitivep. 23
Eliminate Wastep. 24
Focused Factories, Cells, and Subplantsp. 25
Automating No Defectsp. 25
A System Takes Formp. 26
Beyond the Factoryp. 27
From Aircraft to Autosp. 28
TPS and the Portal to Lean Productionp. 29
Notesp. 30
First Glimpse of a Manufacturing Cellp. 31
The Indiana Plantp. 32
A New Concept Takes Holdp. 32
Expanding the Conceptp. 33
Cellular Manufacturingp. 35
Workcell Operationp. 35
Output Flexibilityp. 36
Throughput and Qualityp. 37
Myth of Large-Batch Productionp. 38
Small-Batch Productionp. 39
Product Qualityp. 42
One-Piece Flowp. 42
Workcell Sizep. 43
Number of Operatorsp. 43
Number of Operationsp. 43
Applicationsp. 44
Mudap. 44
Notep. 45
Gaining Experience, Broadening the Conceptp. 47
Trap Cellp. 48
Product Family Conceptp. 49
Cell Design for a Product Familyp. 49
Uniform Load for the Product Familyp. 50
Scheduling for Uniform Loadp. 52
Lumpy Schedulesp. 53
Heijunkap. 54
Forced Improvement and Elimination of Wastep. 56
Takt Timep. 56
Process Stabilityp. 57
Implementing the Trap Cellp. 57
Data Gatheringp. 58
Trap Cell Becomes Realityp. 58
Cell Designp. 59
Cycle Timep. 60
Design of Assembly Cellsp. 60
Design of Machining Cellsp. 63
Workcell Capacityp. 66
Productivity Improvementp. 67
Minimum Tolerable CTp. 68
Notesp. 68
Applying the Cell Concept Plantwidep. 69
The Revelationp. 70
Avoiding the Big Machine Bottleneckp. 70
Linked Operationsp. 73
Revelation: Cellularize Everythingp. 75
Linked Workcells and Subcellsp. 76
Coordinated Operationsp. 78
Cell Operator Dutiesp. 79
Cell Equipmentp. 80
Implementationp. 81
The MRP Systemp. 81
Operator Roles and Responsibilitiesp. 81
Trainingp. 82
Incentivesp. 82
Standardsp. 82
Management Supportp. 83
Cell Planning, Design, and Launchp. 83
You Need All This to Be Leanp. 84
Notesp. 85
Building Up Steamp. 87
Kanbanp. 89
Inventory Messp. 90
Adopting Pull Productionp. 90
Time for a New Approachp. 91
Additions to the Systemp. 99
Problems Encounteredp. 99
Lessons Learnedp. 100
Pull-Production Conceptsp. 101
Stockless Productionp. 101
Containers and Cardsp. 102
Process Improvementp. 102
Number of Kanbansp. 103
Mathematical Computationp. 103
Operator-Set Kanban Targetsp. 105
Safety Marginp. 106
Special Cases, Other Issuesp. 107
Signal and Control: Methods and Issuesp. 107
e-Kanbanp. 108
Cardless Kanban Systemsp. 108
Conditionsp. 109
Limitationsp. 111
Visual Managementp. 111
Notesp. 112
Total Productive Maintenancep. 113
Breakdown in the Trap Cellp. 114
Concepts of Maintenance Managementp. 115
Basic Preventive Maintenancep. 115
Maintenance Management Systemp. 116
Operator Ownershipp. 116
Lubricationp. 116
Maintenance Staff Responsibilitiesp. 118
Preventive Maintenancep. 120
Equipment Effectivenessp. 123
Availabilityp. 123
Efficiencyp. 124
Qualityp. 125
Overall Equipment Effectivenessp. 125
Preventive Maintenance Programsp. 126
Normal Operating Conditionsp. 126
Equipment Requirementsp. 127
Cleanliness and Organizationp. 127
Daily Monitoringp. 128
Scheduled Preventive Maintenancep. 128
Information Managementp. 129
Predictive Maintenancep. 132
Operator Involvementp. 133
Total Productive Maintenancep. 134
Equipment Restoration and Redesignp. 134
New Roles for Maintenance Staffp. 135
Eliminate Human Errorp. 135
Implementationp. 136
Notesp. 140
Quick Changeoverp. 141
A Tale of Two Plantsp. 142
Setup Reduction Expertp. 142
New Opportunityp. 143
Setup Reduction Concepts and Techniquesp. 148
Traditional Approachesp. 148
Setup Reduction Methodologyp. 149
SMED Procedurep. 150
Step 1: Distinguish Internal Tasks from External Tasksp. 150
Step 2: Convert Internal Tasks to External Tasksp. 151
Step 3: Improve Every Task in the Setup Procedurep. 152
Step 4: Abolish the Setupp. 153
Techniques for Setup Reductionp. 154
Checklistp. 154
Attachments and Fastenersp. 154
Eliminate Adjustmentsp. 155
Storagep. 156
Cartsp. 157
Material Handlingp. 157
Setup-Reduction Projectsp. 158
Component of a Larger Systemp. 160
Notesp. 160
Standard Workp. 161
Strange-Looking Chartsp. 162
Concept of Standard Workp. 163
Standard Work vs. Work Standardsp. 163
Consistency and Qualityp. 164
Standardization: Precursor for Improvementp. 165
What Is Standard Work?p. 165
Essential Elementsp. 165
Standard Work Definition: Tools and Processp. 167
Critical Role in Kaizenp. 171
Notesp. 175
Focused Factoriesp. 177
Early Focused-Factory Experiencep. 178
Focused-Factory Team Leadersp. 179
A Little Knowledge Can Bep. 180
Clash of the Old and the Newp. 181
Focused Factoryp. 182
Conceptsp. 182
How Small?p. 183
What to Focus On: Focused-Factory Variantsp. 184
Microdesign Issuesp. 187
Flexible Flow Linesp. 187
Flexible U- and S-Linesp. 187
Working Out the Final Layoutp. 188
Clustering Products and Operationsp. 189
Establishing Product and Machine Groupingsp. 189
Cluster Analysisp. 190
Natural Groups, Then What?p. 192
Machine Utilizationp. 194
Focused-Factory Organizationp. 194
Notesp. 197
Customer-Focused Qualityp. 199
Listening to Your Customersp. 200
Customer Complaintp. 200
Statistical Variationp. 203
Experimentationp. 204
Awakeningp. 205
Road to Six Sigmap. 206
Quality Assurance in Lean Productionp. 207
Six Sigma Qualityp. 207
Statistical Interpretationp. 207
Quality Programsp. 209
Quality-Improvement Processp. 210
Training and Certificationp. 210
Quality Ownership, Employee Empowermentp. 211
Problem-Solving Toolsp. 212
The Five-Why Analysisp. 212
Magnificent 7p. 213
Checksheetp. 213
Histogramp. 213
Pareto Analysisp. 213
Scatter Diagramp. 214
Process Flowchartp. 216
Cause-Effect Analysisp. 217
Run Diagramp. 218
Statistical Process Controlp. 220
Control Chartp. 220
Process Stabilityp. 222
Process Capabilityp. 223
Nonstatistical Process Controlp. 224
Quality at the Sourcep. 224
Source Inspectionp. 224
Self-Checksp. 225
Successive and Special Checksp. 225
Self-Check Successp. 225
Andonsp. 226
Pokayokep. 226
Line Stopp. 228
Quality Improvement and TPSp. 228
Notesp. 228
Sustaining Momentump. 231
Employee Involvement, Workplace Organization, Kaizenp. 233
Employee Involvement and Workplace Organizationp. 234
Five Sp. 235
Workplace Organization and Kaizenp. 236
Kaizen Blitzp. 237
Kaizen Projectsp. 239
Kaizen of Main Vent Assembly Cellp. 239
Kickoff Meeting, 9 a.m.p. 240
Value Stream Mappingp. 241
Main Vent Assembly Cell
Walkthrough, 10:30 a.m.p. 243
Mapping the Processp. 244
Few Weeks Later: Current Statep. 245
One Year Later: Future Statep. 247
VSM and the Trap Cellp. 248
Notesp. 249
Supply-Chain Partnershipsp. 251
Learning from Our Suppliersp. 252
Problems with Partsp. 253
Building Bonds with a Supplierp. 254
Building Bonds in the Supply Chainp. 255
Supply-Chain Conceptp. 256
Supplier-Induced Variabilityp. 257
Core Competencyp. 258
The Lean Supply Chainp. 259
Partner Relationshipsp. 260
Purchase Criteriap. 260
Design Inputp. 261
Number of Suppliersp. 261
Partner Agreementp. 262
Pricep. 262
Qualityp. 262
Deliveryp. 263
Order/Replenishmentp. 263
Point-of-Use Deliveryp. 266
Little Customer, Big Supplierp. 267
This Can Be Difficultp. 268
Notesp. 269
The Lean Enterprisep. 271
Product Designp. 272
Paddle-Arm Problemp. 272
Robust for Manufacturep. 273
Robust for Usagep. 275
Lean Product Developmentp. 276
Process Engineeringp. 277
Purchasing Functionp. 277
Evolution of Purchasingp. 278
Role of Purchasing in Lean Productionp. 278
Requirements Specificationp. 278
Supplier Assessment, Selection, and Contractingp. 280
Managing Supplier Relationshipsp. 280
Developing Supplier Capabilitiesp. 280
Representing Suppliersp. 280
Accounting and Financep. 281
Standard Cost Accountingp. 281
Activity-Based Costingp. 282
Measuring Performancep. 283
Sales and Marketingp. 286
Smooth Out Demandp. 286
Encourage Customer Involvement in Product Designp. 286
Narrow the Product Mixp. 287
Human Resourcesp. 287
Skill Development and Trainingp. 287
Incentivesp. 288
Union Involvementp. 288
Hiring Criteriap. 288
Layoffsp. 289
Notesp. 290
Lean Culture Transformationp. 291
Organization Culturep. 292
Roots of Lean Productionp. 293
Lean Culturep. 293
Influencing Cultural Changep. 294
Resistance to Changep. 295
Why Is Cultural Change Important?p. 295
Role of Managementp. 296
Mission: Constancy of Purposep. 296
Understand Processesp. 296
Model Lean Behaviorp. 297
Sustaining Momentump. 298
Lesson 1. Lean Championp. 298
Lesson 2. Knowledgeable Assistancep. 298
Lesson 3. Planp. 298
Lesson 4. Trainp. 299
Lesson 5. Display Goals and Performancep. 299
Lesson 6. Disciplinep. 299
Lesson 7. Employee Trustp. 299
Lesson 8. Role of Line Managementp. 300
Lesson 9. Early Demonstration of Successp. 300
Lesson 10. Combat Lethargyp. 300
Lesson 11. Patience and Impatiencep. 300
Lesson 12. Commitment from the Topp. 301
Lesson 13. Understanding the True Value of Leanp. 301
Lesson 14. Do Not Waitp. 301
Transformational Leadershipp. 302
Mistakesp. 303
Closing Thoughtsp. 304
Notesp. 305
Glossaryp. 307
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780849350313
ISBN-10: 084935031X
Series: Resource Management
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 344
Published: 2nd November 2005
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 15.9  x 2.54
Weight (kg): 0.64
Edition Number: 1