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Molecules and Morphology in Evolution : Conflict or Compromise? - Colin Patterson

Molecules and Morphology in Evolution

Conflict or Compromise?

By: Colin Patterson (Editor)

Paperback

Published: 7th September 1987
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This book reviews the phylogenetic data derived from molecular methods and from classical morphology, and analyses the contribution each can make to the study of evolution. Molecular biology and traditional areas of evolutionary biology such as morphology have not enjoyed a particularly happy marriage. Molecular biologists have the advantages of modernity, high technology, and visibility: their results often seem to represent the cutting edge of science, superseding and outmoding what went before. Nevertheless, this book shows that the partnership between those who study morphology and those who study molecules is alive and well: reconciliation is possible, necessary and inevitable because the problems involved in reconstructing the history of life do not change, whatever the source of the data. In eight chapters, leading exponents of molecular and morphological methods explore phylogeny, starting with hominoids, the most thoroughly studied group, then working outwards through the vertebrates, and ending at the level of the prokaryote and eukaryote kingdoms. Theoretical problems are also covered, including the concepts of homology, the molecular clock and neutral or 'non-Darwinian' evolution. The book concludes with an example in laboratory mice where the reliability of different methods for determining phylogeny can be tested against a known genealogy.

Contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
From morphology to molecules
Homology and analogy
Phenetics and cladistics
Molecular sequences: homology becomes a statistical concept
Orthology and paralogy
Introns and exons: partial homology
Pseudogenes - hidden paralogy; foreign genes - xenology
Clocks and neutrality
Molecules versus morphology
References
Aspects of hominoid phylogenyp. 23
Introduction
The nature of the evidence
Early hominoid branching points
Human-ape divergence
General conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Molecular and morphological analysis of high-level mammalian interrelationshipsp. 55
Introduction
Myoglobin
Alpha crystallin A chain (lens protein)
General remarks on molecular cladograms based on sequence data
Palaeontology and comparative anatomy
Conclusions
Acknowledgements
References
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Avian phylogeny reconstructed from comparisons of the genetic material, DNAp. 95
Introduction
DNA-DNA hybridization
Results
The passerine birds
Discussion
References
Appendix
Tetrapod relationships: the molecular evidencep. 123
Introduction
Recent opinions on tetrapod interrelationships Molecular evidence
Maximum likelihood estimation of evolutionary trees
Conclusion
References
Pattern and process in vertebrate phylogeny revealed by coevolution of molecules and morphologiesp. 141
Introduction
Early fossil history of vertebrates
Disputes concerning genealogical relationships
Principles of molecular phylogenetics
Genealogical reconstruction strategy
Molecular picture of vertebrate cladistics
Molecular picture of Darwinian evolution of vertebrates
Outlook
Acknowledgements
References
Appendix
Macroevolution in the microscopic worldp. 177
Introduction
Bacterial evolution
Molecular chronometers and the measurement of evolutionary rates
Evolutionary characteristics of bacterial ribosomal RNAs
General considerations
References
Divergence in inbred strains of mice: a comparison of three different types of datap. 203
Introduction
Methods and materials
Results
Discussion
Acknowledgements
References
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780521338608
ISBN-10: 0521338603
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 240
Published: 7th September 1987
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 22.8 x 15.2  x 1.4
Weight (kg): 0.36