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Engineering and Scientific Computing with Scilab - C. Bunks

Engineering and Scientific Computing with Scilab

By: C. Bunks (Contribution by), Jean-Philippe Chancelier (Contribution by), F. Delebecque (Contribution by), M. Goursat (Contribution by), Ramine Nikoukhah (Contribution by)

Book with Other Items Published: 1999
ISBN: 9780817640095
Number Of Pages: 491

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Scilab is a powerful open computing environment designed for engineering and scientific applications. Engineering and Scientific Computing with Scilab provides a comprehensive overview of Scilab's utilization including integrated graphics, incorporation of user-provided functions, and a tour of its numerous and powerful applications toolboxes.

"Highly recommended for students and professionals dealing with engineering and scientific computation--and seeking a powerful software alternative." --Simulation News Europe "For those who are unfamiliar with Scilab, here is a chance to get an introduction to this freeware package from a group that has been using Scilab in the classroom and the industry!. The book provides an overview of Scilab and consists of three major sections: an introduction to the software, a discussion of the major toolboxes, and a section on applications!. [Part II] provides a good summary of the types of computation Scilab is capable of performing, as well as a brief overview of many commands!. As an introduction to Scilab, this book is an excellent guide." --IEEE Control Systems Magazine

Prefacep. xiii
List of Figuresp. xix
List of Tablesp. xxv
The Scilab Packagep. 1
Introductionp. 3
What Is Scilab?p. 3
Getting Startedp. 7
The Scilab Languagep. 17
Constantsp. 17
Real Numbersp. 17
Complex Numbersp. 18
Character Stringsp. 18
Special Constantsp. 18
Data Typesp. 19
Matrices of Numbersp. 19
Sparse Matrices of Numbersp. 19
Matrices of Polynomialsp. 20
Boolean Matricesp. 20
Sparse Boolean Matricesp. 20
String Matricesp. 20
Listsp. 21
Typed Listsp. 21
Functions of Rational Matricesp. 22
Functions and Librariesp. 22
Scilab Syntaxp. 23
Variablesp. 23
Assignmentsp. 24
Expressionsp. 24
The list and tlist Operationsp. 29
Flow Controlp. 32
Functions and Scriptsp. 36
Commandsp. 42
Data-Type-Related Functionsp. 44
Type Conversion Functionsp. 44
Type Enquiry Functionsp. 47
Overloadingp. 47
Operator Overloadingp. 49
Primitive Functionsp. 52
How to Customize the Display of Variablesp. 53
Graphicsp. 55
The Mediap. 55
The Graphics Windowp. 56
The Driverp. 58
Global Handling Commandsp. 58
Global Plot Parametersp. 60
Graphical Contextp. 61
Indirect Manipulation of the Graphics Contextp. 63
2-D Plottingp. 64
Basic Syntax for 2-D Plotsp. 64
Specialized 2-D Plotting Functionsp. 70
Captions and Presentationp. 73
Plotting Geometric Figuresp. 75
Some Graphics Functions for Automatic Controlp. 78
Interactive Graphics Utilitiesp. 79
3-D Plottingp. 79
3-D Plottingp. 81
Specialized 3-D Plots and Toolsp. 83
Mixing 2-D and 3-D Graphicsp. 83
Examplesp. 85
Subwindowsp. 85
A Set of Figuresp. 86
Printing Graphics and Exporting to Latexp. 86
Window to Printerp. 88
Creating a Postscript Filep. 88
Including a Postscript File in Latexp. 89
Scilab, Xfig, and Postscriptp. 92
Creating Encapsulated Postscript Filesp. 92
A Tour of Some Basic Functionsp. 95
Linear Algebrap. 95
QR Factorizationp. 96
Singular Value Decompositionp. 98
Schur Form and Eigenvaluesp. 99
Block Diagonalization and Eigenvectorsp. 100
Fine Structurep. 102
Subspacesp. 104
Polynomial and Rational Function Manipulationp. 106
General Purpose Functionsp. 106
Matrix Pencilsp. 109
Sparse Matricesp. 111
Random Numbersp. 114
Cumulative Distribution Functions and Their Inversesp. 117
Advanced Programmingp. 119
Functions and Primitivesp. 119
The Call Functionp. 121
Building Interface Programsp. 124
Accessing "Global" Variables Within a Wrapperp. 129
Stack Handling Functionsp. 129
Functional Argumentsp. 132
Interscip. 135
A First Intersci Examplep. 135
Intersci Descriptor File Syntaxp. 136
Dynamic Linkingp. 145
Static Linkingp. 147
Static Linking of an Interfacep. 147
Functional Argument: Static Linkingp. 148
Toolsp. 149
Systems and Control Toolboxp. 151
Linear Systemsp. 151
State-Space Representationp. 151
Transfer-Matrix Representationp. 153
System Definitionp. 154
Interconnected Systemsp. 155
Linear Fractional Transformation (LFT)p. 159
Time Discretizationp. 159
Improper Systemsp. 162
Scilab Representationp. 163
Scilab Implementationp. 164
System Operationsp. 166
Pole-Zero Calculationsp. 167
Controllability and Pole Placementp. 168
Observability and Observersp. 170
Control Toolsp. 172
Classical Controlp. 179
Frequency Response Plotsp. 183
State-Space Controlp. 186
Augmenting the Plantp. 188
Standard Problemp. 190
LQG Designp. 191
Scilab Tools for Controller Designp. 194
H[infinity] Controlp. 197
Model Reductionp. 199
Identificationp. 203
Linear Matrix Inequalitiesp. 207
Signal Processingp. 209
Time and Frequency Representation of Signalsp. 209
Resampling Signalsp. 210
The DFT and the FFTp. 210
Transfer Function Representation of Signalsp. 212
State-Space Representationp. 216
Changing System Representationp. 217
Frequency-Response Evaluationp. 218
The Chirp z-Transformp. 222
Filtering and Filter Designp. 224
Filteringp. 224
Finite Impulse Response Filter Designp. 226
Infinite Impulse Response Filter Designp. 234
Spectral Estimationp. 238
The Modified Periodogram Methodp. 241
The Correlation Methodp. 243
Simulation and Optimization Toolsp. 247
Modelsp. 247
Integrating ODEsp. 248
Calling odep. 250
Choosing Between Methodsp. 261
ODE Integration with Stopping Timesp. 261
Sampled Systemsp. 263
Integrating DAEsp. 265
Implicit Linear ODEsp. 265
General DAEsp. 267
DAEs with Stopping Timep. 279
Solving Optimization Problemsp. 280
Quadratic Optimizationp. 281
General Optimizationp. 284
Solving Systems of Equationsp. 291
SCICOS--A Dynamical System Builder and Simulatorp. 293
Hybrid System Formalismp. 293
Getting Startedp. 295
Constructing Simple Modelp. 295
Model Simulationp. 299
Symbolic Parameters and "Context"p. 301
Use of Super Blockp. 303
Simulation Outside the Scicos Environmentp. 305
Basic Conceptsp. 307
Basic Blocksp. 307
Inheritance and Time Dependencep. 311
Synchronizationp. 312
Block Constructionp. 313
Super Blockp. 314
Scifunc Blockp. 314
Generic Blockp. 315
Fortran Block and c Blocksp. 315
Interfacing Functionp. 315
Computational Functionp. 323
Examplep. 331
Palettesp. 332
Existing Palettesp. 332
Constructing New Palettesp. 336
Symbolic/Numeric Environmentp. 339
Introductionp. 339
Generating Optimized Fortran Code with Maplep. 342
Maple to Scilab Interfacep. 349
First Example: Simulation of a Rolling Wheelp. 354
Second Example: Control of an n-Link Pendulump. 358
Simulation of the n-Link Pendulump. 360
Control of the n-Link Pendulump. 363
Graph and Network Toolbox: Metanetp. 367
What Is a Graph?p. 368
Representation of Graphsp. 369
Standard Tail/Head Representationp. 369
Other Representationsp. 371
Graphs and Sparse Matricesp. 378
Creating and Loading Graphsp. 378
Creating Graphsp. 378
Loading and Saving Graphsp. 380
Using the Metanet Windowp. 380
Generating Graphs and Networksp. 385
Graph and Network Computationsp. 387
Getting Information About Graphsp. 387
Paths and Nodesp. 388
Modifying Graphsp. 388
Creating New Graphs From Old Onesp. 389
Graph problem Solvingp. 389
Network Flowsp. 390
The Pipe Network Problemp. 397
Other Computationsp. 398
Examples Using Metanetp. 398
Routing in the Paris Metrop. 399
Praxitele Transportation Systemp. 400
Applicationsp. 411
Modal Identification of a Mechanical Structurep. 413
Modeling the Systemp. 413
Modeling the Excitationp. 415
Decomposition of the Unknown Inputp. 415
Contribution of the Colored Noisep. 416
Contribution of the Harmonicsp. 418
The Final Discrete-State Modelp. 420
State-Space Representation and an ARMA Modelp. 421
Modal Identificationp. 423
Instrumental Variable Methodp. 423
Balanced Realization Methodp. 429
Numerical Experimentsp. 431
Basic Computationsp. 431
Some Plots of Resultsp. 434
Control of Hydraulic Equipment in a River Valleyp. 441
Introductionp. 441
Description of a Managed River Valleyp. 442
Hydraulic Equipment in a River Valleyp. 442
Power Productionp. 442
Structural Analysisp. 442
Controller Structurep. 444
Central Hydraulic Supervision Stationp. 444
Local Controllersp. 446
Race Modelingp. 447
Physical Descriptionp. 447
Mathematical Modelp. 448
Race Numerical Simulationp. 449
Choice of Observationp. 452
Volume Observerp. 454
Level Observep. 455
Control of a Racep. 457
Race Dynamics Identificationp. 457
Local Control Synthesisp. 460
Series Anticipations Designp. 461
Parallel Anticipation Designp. 463
Feedback Controller Designp. 465
Metalido Overviewp. 466
Graphical User Interfacep. 466
Scicosp. 467
Data Structuresp. 477
Bibliographyp. 481
Indexp. 487
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780817640095
ISBN-10: 0817640096
Audience: Professional
Format: Book with Other Items
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 491
Published: 1999
Publisher: SPRINGER VERLAG GMBH
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 26.16 x 17.78  x 2.87
Weight (kg): 0.95