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Hegel and Newtonianism : ARCHIVES INTERNATIONALES D'HISTOIRE DES IDEES/INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE HISTORY OF IDEAS - Michael J. Petry

Hegel and Newtonianism

ARCHIVES INTERNATIONALES D'HISTOIRE DES IDEES/INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE HISTORY OF IDEAS

By: Michael J. Petry (Editor)

Hardcover

Published: 31st October 1993
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It could certainly be argued that the way in which Hegel criticizes Newton in the Dissertation, the Philosophy of Nature and the lectures on the History of Philosophy, has done more than anything else to prejudice his own reputation. At first sight, what we seem to have here is little more than the contrast between the tested accomplishments of the founding father of modern science, and the random remarks of a confused and somewhat disgruntled philosopher; and if we are persuaded to concede that it may perhaps be something more than this - between the work of a clearsighted mathematician and experimentalist, and the blind assertions of some sort of Kantian logician, blundering about among the facts of the real world. By and large, it was this clear-cut simplistic view of the matter which prevailed among Hegel's contemporaries, and which persisted until fairly recently. The modification and eventual transformation of it have come about gradually, over the past twenty or twenty-five years. The first full-scale commentary on the Philosophy of Nature was published in 1970, and gave rise to the realization that to some extent at least, the Hegelian criticism was directed against Newtonianism rather than the work of Newton himself, and that it tended to draw its inspiration from developments within the natural sciences, rather than from the exigencies imposed upon Hegel's thinking by a priori categorial relationships.

Foreword
Metaphysics and Scientific Proof: Newton and Hegelp. 3
The Conflict between Newton's Analysis of Configurations and Hegel's Conceptual Analysisp. 17
Analysis, Synthesis and Dialectic: Hegel's Answer to Aristotle, Newton and Kantp. 27
Gravity, Polarity and Dialectical Methodp. 41
Hegel on the Interaction between Science and Philosophyp. 61
Hegel's Interpretation of Classical Mechanicsp. 73
The Philosophical Background to Hegel's Criticism of Newtonp. 81
The Logic of Hegel's Philosophy of Naturep. 91
Defending Hegel's Philosophy of Naturep. 103
Newton and Hegel: Can Science Explain the Scientist?p. 115
Newton's Pantokrator and Hegel's Absolute Mindp. 125
The Method of Exhaustion as a Model for the Calculusp. 139
Hegel on Greek Mathematics and the Modern Calculusp. 149
Newton and British Newtonians on the Foundations of the Calculusp. 167
The Dialectical Structure of Zeno's Argumentsp. 179
Hegel's Heritage in Applied Mathematics: A Plurality of Traditionsp. 201
Hegel on Mathematics and Experimental Sciencep. 209
Inertial and Gravitational Mass: Newton, Hegel and Modern Physicsp. 229
The Problem of Mass in Hegelp. 249
Pendulums in Newtonian Mechanicsp. 267
Classifying the Motion: Hegel on the Pendulump. 291
The Problem of Falling Bodies - from Galilei to Lagrangep. 317
Hegel on Galilei's Law of Fallp. 331
Eighteenth-Century Conceptions of Gravitationp. 343
Hegel's Treatment of Universal Gravitationp. 367
The Concept of Force in Eighteenth-Century Mechanicsp. 383
Hegel's Rejection of the Concept of Forcep. 399
Universal Gravitation from Elliptical Orbitsp. 415
A Worm in Newton's Applep. 429
The Significance of Kepler's Lawsp. 439
The Early Debate Concerning Wave-Theoryp. 517
Hegel on Mechanistic Models of Lightp. 531
Newton's Rejection of the Modification Theory of Colourp. 547
Hegel's Exposition of Goethe's Theory of Colourp. 557
Newton's Colour-Theory and Perceptionp. 569
Hegel on Shadows and the Blue of the Skyp. 579
Newtonian Atomism and Eighteenth-Century Chemistryp. 595
Chemistry and Hegel's Logicp. 609
Newton and Eighteenth-Century Conceptions of Chemical Affinityp. 619
The Significance of Hegel's Treatment of Chemical Affinityp. 631
Is Nature Conformable to Herself?p. 645
Hegel on Chemistry and the Organic Sciencesp. 657
Hegel's Library: The Works on Mathematics, Mechanics, Optics and Chemistryp. 669
Hegel's Library: The Newton Editionsp. 711
About the Authorsp. 721
Abbreviationsp. 727
Bibliographyp. 731
Indexp. 767
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780792322023
ISBN-10: 0792322029
Series: ARCHIVES INTERNATIONALES D'HISTOIRE DES IDEES/INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE HISTORY OF IDEAS
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 793
Published: 31st October 1993
Publisher: Springer
Country of Publication: NL
Dimensions (cm): 25.4 x 17.78  x 4.45
Weight (kg): 1.27
Edition Type: Annotated