+612 9045 4394
 
CHECKOUT
Robots, Androids and Animatrons : 12 Incredible Projects You Can Build - John Iovine

Robots, Androids and Animatrons

12 Incredible Projects You Can Build

Paperback

Published: 19th November 2001
Ships: 7 to 10 business days
7 to 10 business days
RRP $65.99
$54.50
17%
OFF

Bring a robot to life without programming or assembly language skills

There's never been a better time to explore the world of the nearly human. With the complete directions supplied by popular electronics author John Iovine, you can:


- Build your first walking, talking, sensing, thinking robot
- Create 12 working robotic projects, using the fully illustrated instructions provided
- Get the best available introduction to robotics, motion control, sensors, and neural intelligence
- Put together basic modules to build sophisticated 'bots of your own design
- Construct a robotic arm that responds to your spoken commands
- Build a realistic, functional robotic hand
- Apply sensors to detect bumps, walls, inclines, and roads
- Give your robot expertise and neural intelligence

You geteverything you need to create 12 exciting robotic projects using off-the-shelf products and workshop-built devices, including a complete parts list. Also ideal for anyone interested in electronic and motion control, this cult classic gives you the building blocks you need to go practically anywhere in robotics.

This title is unique in its coverage of a wide variety of robot types: walker robots, solar-ball robots, acrobots, underwater bots, and robotic hands. No prior technical skills are required. Following an introduction to robotics and AI, the text discusses the various components of robot construction: power systems, drive systems, sensors, intelligence, speed controllers, and even neural networks. The project examples tie it all together, and finally tips show readers how to create bots of their own design. Library Journal 20021101 From New Literature Section: Build your own walking, talking, thinking robot with the projects covered in this book on amateur robotics. Providing you with the building blocks of electronics and motion control, the book enables you to construct a robotic arm that reponds to your spoken command, put together basic modules to create sophisticated robot designs of your own, and more. First-time robot-builders and advanced hobbyists can complete these projects without programming or assembly language skills. Poptronics 20020401

Introductionp. xvii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
In the beginningp. 1
Why build robots?p. 2
Purpose of robotsp. 2
Explorationp. 3
Industrial robots--going to workp. 7
Design and prototypingp. 7
Hazardous dutyp. 8
Maintenancep. 8
Fire-fighting robotsp. 9
Medical robotsp. 9
Nanotechnologyp. 10
War robotsp. 11
Robot warsp. 11
Civilian uses for robotic dronesp. 12
Domesticp. 12
What we haven't thought of yet--the killer applicationp. 12
More usesp. 13
Artificial life and artificial intelligencep. 15
Artificial intelligencep. 15
Evolution of consciousness in artificial intelligencep. 16
Is consciousness life?p. 17
Artificial lifep. 17
Nanorobotics--are we alive yet?p. 18
A little historyp. 18
Greater than Ip. 19
The locked cagep. 19
Biotechnologyp. 20
Neural networks--hype versus realityp. 20
What are neural networks?p. 20
What is artificial intelligence?p. 21
Using neural networks in robotsp. 22
Tiny netsp. 22
Neural-behavior-based architecturep. 22
Powerp. 23
Photovoltaic cellsp. 23
Building a solar enginep. 24
Batteriesp. 28
Battery powerp. 28
Battery voltagep. 29
Primary batteriesp. 29
Secondary batteriesp. 30
In generalp. 33
Building a NiCd battery chargerp. 33
Building a solar-powered battery chargerp. 38
Fuel cells--batteries with a fuel tankp. 38
If not now, when?p. 39
Movement and drive systemsp. 41
Air musclesp. 41
Applicationsp. 41
How air muscles workp. 42
Nitinol wirep. 43
Solenoidsp. 45
Rotary solenoidsp. 46
Stepper motorsp. 47
Stepper motor circuitp. 48
Servo motorsp. 48
DC motorsp. 54
DC motor H-bridgep. 55
Pulse-width modulationp. 57
Sensorsp. 59
Signal conditioningp. 60
Comparator examplep. 60
Voltage dividerp. 61
Light sensors (sight)p. 64
Photoresistivep. 64
Photoresistive light switchp. 64
Photoresistive neuronp. 66
Photovoltaicp. 67
Infraredp. 67
DTMF IR communication/remote control systemp. 70
DTMFp. 70
Machine visionp. 80
Body sensep. 81
Direction--magnetic fieldsp. 82
Testing and calibrationp. 83
Computer interfacep. 83
1525 electronic analog compassp. 84
GPSp. 85
Speech recognitionp. 85
Sound and ultrasonicsp. 86
Ultrasonic receiver sectionp. 87
Ultrasonic transmitter sectionp. 88
Arranging the ultrasonic sensorsp. 90
Touch and pressurep. 90
Piezoelectric materialp. 91
Switchesp. 92
Bend sensorsp. 92
Heatp. 93
Pressure sensorp. 94
Smellp. 94
Humidityp. 97
Testing sensorsp. 97
Building a tester robotp. 97
Improving the tester robotp. 99
Intelligencep. 101
Microchip's PIC microcontrollerp. 101
Why use a microcontroller?p. 102
PIC programming overviewp. 102
Software installationp. 105
Writing the BASIC language programp. 105
Using the compilerp. 105
Programming the PIC chipp. 106
First BASIC programp. 106
Programming the PIC chipp. 110
The EPIC programming board softwarep. 110
Testing the PIC microcontrollerp. 113
Winkp. 114
Troubleshooting the circuitp. 114
PICBASIC Pro Compilerp. 115
New IDE featuresp. 115
Software installationp. 117
First PICBASIC Pro programp. 117
The EPIC programmer and CodeDesignerp. 118
Winkp. 119
Moving forward--applicationsp. 120
Reading switches--logic lowp. 120
Reading switches--logic highp. 121
Reading comparatorsp. 123
Reading resistive sensorsp. 123
Servo motorsp. 126
Servo sweep programp. 127
Fuzzy logic and neural sensorsp. 127
Fuzzy logicp. 128
Building a fuzzy logic light trackerp. 130
Parts list for programming the microcontrollerp. 139
Parts list for fuzzy light tracker and neural demonstrationp. 140
Speech-controlled mobile robotp. 143
Programmable speech-recognition circuitp. 144
Learning to listenp. 144
Speaker-dependent and speaker-independent speech recognitionp. 145
Recognition stylep. 145
Building the speech-recognition circuitp. 146
Interface circuitp. 152
Walkie-talkiesp. 153
Acoustic couplingp. 153
Training and controlling the mobile robotp. 154
New board featuresp. 155
General speech-recognition interfacing circuitp. 155
Connection to speech kitp. 157
How it worksp. 157
Creating a more useful outputp. 159
Operationp. 159
Improving recognitionp. 160
Match environment and equipmentp. 160
Speech-controlled robotic armp. 162
Parts list for speech-recognition circuitp. 162
Parts list for interface circuitp. 162
Behavioral-based robotics, neural networks, nervous nets, and subsumption architecturep. 165
Robotics pioneerp. 166
Fours modes of operationp. 168
Observed behaviorp. 168
Building a Walter tortoisep. 168
Programp. 183
Program 1p. 184
Program 2p. 185
Behaviorp. 186
Parts list for the Walter tortoise robotp. 188
Suppliersp. 189
Building an intelligent photovore robotp. 189
Behaviorp. 191
Adding behavior (feeding)p. 192
Still more behavior (resting)p. 192
Emergent behaviorp. 193
BEAM roboticsp. 194
BEAM competitionp. 194
Electronic flotsamp. 196
Competitionsp. 196
Getting the BEAM guidep. 198
Join inp. 199
Telepresence robotp. 201
What's in a name?p. 201
What is telepresence?p. 201
System substructurep. 202
A little on R/C modelsp. 203
Eyesp. 204
Constructionp. 205
2.4-GHz video systemp. 206
Driving via telepresencep. 207
Talkp. 208
Adding realistic car controlsp. 208
Improving the telepresence systemp. 208
Stereo-visionp. 208
Digital compassp. 210
Rumble interfacep. 210
Tilt interfacep. 210
Greater video rangep. 211
More modelsp. 212
Parts list for the telepresence robotp. 212
Mobile platformsp. 213
Stepper motorsp. 214
Stepper motor construction and operationp. 215
Resolutionp. 215
Half steppingp. 215
Other types of stepper motorsp. 217
Real worldp. 217
UCN-5804p. 219
Using the UCN-5804p. 220
Connecting a wheel to a stepper motor shaftp. 222
Building a stepper microcontrollerp. 222
First stepper circuitp. 222
Stepper motorsp. 223
First test circuit and programp. 224
Second PICBASIC programp. 225
Troubleshootingp. 228
Using a PIC microcontroller and a UCN-5804 stepper motor ICp. 229
Parts list for the stepper motor controllerp. 232
Walker robotsp. 233
Why build walkers?p. 233
Imitation of lifep. 233
Six legs--tripod gatep. 233
Creating a walker robotp. 234
Three-servo walkerp. 235
Functionp. 236
Constructionp. 238
Mounting the servo motorsp. 240
Linkagep. 240
Center servo motorp. 241
Electronicsp. 243
Microcontroller programp. 244
PICBASIC programp. 245
Parts list for the walker robotp. 246
Solar-ball robotp. 247
Gearboxp. 249
Robot constructionp. 250
Electronicsp. 253
How it worksp. 253
Putting it all togetherp. 255
Locomotionp. 255
Advancing the designp. 255
Adding higher behavior modulep. 256
Parts list for the solar-ball robotp. 256
Electronicsp. 257
Underwater botsp. 259
Dolphins and tunasp. 259
Swimming with foilsp. 261
Paddles and rowsp. 261
What have we learned so far?p. 261
Jumping inp. 262
Submarinep. 262
Swimming by use of a tailp. 263
The robotic android fishp. 267
Learn more about itp. 267
Parts list for robotic fishp. 267
Aerobotsp. 269
Lighter-than-air aircraft backgroundp. 270
Blimp systemsp. 270
The Robot Group--Austin, Texasp. 271
WEB Blimp--University of California, Berkeleyp. 271
Designing telepresence blimps as avatars and golemsp. 272
To the moonp. 272
Blimp parametersp. 273
The blimp kitp. 274
Heliump. 274
Helium versus hydrogenp. 274
Sizep. 275
Constructionp. 276
CCD camerap. 276
TV transmitterp. 276
Radio-control systemp. 277
Parts list for the blimpp. 280
Internet accessp. 280
Robotic arm and IBM PC interface and speech controlp. 281
Robotic armp. 283
Basic motor controlp. 284
PC interface constructionp. 286
How the interface worksp. 288
Connecting the interface to the robotic armp. 289
Installing the Windows 95 programp. 289
Using the Windows 95 programp. 290
Creating script filesp. 291
Animatronicsp. 291
Limitationsp. 291
Finding homep. 292
Connecting manual control to interfacep. 293
DOS-level keyboard programp. 294
Speech control for robotic armp. 294
Programming the speech-recognition interfacep. 296
Parts list for the PC interfacep. 297
Parts list for the speech-recognition interfacep. 297
Android handp. 299
Advantages of the air musclep. 300
Usesp. 300
How the air muscle worksp. 300
Components of the air muscle systemp. 301
Attaching the air muscle to mechanical devicesp. 304
Using the air pump adaptorp. 304
Have a Coke or Pepsip. 305
Building the first demo devicep. 307
Building the second mechanical devicep. 310
IBM interfacep. 311
BASIC programp. 312
More airp. 313
Safety firstp. 314
Android handp. 314
The thumbp. 319
Going furtherp. 321
Parts list for the air musclep. 321
Parts list for the IBM interfacep. 322
Suppliersp. 323
Indexp. 325
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780071376839
ISBN-10: 0071376836
Series: Electronics
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 270
Published: 19th November 2001
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education - Europe
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 23.4 x 19.3  x 2.0
Weight (kg): 0.69
Edition Number: 2
Edition Type: Revised