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Strategic Software Production with Domain-orientated Reuse : Computing Library - Paolo Predonanzi

Strategic Software Production with Domain-orientated Reuse

Computing Library

Hardcover Published: 31st August 2000
ISBN: 9781580531047
Number Of Pages: 424

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This volume offers a systematic approach to creating and positioning reusable software components and products. The Domain Analysis methodology described in the book shows how to use commonality and variability analysis in studying the market, co-ordinating with competitors, engineering new products, and minimizing risks. Software engineers and network designers should learn how to analyze and define a "space of variability" on which new products can be based and positioned. Additionally, the book helps readers to understand how software products compare, how to market software reuse products, how to co-ordinate release of a product to profit from a competitor's release and pool groups of users, and how to maximize long-term marketing plans for your product. Real-world case studies illustrate applications of the methodologies described in the book, including "Sherlock", a method that binds domain analysis to market analysis and planning.

Prefacep. xv
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Domain analysis and engineering: the definitionp. 9
DAandE and competition in the domainp. 11
Typical skills in DAandEp. 12
An overview of Sherlockp. 15
A brief tour of the phasesp. 16
Domain definitionp. 18
Domain characterizationp. 20
Domain scopingp. 22
Domain modelingp. 23
Domain framework developmentp. 24
Deliverablesp. 25
The Webmetrics examplep. 27
Reading pathsp. 28
Domain definitionp. 29
Preparation of the domain vocabularyp. 31
Collection of information and identification of domain bordersp. 31
Classification of the collected informationp. 35
Why domain definition?p. 36
The Webmetrics example for domain definitionp. 37
DD1: Domain vocabularyp. 37
DD2: Classified information on the domainp. 39
DD3: Definition of feasible domain, strategic domain, and current domainp. 42
DD4: Feasibility analysisp. 42
Logging the evolution of domain definitionp. 43
Domain characterizationp. 45
Product valuep. 45
Installed bases and network externalitiesp. 48
Compatibilityp. 51
Connecting installed basesp. 53
Object-oriented representation of compatibilityp. 57
Standardsp. 58
Convertersp. 60
Timing effectsp. 61
User flowsp. 62
Competing using pricesp. 68
Remarks on domain characterizationp. 69
Deliverables of domain definitionp. 70
The Webmetrics example for domain characterizationp. 71
DC1: Diagrams of valuep. 71
DC2: Description of installed basesp. 73
DC3: Tables of compatibilityp. 74
DC4: User flowsp. 75
DC5: Market segments and pricing policyp. 76
DC6: Plan for development of new productsp. 77
Logging the evolution of domain characterizationp. 77
Domain scopingp. 79
Identification of variation points and variants: interaction with domain characterization and domain modelingp. 80
Variation points and variants: the variability spacep. 82
External and internal variation pointsp. 83
Representation and projections of the variability spacep. 85
Variability space as a container of productsp. 87
Variability space as a container of strategiesp. 90
Attributes and conditions of attributesp. 91
Strategy cost, conditional cost, and valuep. 94
More remarks on strategiesp. 95
A brief summary of the concepts introduced so farp. 96
Strategic choices: formalizing the problemp. 97
Strategic choices: our approachp. 100
The first groupp. 100
The second groupp. 103
Comments on strategic planningp. 106
Final remarks on domain scopingp. 106
Deliverables of domain scopingp. 107
The Webmetrics example for domain scopingp. 108
DS1: Variability space, attributes of the products in the domain, and related constraintsp. 108
Definition of product strategiesp. 110
DS3: Identification of the product strategies to develop in the futurep. 112
Logging the evolution of domain scopingp. 114
Domain modelingp. 115
Product use case modelp. 117
Product analysis modelp. 121
Domain use case modelp. 121
Identification of variation points and variantsp. 125
Domain analysis modelp. 126
Implementing the variation pointsp. 130
Deliverables of domain modelingp. 131
The Webmetrics example for domain modelingp. 131
DM1: Product use case modelsp. 132
DM2: Product analysis modelsp. 132
DM3: Domain use case modelp. 136
DM4: Domain analysis modelsp. 138
DM5: Traces between use cases and analysis classesp. 138
Logging the evolution of domain modelingp. 141
Domain framework developmentp. 143
Relationship between the framework and the product-specific partp. 144
Callbacks and callback loopsp. 147
Passive and reactive frameworksp. 148
Frameworks in Sherlockp. 149
Architecture of the domain framework and of the derived productsp. 150
Package projectionp. 151
Class projectionp. 151
Object projectionsp. 152
Functional projectionp. 153
Process projectionp. 154
Component projectionp. 154
Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 154
Browsable and searchable catalog of componentsp. 155
Guidelines for developing applications using the frameworkp. 156
Commonality and variability: implementation issuesp. 157
Coding the framework: language-specific issuesp. 159
The Webmetrics example for domain framework developmentp. 160
DF1: Definition of the nature of the domain frameworkp. 161
DF2: Architecture of the domain frameworkp. 161
DF3: Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 171
DF4: Browsable and searchable catalog of components in the domain frameworkp. 172
DF5: Guidelines for developing applications using the frameworkp. 172
Logging the evolution of domain framework developmentp. 174
Case study 1: Sherlock applied to WaveRider Communications, Inc.p. 177
Backgroundp. 177
Domain definitionp. 178
Classified information on the domainp. 178
Definition of feasible, strategic, and current domainsp. 183
Feasibility analysisp. 183
Domain vocabularyp. 185
Domain characterizationp. 190
Diagrams of valuep. 190
Description of the installed basep. 192
Tables of compatibilityp. 193
User flowsp. 194
Market segments and pricing policyp. 196
Plan for development of new productsp. 196
Domain scopingp. 196
Variability space, attributes of product in the domain, and related constraintsp. 196
Definition of product strategiesp. 202
Selection of product strategies to develop in the futurep. 203
Domain modelingp. 204
Product use case models for LMS 170p. 204
Product use case models for LMS 270p. 205
Product domain models for LMS 170p. 206
Product domain models for LMS 270p. 208
Domain use case modelp. 211
Domain analysis modelp. 219
Domain framework developmentp. 223
Definition of the nature of the domain frameworkp. 223
Architecture of the domain frameworkp. 224
Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 234
Browsable and searchable catalog of components in the domain frameworkp. 235
Guidelines for developing applications using the frameworkp. 236
Conclusionsp. 237
Case study 2: Sherlock in a neural network domainp. 241
Introductionp. 241
Domain definitionp. 242
DD1: Domain terminologyp. 242
DD2: Classified information on the domainp. 243
DD3: Definitions of the feasible, strategic, and current domainsp. 246
DD4: Feasibility analysisp. 247
Domain characterizationp. 248
DC1: Diagrams of valuesp. 248
DC2: Description of installed basep. 250
DC3: Tables of compatibilitiesp. 250
DC4: User flowp. 252
DC5: Market segments and pricing policyp. 253
DC5: Plan of development of new productsp. 255
Domain scopingp. 255
DS1: Variability space, attributes of products in the domain, and related constraintsp. 255
DS2: Definition of product strategiesp. 257
DS3: Identification of product strategies to develop in the futurep. 261
Domain modelingp. 262
DM1: Product use case modelp. 263
DM2: Product analysis modelp. 264
DM3: Domain use case modelp. 265
DM4: Domain analysis modelp. 265
Domain framework designp. 269
DF1: Definitions of the nature of the domain frameworkp. 269
DF2: Architecture of the domainp. 269
DF3: Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 270
DF4: Browsable and searchable catalog of the components in the domain frameworkp. 270
DF5: Guidelines to develop applications using the componentsp. 270
Conclusionp. 275
Case study 3: Sherlock applied to Novatel Wireless, Inc.p. 277
Domain definitionp. 277
DD1: Domain vocabularyp. 277
DD2: Classified information on the domainp. 279
DD3: Definition of the feasible, strategic, and current domainsp. 283
DD4: Feasibility analysisp. 284
Logging the evolution of domain definitionp. 284
Domain characterizationp. 284
DC1: Diagrams of valuesp. 284
DC2: Description of the installed basep. 286
DC3: Tables of compatibilityp. 286
DC4: User flowsp. 287
DC5: Market segments and pricing policyp. 288
DC6: Plan for development of new productsp. 288
Logging the evolution of domain characterizationp. 289
Domain scopingp. 289
DS1: Variability space, attributes of the products in the domain, and the related constraintsp. 289
DS2: Definition of product strategiesp. 291
DS3: Selection of the product strategies to develop in the futurep. 294
Logging the evolution of domain scopingp. 295
Domain modelingp. 295
DM1: Product use case modelp. 295
DM2: Product analysis modelp. 296
DM3: Domain use case modelp. 297
DM4: Domain analysis modelp. 297
DM5: Traces between use cases and analysis classesp. 298
Logging the evolution of domain modelingp. 298
Domain framework developmentp. 298
DF1: Definition of the nature of the domain frameworkp. 298
DF2: Architecture of the domain frameworkp. 298
DF3: Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 305
DF4: Browsable and searchable catalog of components in the domain frameworkp. 305
DF5: Guidelines for developing applications using the componentsp. 307
Logging the evolution of domain framework developmentp. 309
Case study 4: Sherlock in a military domainp. 311
Domain definitionp. 311
DD1: Domain vocabularyp. 311
DD2: Classified information about domainp. 313
DD3: Definitions of the feasible, strategic, and current domainsp. 318
DD4: Feasibility analysisp. 318
Logging evolution for domain definitionp. 319
Domain characterizationp. 319
DC1: Diagrams of valuesp. 319
DC2: Description of the installed basep. 323
DC3: Tables of compatibilityp. 324
DC4: User flowsp. 325
DC5: Market segments and pricing policyp. 325
DC6: Plan for development of new productsp. 326
Logging evolution for domain characterizationp. 327
Domain scopingp. 327
DS1: Variability space, attributes of the products in the domain, and related constraintsp. 327
DS2: Definition of the product strategiesp. 329
DS3: Identification of product strategies to be developed in the futurep. 333
Logging evolution for domain scopingp. 334
Domain modelingp. 334
DM1: Product use case modelp. 334
DM2: Product analysis modelp. 337
DM3: Domain use case modelp. 337
DM4: Domain analysis modelp. 339
DM5: Traces between use cases and analysis classesp. 339
Logging evolution for domain modelingp. 340
Domain framework developmentp. 343
DF1: Definition of the nature of the domain frameworkp. 343
DF2: Architecture of the domain frameworkp. 343
DF3: Documentation of components in the domain frameworkp. 345
DF4: Browsable and searchable catalog of components in the domain frameworkp. 352
Conclusionsp. 355
More and better products?p. 357
Managers and developers get along wellp. 358
Sherlock at workp. 359
UML basicsp. 363
Graphs and textp. 364
Layers of models in UMLp. 365
Packagesp. 367
Diagramsp. 368
Static structure diagramsp. 368
Use case diagramsp. 369
Sequence diagramsp. 370
Extensions of UMLp. 371
Review of existing methodologies for domain analysis and engineeringp. 373
Survey of existing DAandE methodologiesp. 374
Comments on the existing methodologiesp. 375
Components, frameworks, and architecturesp. 377
About the Authorsp. 381
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9781580531047
ISBN-10: 1580531040
Series: Computing Library
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 424
Published: 31st August 2000
Publisher: Artech House Publishers
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 23.4 x 15.6  x 2.3
Weight (kg): 0.77
Edition Number: 2

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