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Jailhouse Journalism : The Fourth Estate Behind Bars - James McGrath Morris

Jailhouse Journalism

The Fourth Estate Behind Bars

Paperback Published: 15th November 2007
ISBN: 9780765808912
Number Of Pages: 251

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During the past two centuries a vibrant prison press has chronicled life behind bars in American prisons, championed inmate causes, and challenged those in authority who sought to silence it. At its apex, several hundred periodicals were published by and for inmates. Unlike their peers who passed their sentences stamping out license plates, these convicts spent their days like reporters in any community -- looking for the story. Yet their own story, the lengthy history of their unique brand of journalism, has remained largely unknown. In Jailhouse Journalism, James McGrath Morris presents the history of this medium, the lives of the men and women who brought it to life, and the controversies that often surround it.

The dramatic history of prison journalism has included many famous, notorious, and unique personalities such as Robert Morris, the "financier of the America Revolution"; the Younger Brothers of the Jesse James gang; Julian Hawthorne, the only son of Nathaniel Hawthorne; men of the radical Industrial Workers of the World (IWW); Charles Chapin, famed city editor of New York's Evening World until he murdered his wife; Dr. Frederick Cook, North Pole explorer whose claim to have been the first to reach the pole is still debated today; Tom Runyon, who won a place for himself in history with an Underwood; and Wilbert Rideau, an illiterate teenaged murderer who raised prison journalism to the pinnacle of achievement.

In his new introduction Morris addresses the spread of prison journalism into other forms of media, such as radio and the Internet. He discusses the conflicts between those who publish jailhouse news and those who would wish to control, or eliminate it altogether.

-The most current and comprehensive book available on correctional journalism ... a great study of freedom, confinement, communication and several nearly forgotten aspects of penal history.-

--Corrections Today

-An impressively researched history of a vital, neglected aspect of prison culture.-

--Punishment & Society

-Morris piece[s] together the rich and turbulent history of penal journalism...reaches beyond the publications to the fascinating lives of inmate journalists... belongs in the permanent collection of anyone interested in prisons or journalism.-

--The Angolite

-Thorough in providing a history of the prison press. . . . [S]hould be considered for supplemental reading in criminal justice classes and journalism history, law, and other courses. . . . [U]seful.-

--Journalism and Mass Communications Quarterly

-A splendidly researched history, a most timely message, and a deeply moving narrative.-

--H. Bruce Franklin, author, Prison Literature in America

-A careful, moving description of the minds and written works of American men and women behind bars.-

--Ben H. Bagdikian, author, The Shame of the Prisons and Caged

-Sometimes surprising and always fascinating.-

--Sanford J. Ungar, former co-host, -All Things Considered-

-Written with verve and insight, which in the end will get you thinking not only about journalism but also jails themselves.-

--John Maxwell Hamilton, Louisiana State University "The most current and comprehensive book available on correctional journalism ... a great study of freedom, confinement, communication and several nearly forgotten aspects of penal history."

--Corrections Today

"An impressively researched history of a vital, neglected aspect of prison culture."

--Punishment & Society

"Morris piece[s] together the rich and turbulent history of penal journalism...reaches beyond the publications to the fascinating lives of inmate journalists... belongs in the permanent collection of anyone interested in prisons or journalism."

--The Angolite

"Thorough in providing a history of the prison press. . . . [S]hould be considered for supplemental reading in criminal justice classes and journalism history, law, and other courses. . . . [U]seful."

--Journalism and Mass Communications Quarterly

"A splendidly researched history, a most timely message, and a deeply moving narrative."

--H. Bruce Franklin, author, Prison Literature in America

"A careful, moving description of the minds and written works of American men and women behind bars."

--Ben H. Bagdikian, author, The Shame of the Prisons and Caged

"Sometimes surprising and always fascinating."

--Sanford J. Ungar, former co-host, "All Things Considered"

"Written with verve and insight, which in the end will get you thinking not only about journalism but also jails themselves."

--John Maxwell Hamilton, Louisiana State University "The most current and comprehensive book available on correctional journalism ... a great study of freedom, confinement, communication and several nearly forgotten aspects of penal history."

--Corrections Today

"An impressively researched history of a vital, neglected aspect of prison culture."

--Punishment & Society

"Morris piece[s] together the rich and turbulent history of penal journalism...reaches beyond the publications to the fascinating lives of inmate journalists... belongs in the permanent collection of anyone interested in prisons or journalism."

--The Angolite

"Thorough in providing a history of the prison press. . . . [S]hould be considered for supplemental reading in criminal justice classes and journalism history, law, and other courses. . . . [U]seful."

--Journalism and Mass Communications Quarterly

"A splendidly researched history, a most timely message, and a deeply moving narrative."

--H. Bruce Franklin, author, Prison Literature in America

"A careful, moving description of the minds and written works of American men and women behind bars."

--Ben H. Bagdikian, author, The Shame of the Prisons and Caged

"Sometimes surprising and always fascinating."

--Sanford J. Ungar, former co-host, "All Things Considered"

"Written with verve and insight, which in the end will get you thinking not only about journalism but also jails themselves."

--John Maxwell Hamilton, Louisiana State University "The most current and comprehensive book available on correctional journalism ... a great study of freedom, confinement, communication and several nearly forgotten aspects of penal history."

--"Corrections Today" "An impressively researched history of a vital, neglected aspect of prison culture."

--Punishment & Society "Morris piece[s] together the rich and turbulent history of penal journalism...reaches beyond the publications to the fascinating lives of inmate journalists... belongs in the permanent collection of anyone interested in prisons or journalism."

--"The Angolite"

Introduction to the Transaction Editionp. ix
Prefacep. 1
Introduction: Putting Down Doing Timep. 5
Forlorn Hopep. 19
When Luceppa Bared Her Bosomp. 31
The Summaryp. 37
The Reformists' Newspapersp. 47
The Prison Mirrorp. 55
The Mentorp. 65
The Subterranean Brotherhoodp. 73
Federal Scribesp. 81
Can Opener, New Era, and the Wobbliesp. 91
The Rose Man of Sing Singp. 99
Harelike Growthp. 111
Chronicling Wrongful Imprisonmentp. 119
Der Rufp. 127
Leaves from a Lifer's Notebookp. 133
Yoke of Censorshipp. 147
Bayou Stylep. 157
Fighting Backp. 169
The First Amendment and the Prison Pressp. 179
Prison Journalism Writes "-30-"p. 187
Epiloguep. 195
American Penal Press Contest Winners 1965-1990p. 197
Prison Publications by Statep. 209
Notesp. 223
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780765808912
ISBN-10: 0765808919
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 251
Published: 15th November 2007
Publisher: TRANSACTION PUBL
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 22.56 x 15.14  x 1.5
Weight (kg): 0.37
Edition Type: New edition