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Judaic Religion in the Second Temple Period : Belief and Practice from the Exile to Yavneh - Lester L. Grabbe

Judaic Religion in the Second Temple Period

Belief and Practice from the Exile to Yavneh

Hardcover Published: 3rd August 2000
ISBN: 9780415212502
Number Of Pages: 448

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The developments in Judaism which occurred during the Second Temple period (c. 550 BC to 100 AD) were of great importance for the nature of Jewish religion in later centuries, yet few studies have examined the era in full. Now Lester L. Grabbe's lucid and accessible volume provides a much-needed encyclopedic study and holistic interpretation of the period.
Topics examined include:
* views about God and the spirit world
* the temple and priesthood
* scripture and synagogue
* the main religious sects and revolutionary movements
* eschatology and messianism
* magic and predicting the future
* religion in the Jewish diaspora
* converts and 'Godfearers'.
With an extensive, up-to-date bibliography, plus numerous helpful cross-references, summaries and syntheses, this book is essential reading for scholars and students of the history of Jewish religion. It will also be of great value as a reference tool.

Industry Reviews

'... this is a very important reference work ... and can be trusted as a guide to the latest thinking in the vast area of study, having a breadth of discussion and extensive bibliography that makes it almost like an encyclopedia of Jewish religion in the period.' - Jason Bray, Journal of Theological Studies

'Because of the extremely well organised structure and lucid argument of the book, as well as the many references to recent studies, the work is bound to be a very important reference tool and handbook for those studying early Judiac religion.' - Review of Books

Prefacep. xiii
List of abbreviationsp. xvi
Introductionp. 1
Aims of this studyp. 1
Definitionsp. 3
Religionp. 3
Judaicp. 5
Second Temple periodp. 5
Apologia pro historia meap. 6
Some technical mattersp. 9
Chronological surveyp. 11
Persian period (539-333 BCE)p. 13
Major sourcesp. 13
Books of Ezra and Nehemiahp. 13
Haggai, Zechariah, Malachip. 15
Joelp. 17
Jonahp. 17
Isaiah 56-66p. 18
Books of Chroniclesp. 19
Proverbsp. 21
Jobp. 22
Estherp. 23
Ruthp. 25
Song of Songsp. 25
The P Documentp. 26
Archaeology, papyri, and coinsp. 28
Synthesisp. 29
Early Greek period (333-200 BCE)p. 37
Major sourcesp. 37
Hecateus of Abderap. 37
Zenon papyrip. 39
The story of the Tobiadsp. 40
Ethiopic Enoch (1 Enoch) and the Book of Giantsp. 41
Qohelet (Ecclesiastes)p. 42
Tobitp. 44
The edicts of Antiochus IIIp. 46
Demetrius the Chronographerp. 48
The Septuagint translation of the Biblep. 49
Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus)p. 50
Synthesisp. 52
Later Greek period and Hasmoneans (200-63 BCE)p. 59
Major sourcesp. 59
1 and 2 Maccabeesp. 59
Danielp. 60
1 Enoch 83-105p. 62
Book of Jubileesp. 63
Sibylline Oracles 3-5p. 64
Judithp. 65
1 Baruchp. 66
Qumran scrollsp. 67
Fragmentary Jewish Writers in Greekp. 70
Pseudo-Hecateusp. 73
Testament of Moses (Assumption of Moses)p. 74
Letter of (Pseudo-) Aristeasp. 75
Synthesisp. 76
Under Roman rule (63 BCE-70 CE)p. 84
Major sourcesp. 84
Psalms of Solomonp. 84
3 Maccabeesp. 86
Wisdom of Solomonp. 86
Pseudo-Phocylidesp. 88
Philo of Alexandriap. 89
Josephusp. 92
Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum (Pseudo-Philo)p. 94
Adam and Eve literaturep. 95
Similitudes (Parables) of Enoch (1 Enoch 37-71)p. 97
Sibylline Oraclesp. 97
Slavonic Enoch (2 Enoch)p. 98
4 Maccabeesp. 99
Testament of Mosesp. 100
Testament of Abrahamp. 100
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchsp. 101
Testament of Jobp. 104
Joseph and Asenathp. 105
Judean Desert manuscripts, inscriptions, and archaeologyp. 106
Synthesisp. 108
Transition to rabbinic Judaism: Yavnehp. 116
Major sourcesp. 116
Rabbinic literaturep. 116
Apocalypses of Ezra, Baruch, Abraham, and Johnp. 117
Sibylline Oraclesp. 120
The reconstruction at Yavnehp. 120
Synthesisp. 124
Special topicsp. 127
Temple and priesthoodp. 129
Theological basis of the cultp. 129
Temple and cultp. 132
The physical templep. 134
The cultic personnelp. 135
Financial support for the templep. 137
The cultic ritualsp. 138
Women and the cultp. 140
The cultic year: sabbath and annual festivalsp. 141
Music and singingp. 143
The high priest and "the Sanhedrin"p. 144
Synthesisp. 147
Scripture, prayer, and synagoguep. 150
Scribes and literacyp. 150
Scripture and canonp. 152
Main textsp. 153
Conclusions about canonizationp. 156
Development of the textp. 158
Summary about textual developmentsp. 164
Scriptural interpretationp. 165
Conclusions about scriptural interpretationp. 169
Prayer and the rise of the synagoguep. 170
"Popular religion"p. 175
Synthesisp. 178
Sects and movementsp. 183
Beginnings of sectarianismp. 183
Sadducees and Phariseesp. 185
Josephusp. 187
New Testamentp. 192
Rabbinic literaturep. 194
4QMMT and the Temple Scroll (11QT)p. 196
Summary and conclusionsp. 196
Essenesp. 199
Sourcesp. 200
The question of Qumranp. 201
Some tentative conclusionsp. 205
Other sects and groupsp. 206
Synthesisp. 206
Concepts of the Deity and the spirit worldp. 210
Developing views about Godp. 210
Ancient Israelp. 212
Innovations during the Second Temple periodp. 215
The question of monotheismp. 216
The spirit worldp. 219
Main textsp. 220
Summary on angelic beingsp. 224
The figure of Wisdom and the Logosp. 225
Main textsp. 225
Summary of the figure of Wisdomp. 227
The Logos traditionp. 228
Synthesisp. 230
Prophecy, apocalypticism, the esoteric arts, and predicting the futurep. 232
Problems of definitionp. 232
Did prophecy cease in the Second Temple period?p. 236
Main textsp. 237
Conclusionsp. 239
The esoteric arts and their usep. 241
Astrologyp. 241
Dreamsp. 243
Textual interpretationp. 245
Chronographyp. 246
Magic, mysticism, and controlling the spiritsp. 248
Prophetic and charismatic individualsp. 251
Synthesisp. 254
Eschatologies and ideas of salvationp. 257
Main textsp. 257
Synthesisp. 266
Personal eschatology: ideas about life after deathp. 267
Heavens and hellsp. 268
Cosmic eschatology: expectations about the end of the worldp. 269
Messiahsp. 271
Main textsp. 271
Hebrew Biblep. 271
Ben Sirap. 273
Qumran scrollsp. 273
Psalms of Solomonp. 276
Similitudes of Enoch (1 Enoch 37-71)p. 276
Philop. 276
Josephusp. 278
4 Ezra/2 Baruchp. 279
Sibylline Oraclesp. 280
New Testamentp. 280
Rabbinic literaturep. 281
The "Son of Man"p. 282
Sicarii, Zealots, and other "revolutionary" groupsp. 283
General commentsp. 284
The "Fourth Philosophy" and the Sicariip. 285
Zealotsp. 287
Synthesisp. 288
Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic worldp. 292
How they saw themselvesp. 292
Jewish identity and conversionp. 292
Ideology of the land and the concept of exilep. 297
Gender and sexualityp. 300
How others saw themp. 305
Philo-Judaism and anti-Judaismp. 305
Religious tolerancep. 308
Synthesisp. 310
Conclusionp. 313
Judaism in the Second Temple period: a holistic perspectivep. 315
Bibliographyp. 335
Indexesp. 387
Index of modern authorsp. 387
Index of names and subjectsp. 396
Index of citationsp. 407
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780415212502
ISBN-10: 0415212502
Audience: Tertiary; University or College
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 448
Published: 3rd August 2000
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 15.88  x 3.18
Weight (kg): 0.73
Edition Number: 1

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