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The Infinities : Vintage International - John Banville

The Infinities

Vintage International

Paperback

Published: 8th February 2011
Ships: 7 to 10 business days
7 to 10 business days
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On a languid midsummer's day in the countryside, old Adam Godley, a renowned theoretical mathematician, is dying. His family gathers at his bedside: his son, young Adam, struggling to maintain his marriage to a radiantly beautiful actress; his nineteen-year-old daughter, Petra, filled with voices and visions as she waits for the inevitable; their stepmother, Ursula, whose relations with the Godley children are strained at best; and Petra's "young man"--very likely more interested in the father than the daughter--who has arrived for a superbly ill-timed visit.
But the Godley family is not alone in their vigil. Around them hovers a family of mischievous immortals--among them, Zeus, who has his eye on young Adam's wife; Pan, who has taken the doughy, perspiring form of an old unwelcome acquaintance; and Hermes, who is the genial and omniscient narrator: "We too are petty and vindictive," he tells us, "just like you, when we are put to it." As old Adam's days on earth run down, these unearthly beings start to stir up trouble, to sometimes wildly unintended effect. . . .
Blissfully inventive and playful, rich in psychological insight and sensual detail, "The Infinities" is at once a gloriously earthy romp and a wise look at the terrible, wonderful plight of being human--a dazzling novel from one of the most widely admired and acclaimed writers at work today.

"From the Hardcover edition."

"Dazzling. . . . Banville is, without question, one of the great living masters of English-language prose. The Infinities is a dazzling example of that mastery." --Los Angeles Times

"Unforgettable, beautifully written. . . . Banville is frequently compared to such masters as Beckett and Nabokov, and for years his books have been among the most haunting, beautiful and downright strange in contemporary literature. . . . If Banville is capable of writing an unmemorable sentence, he has successfully concealed the evidence." --The Washington Post

"If The Infinities has the bones of a novel of ideas, it's fleshed out and robed as a novel of sensibility and style. . . . Sumptuous." --The New York Times Book Review

"Ingenious. . . . [The Infinities deals with] mortality, creativity, and the possibility of making something truly new in a world that seems increasingly exhausted morally, politically, and spiritually." --The New Yorker

"Entrancing. . . . Banville achieves real depth in this alternately grave and bawdy exploration of the nature of time, the legacy of grief, and the costs and sources of inspiration." --San Francisco Chronicle

"Seamlessly sophisticated fiction. . . . [Banville's] agility is abundantly evident. . . . It takes expert writerly effort to toss each little thunderbolt with such seeming ease." --The New York Times

"Mesmerizing. . . . The Infinities is rife with mischief, as well as godly/authorial omniscience, irony and wordplay, but what warms and anchors it is its humanity." --The Miami Herald

"Intriguing, complex, and ultimately elusive, The Infinities manages, through divine sleight of mind, to bring glimmers of possibility to its dark characters: as such, it is a novel for our hopeless times." --Claire Messud, Irish Times

"A Midsummer Night's Dream of a story. . . . Pure pleasure." --Minneapolis Star-Tribune

"Spellbinding." --Financial Times

"Banville's best and brightest work. . . . Masterful." --Bookforum

"Banville may have surpassed himself with the brilliance and introspection of his writing in [this] mythic novel." --The Buffalo News

"Characteristically gorgeous." --Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

"Like Nabokov, Banville has a wide-ranging intellect and a rather godlike view of the power of fiction--and, like Nabokov, he's got the goods to back it up. The Infinities is an inventive melding of myth and realism, a sly and poignant tale of lust and loss, but above all it is a joy to read for the sheer beauty of its language." --St. Petersburg Times

"A major work of Shakespearean imagination, Banville's fifteenth novel is among his best." --Austin American-Statesman

"Banville is a glorious stylist whose prose holds sustaining pleasures. . . . You keep turning the pages just to gather more of these bouquets. But when Banville waxes philosophic he's even better; he's heartbreakingly poignant. . . . [A] rich and strange novel, as ambitious in its reach as it is delightful to read. This god has outdone himself." --Newsday "The Infinities borders on the divine--mysterious, warm-hearted, and elegant, with traces of such literary gods as Vladimir Nabokov and fellow Irishman Oscar Wilde. What Banville shares with those two, along with the ability to write great prose, is a sense of mischief--here grown to cosmic proportions." --Boston Phoenix "The Infinities is a Beethoven string quartet of a novel. It deals with huge ideas--plenty of them--and in doing so, breaks new ground in its own medium. . . . A masterpiece of a book." --Daily Telegraph (London)

John Banville

John Banville also writes under the pseudonym Benjamin Black. CLICK HERE to see his Author Page

Irish novelist John Banville was born in Wexford in Ireland in 1945. He was educated at a Christian Brothers' school and St Peter's College in Wexford. He worked for Aer Lingus in Dublin, an opportunity that enabled him to travel widely. He was literary editor of the Irish Times between 1988 and 1999. Long Lankin, a collection of short stories, was published in 1970. It was followed by Nightspawn (1971) and Birchwood (1973), both novels.

Banville's fictional portrait of the 15th-century Polish astronomer Dr Copernicus (1976) won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction) and was the first in a series of books exploring the lives of eminent scientists and scientific ideas. The second novel in the series was about the 16th-century German astronomer Kepler (1981) and won the Guardian Fiction Prize. The Newton Letter: An Interlude (1982), is the story of an academic writing a book about the mathematician Sir Isaac Newton. It was adapted as a film by Channel 4 Television. Mefisto (1986), explores the world of numbers in a reworking of Dr Faustus.

The Book of Evidence (1989), which won the Guinness Peat Aviation Book Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction, Ghosts (1993) and Athena (1995) form a loose trilogy of novels narrated by Freddie Montgomery, a convicted murderer. The central character of Banville's 1997 novel, The Untouchable, Victor Maskell, is based on the art historian and spy Anthony Blunt. Eclipse (2000), is narrated by Alexander Cleave, an actor who has withdrawn to the house where he spent his childhood. Shroud (2002), continues the tale begun in Eclipse and Prague Pictures: Portrait of a City (2003), is a personal evocation of the magical European city.

John Banville lives in Dublin. The Sea (2005) won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. In The Sea an elderly art historian loses his wife to cancer and feels compelled to revisit the seaside villa where he spent childhood holidays. His latest novel is The Infinities (2009).

Visit John Banville's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780307474391
ISBN-10: 0307474399
Series: Vintage International
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 273
Published: 8th February 2011
Publisher: Vintage
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 21.59 x 13.97  x 1.91
Weight (kg): 0.22