+612 9045 4394
 
CHECKOUT
Kierkegaard's Writings : Kierkegaard's Writings, II, Volume 2: The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures v. 2 - Soren Kierkegaard

Kierkegaard's Writings

Kierkegaard's Writings, II, Volume 2: The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures v. 2

Paperback

Published: 16th February 1992
Ships: 3 to 4 business days
3 to 4 business days
RRP $99.00
$77.25
22%
OFF

A work that "not only treats of irony but is irony," wrote a contemporary reviewer of "The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates." Presented here with Kierkegaard's notes of the celebrated Berlin lectures on "positive philosophy" by F.W.J. Schelling, the book is a seedbed of Kierkegaard's subsequent work, both stylistically and thematically. Part One concentrates on Socrates, the master ironist, as interpreted by Xenophon, Plato, and Aristophanes, with a word on Hegel and Hegelian categories. Part Two is a more synoptic discussion of the concept of irony in Kierkegaard's categories, with examples from other philosophers and with particular attention given to A. W. Schlegel's novel "Lucinde" as an epitome of romantic irony.

"The Concept of Irony" and the "Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures" belong to the momentous year 1841, which included not only the completion of Kierkegaard's university work and his sojourn in Berlin, but also the end of his engagement to Regine Olsen and the initial writing of "Either/Or."

"The definitive edition of the Writings. The first volume ... indicates the scholarly value of the entire series: an introduction setting the work in the context of Kierkegaard's development; a remarkably clear translation; and concluding sections of intelligent notes."--Library Journal

Frontmatter, pg. iContents, pg. vHistorical Introduction, pg. viiThe Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates, pg. 1Theses, pg. 5Introduction, pg. 9I. The View Made Possible, pg. 13II. The Actualization of the View, pg. 157III. The View Made Necessary, pg. 198APPENDIX. Hegel's View of Socrates, pg. 219Introduction, pg. 241Observations for Orientation, pg. 246The World-Historical Validity of Irony, the Irony of Socrates, pg. 259Irony after Fichte, pg. 272Irony as a Controlled Element, the Truth of Irony, pg. 324Addendum. NOTES OF SCHELLING'S BERLIN LECTURES, pg. 331Key to References, pg. 413Original Title Pages of The Concept of Irony, pg. 416Original First Page (manuscript) of Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures, pg. 420Selected Entries from Kierkegaard's Journals and Papers Pertaining to The Concept of Irony, pg. 423Acknowledgments, pg. 457Collation of The Concept of Irony in the Danish Editions of Kierkegaard's Collected Works, pg. 461NOTES, pg. 465BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE, pg. 597INDEX, pg. 599

ISBN: 9780691020723
ISBN-10: 0691020728
Series: Kierkegaard's Writings (Paperback)
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 664
Published: 16th February 1992
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 21.44 x 13.84  x 3.79
Weight (kg): 0.75
Edition Number: 2