+612 9045 4394
 
CHECKOUT
Media,Technology and Society : A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet - Brian Winston

Media,Technology and Society

A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet

Paperback Published: 16th April 1998
ISBN: 9780415142304
Number Of Pages: 392

Share This Book:

Paperback

RRP $143.99
$107.35
25%
OFF
or 4 easy payments of $26.84 with Learn more
Ships in 10 to 15 business days

How are media born? How do they change? And how do they change us?
"Media Technology and Society" offers a comprehensive account of the history of communications technologies, from the printing press to the internet. Brian Winston argues that the development of new media, from the telegraph and the telephone to computers, satellite and virtual reality, is the product of a constant play-off between social necessity and suppression: the unwritten law by which new technologies are introduced into society only insofar as their disruptive potential is limited. Winston's fascinating account examines the role played by individuals such as Alexander Graham Bell, Gugliemo Marconi, John Logie Baird, Boris Rozing and Charles Babbage, and challenges the popular myth of the present-day "information revolution."

"In this widely researched history of communication and information technologies, from the printing press to the Internet, Brian Winston argues that the development of new media forms, from the telegraph and the telephone to computers, satellites, and virtual reality, is the product of a constant play-off between social necessity and suppression: the unwritten law by which new technologies are introduced into society only insofar as their disruptive potential is limited. Winston's monograph asks difficult questions: How are new media born? How do they change? Moreover, how do they change us? He concludes that the information Revolution is not revolutionary. Current technologies are merely elaborating a process of change begun much earlier, and historical study of these alterations offers many insights into the potential effects of today's latest developments." -American Association for History and Computing Prize for the Best Book of 1998 "Winston's notes should not be missed; they contain historical nuggets and comment on the main text. A valuable history illuminated with a unique and insightful model applicable to other fields. Highly recommended as a replacement for the earlier volume." -"Choice, 3/99 "With an impressive breadth of scholarship, the author makes an effective case...this book should provide a healthy counterweight to the hyperbole that currently surrounds talk and writing about the 'Information Age'." -"American Studies

List of figuresp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
A storm from paradise -- technological innovation, diffusion and suppressionp. 1
The Information Revolution as hyperbolep. 1
Modelling changep. 3
'Invention'p. 9
Propagating sound at considerable distances
The telegraphp. 19
Scientific competence to ideation: static electrical telegraphsp. 19
Prototypes, necessity and 'invention': dynamic electrical telegraphsp. 22
Suppression and diffusion: owning the telegraphp. 26
Before the speaking telephonep. 30
Scientific competence: the telephonep. 30
Ideation: speech transmitted by electricityp. 36
Prototypes: electrical speaking telephones before 1877p. 43
The capture of soundp. 51
Supervening necessity: the telephone and the officep. 51
'Invention': creating the telephone to orderp. 54
Suppression and diffusion: the telephone after 1900p. 57
'Inventing' a spin-off: the recordp. 60
The vital spark and fugitive pictures
Wireless and radiop. 67
Scientific competence to ideation: from spark to wirelessp. 67
Necessity, diffusion and suppression: ironclads and telegramsp. 70
'Invention': from wireless telegraphy to radiop. 74
Ideation and necessity: the idea of broadcastingp. 75
Suppression and diffusion: valves/tubes, FM and cartelsp. 78
Living with radiop. 84
Mechanically scanned televisionp. 88
Scientific competence: light and electricityp. 88
Ideation: faxes and 'fugitive pictures'p. 91
Prototypes: mechanical scanningp. 94
Electronically scanned televisionp. 100
Invention I: electronic scanningp. 100
Invention II: alternative electronic scanningp. 107
Necessity and suppression: entertainmentp. 111
Suppressing television: 1935-48p. 114
Suppressing television: 1948 to the mid-1950sp. 119
Television spin-offs and redundanciesp. 126
Spin-offs and redundancies: VCRs, CDs et al.p. 126
Redundancy: 1125-line analogue televisionp. 140
Inventions for casting up sums very pretty
Mechanising calculationp. 147
Scientific competence I: 'thinking machines'p. 147
Scientific competence II: Babbagep. 155
Scientific competence III: calculators -- mechanical to electricalp. 158
Prototypes: electro-mechanical calculatorsp. 162
The first computersp. 166
Electronic prototypes I: ENIAC and 'the firing table crisis'p. 166
Electronic prototypes II: Colossus vs. Enigmap. 170
Ideation: 'the store'p. 174
Supervening social necessity: the H-Bombp. 178
'Invention': incunabulap. 181
Suppressing the main framesp. 189
No buyersp. 189
No languagesp. 199
No babiesp. 203
The integrated circuitp. 206
Suppression (cont.): ignoring solid state electronicsp. 206
Scientific competence: cat's whiskers to transistorp. 207
Transistors vs. valvesp. 216
Ideation and prototype: the integrated circuitp. 220
'Invention': the microprocessorp. 224
The coming of the microcomputerp. 227
Suppression revisited: the computer industryp. 227
Diffusion and spin-offs: PC productionp. 232
The intricate web of trails, this grand system
The beginnings of networksp. 243
The first wired networkp. 243
The telephone networkp. 248
Networks and recording technologiesp. 261
Broadcasting networksp. 261
Digression: broadcasting networks and recording technologiesp. 264
Pre-satellite international radio linksp. 271
International wired linksp. 273
Communications satellitesp. 276
Scientific competence and ideation: the communications satellitesp. 276
Prototypes: low and medium orbitsp. 280
Social necessity and invention: the geostationary satellitep. 282
Suppression: the international networkp. 288
The satellite erap. 295
Domestic satellitesp. 295
Direct broadcast satellitesp. 298
Cable televisionp. 305
The return of the wire: cable televisionp. 305
The impact of domestic satellitesp. 311
The impact on broadcast televisionp. 315
The Internetp. 321
Prototypes and ideation: computer networksp. 321
From necessity to diffusion: ARPANET to Internetp. 328
The pile of debris -- from the Boulevard des Capucins to the Leningradsky Prospectp. 337
Notesp. 343
Referencesp. 351
Indexp. 361
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780415142304
ISBN-10: 041514230X
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 392
Published: 16th April 1998
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 15.88  x 2.54
Weight (kg): 0.7
Edition Number: 1