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IP Network Design : Networking Series - Cormac Long

IP Network Design

Networking Series

Paperback

Published: 1st January 2001
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Publishing Rationale - Internet Protocol (IP) - is the main communications protocol used in the Internet and on the vast majority of corporate networks. - Growing needs for networks - Networks are becoming bigger and more complex. Currently, corporate networks are not designed to accommodate multimedia; therefore, IP based networks need to be redesigned to meet the demands. Demands will include Voice over IP, ATM over IP, and more. IP Network Design will guide network professionals through the processes on how to meet these demands. - Soaring unified messaging product sales - Voice over IP products sales are skyrocketing, from ?139 million in 1999 to ?2.4 billion in 2006 (Frost and Sullivan). Therefore, there is an enormous market to have a guide for network professionals to understand how to implement and design this high selling innovative products. According to a current study (UC Davis, 1999), by the end of 2001 in excess of 95% of corporate data applications in the US will exclusively use IP.

Prefacep. xvi
Acknowledgmentsp. xviii
Principles of Network Designp. 1
Design Objectivesp. 2
Performancep. 2
Redundancy and Resiliencep. 4
Accommodating Growth and Changep. 5
Management and Manageabilityp. 6
Securityp. 7
Disaster Recoveryp. 7
Costp. 7
Understanding the Networking Environmentp. 8
Network Applicationsp. 9
The Cost of Downtimep. 10
Achieving the Design Goalsp. 10
The Importance of Being Predictablep. 12
Fundamental Design Principlesp. 13
Designing the Wide Area Network (WAN)p. 17
Designing a Wide Area Network (WAN) Topologyp. 18
Flat Versus Hierarchicalp. 18
Flat WAN Topologyp. 20
Advantages of a Flat WAN Structurep. 23
Limitations of a Flat Designp. 25
Routing Protocol Limitationsp. 25
Conclusionp. 31
Hierarchicalp. 31
PVC and Leased Line Aggregationp. 32
Cost-effective Bandwidth Deploymentp. 33
Shorter Leased Line Distancesp. 34
Reduced Core Router Ports or Interfacesp. 35
Less Routing Protocol Neighborsp. 35
Route Summarizationp. 35
Broadcast Control in the WANp. 37
Disaster Recoveryp. 37
Issues with a Hierarchical Designp. 37
WAN Costsp. 37
Additional Router Hopsp. 38
Conclusionp. 41
The Hierarchical Layersp. 41
The Tier-3 Layerp. 41
The Tier-2 Layerp. 44
The Backbone: Tier-1p. 47
WAN Design Parametersp. 52
Costp. 52
Availability and Performancep. 53
Redundancy and Resiliencep. 55
How Real Is the Resilience?p. 57
Choosing the WAN Technologyp. 59
Design Considerations for Serial Linksp. 60
Designing IP over Frame Relayp. 64
Broadcasting over Frame Relayp. 64
Using Sub-Interfaces in an IP Environmentp. 65
PVC Meshing and IP Redundancyp. 68
Dynamic Routing over Frame Relayp. 72
Frame Relay Traffic Managementp. 76
Private Frame Relayp. 78
ISDN Design Issues with IPp. 79
IP Routing over ISDNp. 79
Using ISDN for Redundancyp. 82
PPP and Multilink PPPp. 86
Designing IP over ATMp. 87
Benefits of ATMp. 88
ATM Design Issuesp. 89
Private ATMp. 97
Voice and Data Integrationp. 98
Fundamental IP Routing Designp. 107
Designing an IP Addressing Planp. 108
Choice of Major Network Addressesp. 108
Subnet Planningp. 109
VLSMp. 111
Planning for Route Summarizationp. 114
Categorizing IP Routing Protocolsp. 122
Distance Vector and Link State Protocolsp. 122
Classful and Classless Routingp. 123
Classful Route Advertisements and Summarizationp. 124
Choosing a Routing Protocolp. 125
Scalabilityp. 126
Routing Updatesp. 126
Routing Protocol Stabilityp. 127
Speed of Convergencep. 130
Routing Metricp. 133
Support of VLSMp. 135
Discontiguous Networksp. 135
Route Summarizationp. 136
Understanding Load Balancingp. 141
Securityp. 142
When To Use Static Routesp. 143
Routing Information Protocolp. 145
RIP Version 1p. 145
RIP Version 2p. 146
RIP Convergencep. 147
Scalable IP Routing I-OSPFp. 151
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)p. 152
Why Use OSPF7p. 152
How OSPF Operatesp. 154
Link State Advertisements (LSAs)p. 155
Neighbor and Adjacency Formationp. 159
SPF Algorithmp. 161
OSPF Convergencep. 163
OSPF Network Typesp. 164
Broadcast Networks and Designated Routersp. 165
Point-to-Point Networksp. 168
Non-broadcast Networksp. 168
Point-to-Multipoint Networksp. 171
Designing Within the Hierarchical Structurep. 172
Rules for the OSPF Area Structurep. 174
Scaling Limitations for OSPF Areasp. 179
OSPF Routersp. 181
Stub Areasp. 188
Totally Stubby Areasp. 190
Not-So-Stubby Areas (NSSA)p. 190
Virtual Linksp. 193
Variable-Length Subnet Masking (VLSM)p. 197
Route Summarization in OSPFp. 198
How OSPF Summarizesp. 199
OSPF and ISDNp. 202
OSPF Demand Circuitp. 202
Conclusionp. 205
Scalable IP Routing II- EIGRP and Protocol Redistributionp. 207
EIGRP Operational Characteristicsp. 208
Protocol Overviewp. 208
EIGRP Concepts and Operationp. 210
EIGRP Convergencep. 218
Convergence and DUALp. 218
Convergence Problems with EIGRPp. 219
Load Balancing with EIGRPp. 225
VLSMp. 227
Route Summarizationp. 228
The Automatic Summarization Mythp. 229
The Power of Manual Route Summarizationp. 230
EIGRP over NBMA Networksp. 233
PVC Bandwidth Allocationp. 234
EIGRP in a Multiprotocol Environmentp. 236
Protocol Redistributionp. 236
Preventing Routing Loopsp. 238
Route Determinationp. 239
Migrating from IGRPp. 243
Migration Strategyp. 244
Issues Worth Notingp. 245
A Case Study in EIGRP Migrationp. 246
EIGRP and OSPF: Comparison Summaryp. 248
Complexity of Operationp. 248
Design Restrictionsp. 248
Ease of Configurationp. 249
Scalabilityp. 249
Convergencep. 249
Route Summarizationp. 250
VLSMp. 250
Proprietaryp. 250
Misconceptions in the Marketplacep. 251
Conclusionp. 252
BGP and Internet Routingp. 253
BGP Operation and Characteristicsp. 254
BGP Overviewp. 254
Fundamental Internet Architecturep. 256
When Is BGP the Correct Option?p. 257
EBGP and IBGPp. 259
Synchronizationp. 261
BGP Stability - Problems and Solutionsp. 263
IGP Redistribution into BGPp. 265
BGP Redistribution into IGPp. 266
BGP Path Selection and Manipulationp. 270
BGP Attributesp. 270
BGP Route Selectionp. 278
BGP Filteringp. 278
Attribute Manipulation and Policy-Based Routingp. 281
Policy Based Routing Examplesp. 282
BGP Resilience and Redundancyp. 285
Default Routes to Each ISPp. 285
Default Routes in Tandem with BGPp. 287
Receiving Full BGP Routesp. 289
Scalable AS Routingp. 290
Route Aggregationp. 290
Route Reflectorsp. 292
Route Reflector Design and Migration Issuesp. 296
BGP Confederations and Private ASp. 297
Peer Groups Within BGPp. 299
Designing the LAN I-The Campusp. 301
Campus Network Design Goalsp. 302
Performance Parametersp. 302
Diversity of Applications and QOSp. 303
Effective Resiliencep. 304
Scalabilityp. 309
Understanding the Campus Networkp. 310
Client-Server Traffic Flowp. 310
To Switch or Not To Switch?p. 310
Designing a LAN Topologyp. 321
Segmentation Using Routingp. 321
Segmentation Using Switchingp. 325
The Importance of Layer 3 Switchingp. 330
Campus Hierarchical Designp. 335
Access Layerp. 336
Intermediate Layerp. 337
Campus Backbonep. 343
Collapsed Backbone versus Distributedp. 348
Routed Backbone versus Switchedp. 350
Sample Campus Topologyp. 358
Designing the LAN II - VLANs, Multicasting, and QoSp. 361
VLAN Planningp. 362
Why Implement VLANs?p. 362
The Physical Scope of VLANsp. 365
VLAN Managementp. 367
VLAN Trunkingp. 368
VLAN Gateways and Resiliencep. 370
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)p. 378
Spanning Tree Refresherp. 378
Fundamental Design Issuesp. 383
Optimizing STPp. 390
STP and Port Aggregationp. 394
IP Multicastingp. 396
The Significance of Multicastingp. 396
An Overview of IP Multicastingp. 399
QoS and RSVPp. 422
RSVP Overviewp. 423
RSVP Operationp. 424
Design and Implementation Considerationsp. 431
Network Securityp. 435
Developing a Security Strategyp. 436
Productivity Versus Protectionp. 436
Elements of Information Protectionp. 437
Risk and Vulnerability Assessmentp. 438
Developing a Security Policyp. 440
Security Toolsp. 441
Packet Filteringp. 442
Encryptionp. 449
Virtual Private Networks (VPNs)p. 453
Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs)p. 454
Password Managementp. 456
Security Serversp. 457
IPv6 and IPSecp. 458
Firewallsp. 461
Firewall Functionsp. 461
Firewall Architecturep. 464
Firewall Policiesp. 467
Security Design and Implementationp. 476
Device Securityp. 476
Network Securityp. 477
Protection Against Common IP Threatsp. 479
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780072129991
ISBN-10: 0072129999
Series: Networking Series
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 532
Published: 1st January 2001
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education - Europe
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 19.0  x 2.7
Weight (kg): 0.91