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Faces in the Forest : The Endangered Muriqui Monkeys of Brazil - Karen B. Strier

Faces in the Forest

The Endangered Muriqui Monkeys of Brazil

Hardcover

Published: 1st October 1992
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The woolly spider monkey, or muriqui, is one of the most endangered primate species in the world today. Because of deforestation pressures in its natural habitat-- the Atlantic coastal forests of southeastern Brazil--the muriquis are confined to less than three percent of their original range. There are now only a dozen forest fragments known to support a total muriqui population of about 500 individuals. This book traces the natural history of the muriqui from its scientific discovery in 1806 to its current, highly endangered status. The book provides a case study of this scientifically important primate species by balancing field research and ecological issues. Through Strier's accessible presentation, readers gain a broad understanding of primate behavior and tropical conservation. The book also gives a practical account of how to set up and pursue an in-depth longitudinal study of an animal population, while describing the excitement of gaining first the muriquis' trust and then insights into their lives. The author offers the unique perspective of a highly committed anthropologist who has devoted years to the observation of this unique species, while working to train students and to protect the muriquis' remaining forest habitats. The book will interest biologists, primatologists, and zoologists, as well as anyone concerned with conservation, ecology, and animal behavior.

"This book, written in a very readable style, presents the results of a major ecology, natural history, and conservation study of these primates. Recommended." --Wildlife Activist "[A] short but informative and well-written book. . . . I would highly recommend Faces in the Forest to any student considering field research on non-human primates. Strier describes with great clarity the first impressions and obstacles faced by a naive primatologist beginning a new field study in a foreign country. It will certainly interest lay readers, and it is especially appropriate for undergraduate students in anthropology or animal behavior. I would recommend the book to anyone who wants to know what primate field work is 'really like,' to primatologists who want to obtain an overview of muriqui socioecology, and to any field researcher who enjoys reading about these inevitable difficulties and anecdotes that never reach the pages of scientific journals." --American Journal of Physical Anthropology "The book comfortably attains its principal goal, which is to bring the fascinating life-style of the muriquis (not to mention that of the field primatologist) to a wide audience. Conservation is also a major theme, and the message gets through nicely." -- International Journal of Primatology "This important book provides a readable, remarkably thorough, first look at the biology of the Muriqui, the largest New World primate. Strier's work reveals many startling contrasts with the generally accepted model for primate social behavior (and, by extension, the evolution of human behavior) based on Old World monkeys and apes. . . . Using nontechnical language, the author includes a personal history of her pioneering studies as well as covering the ecology, male and female roles, life histories, and group dynamics of the Muriqui . . . . Comparable to the works of Jane Goodall, this highly recommended book will appeal to a wide range of readers." --Choice "Engaging. Well indexed and containing an extensive bibliographic reference list . . . it is also good for interesting casual reading. The book would make a welcome addition to any collection on primates." --Wildlife Review "A highly readable account of a behaviorally atypical primate barely rescued from extinction, is essential reading for anyone interested in primate socioecology or conservation." --Evolutionary Anthropology "Provides a case study of this scientifically important primate species by balancing field research and ecological issues. Through Strier's accessible presentation, readers gain a broad understanding of primate behavior and tropical conservation. The book also gives a practical account of how to set up and pursue an in-depth longitudinal study of an animal population, while describing the excitement of gaining first the muriquis' trust and then insights into their lives. The author offers the unique perspective of a highly committed anthropologist who has devoted years to the observation of this unique species while working to train students and to protect the muriquis' remaining forest habitats. Will interest biologists, primatologists, and zoologists, as well as anyone concerned with conservation, ecology, and animal behavior." --Primate-Talk, Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center "This book, written in a very readable style, presents the results of a major ecology, natural history, and conservation study of these primates. Recommended." --Wildlife Activist "[A] short but informative and well-written book. . . . I would highly recommend Faces in the Forest to any student considering field research on non-human primates. Strier describes with great clarity the first impressions and obstacles faced by a naive primatologist beginning a new field study in a foreign country. It will certainly interest lay readers, and it is especially appropriate for undergraduate students in anthropology or animal behavior. I would recommend the book to anyone who wants to know what primate field work is 'really like,' to primatologists who want to obtain an overview of muriqui socioecology, and to any field researcher who enjoys reading about these inevitable difficulties and anecdotes that never reach the pages of scientific journals." --American Journal of Physical Anthropology "The book comfortably attains its principal goal, which is to bring the fascinating life-style of the muriquis (not to mention that of the field primatologist) to a wide audience. Conservation is also a major theme, and the message gets through nicely." -- International Journal of Primatology "This important book provides a readable, remarkably thorough, first look at the biology of the Muriqui, the largest New World primate. Strier's work reveals many startling contrasts with the generally accepted model for primate social behavior (and, by extension, the evolution of human behavior) based on Old World monkeys and apes. . . . Using nontechnical language, the author includes a personal history of her pioneering studies as well as covering the ecology, male and female roles, life histories, and group dynamics of the Muriqui . . . . Comparable to the works of Jane Goodall, this highly recommended book will appeal to a wide range of readers." --Choice "Engaging. Well indexed and containing an extensive bibliographic reference list . . . it is also good for interesting casual reading. The book would make a welcome addition to any collection on primates." --Wildlife Review "A highly readable account of a behaviorally atypical primate barely rescued from extinction, is essential reading for anyone interested in primate socioecology or conservation." --Evolutionary Anthropology "Provides a case study of this scientifically important primate species by balancing field research and ecological issues. Through Strier's accessible presentation, readers gain a broad understanding of primate behavior and tropical conservation. The book also gives a practical account of how to set up and pursue an in-depth longitudinal study of an animal population, while describing the excitement of gaining first the muriquis' trust and then insights into their lives. The author offers the unique perspective of a highly committed anthropologist who has devoted years to the observation of this unique species while working to train students and to protect the muriquis' remaining forest habitats. Will interest biologists, primatologists, and zoologists, as well as anyone concerned with conservation, ecology, and animal behavior." --Primate-Talk, Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center

1: Charcoal Monkey 2: Fragmented Forest 3: Models to Mud 4: From Days to Years 5: Early Risers and Other Surprises 6: Peaceful Patrilines 7: Life Histories, Unsolved Mysteries 8: Conservation Concerns and Compromises

ISBN: 9780195063394
ISBN-10: 0195063392
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 158
Published: 1st October 1992
Publisher: Oxford University Press Inc
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 24.2 x 16.0  x 1.5
Weight (kg): 0.51