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Ecological Interface Design - Catherine M. Burns

Hardcover Published: 25th June 2004
ISBN: 9780415283748
Number Of Pages: 342

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Ecological Interface Design delivers the techniques and examples that provide you with a foundation to succeed in designing advanced display graphics. The opening chapters introduce the "art" of interface design by exposing the analytical methods behind designs, the most common graphical forms, and how these methods and forms are pulled together to create a complete design.

The book then incorporates case studies that further emphasize techniques and results. Each example exemplifies a solution to a certain part of the EID puzzle. Some of the examples demonstrate the analysis phase, while others apply more scrutiny to graphical design. Each is unique, allowing allowing you to use them in the development of your own designs.

The volume concludes with an analysis that connects ecological interface design with other common interface design methods, enabling you to better understand how to combine approaches in the creation of design solutions.

Burns and Hajdukiewicz have done a masterful job at moving EID from a craft that can be performed only by a few insiders using a great deal of 'black magic' to a more easily understood and practiced design skill.

Table of Contentsp. vii
List of Figuresp. xvii
List of Tablesp. xxiii
Forewordp. xxv
Prefacep. xxix
Acknowledgmentsp. xxxi
List of Acronymsp. xxxiii
Introduction and Overviewp. 1
Scope of This Bookp. 2
Types of Design Problemsp. 3
The Ecological Part of EIDp. 4
Outlinep. 4
Motivation for EIDp. 5
When Asking Users Doesn't Workp. 5
When We Want Users to Become Expertsp. 7
When We Want to Handle the Unexpectedp. 7
Historyp. 8
Work Domain Analysisp. 13
Defining the System of Interestp. 13
What Is an Abstraction Hierarchy?p. 15
Level by Level, Working through an Abstraction Hierarchyp. 18
Functional Purposep. 18
Distinguishing Purposes from Tasksp. 19
Abstract Functionp. 21
Generalized Functionp. 22
Distinguishing Processes from Tasksp. 24
Physical Functionp. 25
Physical Formp. 26
Functional and Causal Descriptionsp. 27
Part-Whole Hierarchiesp. 28
Models with Social Constraintsp. 31
Techniques for Managing Large Modelsp. 32
Systematic Decompositionp. 32
Link Tablesp. 32
Models of Multiple Domainsp. 34
Testing Your Model for Completenessp. 36
Scenario Mappingp. 37
Testing Your Model through Questionnairesp. 40
Summary: Double-Checking Your Work Domain Model--Rules to Use as You Actually Build Itp. 41
Define the System of Interestp. 41
Start Building Your Abstraction Hierarchy from the Topp. 42
Next Work from the Bottomp. 42
Complete the Middlep. 43
Make Sure Every Box Is Connected Up and Downp. 43
Check Your Languagep. 43
Develop Detail as Time Allowsp. 44
Translate Your Hierarchy in Variables, Constraints, and Relationshipsp. 44
Show the Value of Your Analysisp. 44
The Language of Interface Designp. 47
Interface Descriptionp. 47
Forms of Referencep. 49
Propositional Formsp. 49
Iconic Formsp. 50
Analogical Formsp. 51
Conveying Information with Different Formsp. 51
Analog and Digital Formsp. 52
Digital Formsp. 53
Analog Formsp. 54
Contextp. 54
Saliencep. 55
A Visual Thesaurus for Data Relationshipsp. 56
Single Variable Display Optionsp. 57
Variable within Limitsp. 57
Bar Graphp. 57
Meterp. 58
Digital Displayp. 59
Analog Plus Digital Displayp. 59
Symbolic Displayp. 59
Variable with a Constraintp. 60
Pie Graphp. 60
Variable Where Normal Is Critical to Monitorp. 61
Meterp. 61
Symbolp. 61
Translating or Rotating Linesp. 62
Variable Changes with Time, or Rate of Change of Variable Is of Interestp. 62
Trend Chartsp. 62
Arrowsp. 63
Multivariate Display Optionsp. 63
Variable Balance, Variable = Variablep. 63
Connected Bar Graphsp. 63
Balances with Trend Chartsp. 64
Variables Are Additivep. 65
Summing Bar Graphp. 65
Nomographsp. 65
Summing Trend Chartp. 66
Variables Are Multiplicativep. 67
Trigonometric or Triangle Relationsp. 67
Nomographsp. 67
Multiple Variables Determine System Statep. 68
Configural Displaysp. 68
Polar Displaysp. 69
Bar Graphs with Configural Featuresp. 70
Line Graphs with Configural Featuresp. 71
Mass Data Diagramsp. 71
Multiple Variable Balancep. 72
Close Proximity Metersp. 72
Connected Metersp. 73
Multiple Variables with Interacting Constraintsp. 73
Variables on a Background of Constraintsp. 73
Structural Display Optionsp. 74
Linear Structuresp. 74
Linesp. 74
Spiralsp. 75
Spatial Structuresp. 76
Mapsp. 76
Matricesp. 76
Symbolic Structuresp. 77
Treesp. 77
Networksp. 77
Mimics and Other Diagramsp. 78
How to Develop a New Visual Formp. 79
Summary: Visual Thesaurus Review Sheetp. 82
Using a Work Domain Model in Designp. 85
Information Requirementsp. 85
Types of Measures at Each Levelp. 87
Functional Purposep. 87
Abstract Functionp. 88
Generalized Functionp. 89
Physical Functionp. 89
Physical Formp. 89
Information Availability Analysis: What to Do if You Can't Measure Itp. 89
Using Information Requirements in Designp. 90
Single Variable Constraintsp. 91
Questions to Elicit Single Variable Constraintsp. 92
Functional Purposep. 92
Abstract Functionp. 92
Generalized Functionp. 92
Physical Functionp. 92
Physical Formp. 92
Using Single Variable Constraints in Designp. 92
Multivariate Constraintsp. 93
Using Multivariate Constraints in Designp. 95
Means-End Relationshipsp. 95
Using Means-End Relationships in Designp. 96
Example Design Processp. 96
Basic Design of Information Requirementsp. 96
Single Variable Constraintsp. 98
Multivariate Constraintsp. 98
Organize by Means-End Linksp. 101
Functional Information Profiles: Working with Existing Designsp. 102
Summary: From Information and Constraints to Designp. 103
Transportation Systemsp. 105
Challenges with Transportation Systemsp. 105
Analysis for Command and Control of a Frigatep. 106
System Boundaryp. 107
Work Domain Analysisp. 108
Testing a Work Domain Modelp. 113
Analysis for Command and Control of a Destroyerp. 118
System Boundaryp. 118
Work Domain Analysisp. 119
A Display for an Aircraftp. 120
System Boundaryp. 121
Work Domain Analysisp. 121
Instrumentation Availabilityp. 122
Display Designp. 123
Evaluationp. 126
An Alternative Design: Integration with HITSp. 126
A Display for Balancing Fuel in an Aircraftp. 128
System Boundaryp. 129
Work Domain Analysisp. 129
Display Designp. 130
Handling the Challengesp. 132
Determining the System Boundaryp. 132
Determining Purposep. 133
Modeling Physical Relationshipsp. 134
Modeling Social Relationshipsp. 134
The Number of Levels and Modelsp. 135
The Depth of Analysisp. 137
Analysis at Different Design Stagesp. 137
Instrumentation Availabilityp. 138
Partial Display Implementationsp. 138
Process Control Systemsp. 141
Challenges with Process Control Systemsp. 142
Design for Thermal Power Generation Systemp. 142
System Boundaryp. 142
Work Domain Analysisp. 143
Display Designp. 144
Evaluationp. 146
Design for a Nuclear Power Simulationp. 147
System Boundaryp. 148
Work Domain Analysisp. 149
Display Designp. 151
Evaluationp. 151
Design for a Pasteurizerp. 152
System Boundaryp. 153
Work Domain Analysisp. 153
Sensors and Information Availabilityp. 155
Interface Designp. 156
Evaluationp. 158
Design for an Acetylene Hydrogenation Reactorp. 159
System Boundaryp. 159
Work Domain Analysisp. 159
Part-Whole Hierarchyp. 159
Abstraction Hierarchyp. 159
Task Analysisp. 164
Interface Designp. 164
Evaluationp. 168
Alternative: Design for a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unitp. 169
Design for a Large Refineryp. 169
System Boundaryp. 169
Work Domain Analysisp. 169
Part-Whole Hierarchyp. 169
Abstraction Hierarchy for a Reactorp. 171
Interface Designp. 172
Handling the Challengesp. 173
Instrumentation or Sensor Availabilityp. 174
Part-Whole Analysis Variations with Project Sizep. 174
Using Functional, Causal, and Multilevel Flow Modelsp. 175
Organizing Information on the Displayp. 177
Adding Task Analysis Information to an EIDp. 178
Telecommunications Systemsp. 179
Challenges with Telecommunications Systemsp. 179
Analysis for Network Managementp. 180
System Boundaryp. 180
Work Domain Analysisp. 181
Functional Purposep. 181
Abstract Functionp. 182
Generalized Functionp. 183
Physical Functionp. 183
Physical Formp. 183
Deriving Information Requirements from the Analysisp. 184
Display Designp. 185
Functional Purpose Displayp. 185
Abstract Function Displayp. 187
Generalized Function Displayp. 188
Physical Function Displayp. 189
Physical Form Displayp. 191
Evaluationp. 193
An Alternative Design: Design for Scalabilityp. 193
Work Domain Analysisp. 193
Display Designp. 194
Analysis for Radio Communicationsp. 196
Work Domain Analysisp. 196
Display Designp. 196
Evaluationp. 198
Handling the Challengesp. 198
Determining System Boundaryp. 198
Determining WDA Contentp. 199
Developing a Diagnostic Graphic for a Low-Capacity Situationp. 199
Using a 3D Ecological Displayp. 200
Developing Visualizations That Scale with Large Amounts of Datap. 200
Medical Systemsp. 201
Challengesp. 202
Design for Oxygenation Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unitp. 202
System Boundaryp. 203
Work Domain Analysisp. 204
Instrumentation Availabilityp. 205
Display Designp. 207
Evaluationp. 209
Patient Monitoring in the Operating Roomp. 212
System Boundaryp. 212
Work Domain Analysisp. 213
Information Availabilityp. 216
Function Allocation Using WDAp. 217
Display Designs and Evaluationsp. 218
Blike's Displayp. 218
3D Integrated Displayp. 221
Sonification Displayp. 224
Analysis for Diabetes Managementp. 225
System Boundaryp. 225
Work Domain Analysisp. 225
Instrumentation Availabilityp. 228
Display Designp. 228
Evaluationp. 233
Handling the Challengesp. 233
How to Choose the System Boundaryp. 233
How to Decide When to Stop Decomposing of the Part-Whole Analysisp. 234
How to Integrate Medical Informationp. 235
How to Deal with Issues Associated with Sensor Limitations and Availabilityp. 235
How to Determine Information Requirements for Different Roles in the Medical Environmentp. 236
How to Extend EID to Other Sensory Modesp. 237
Social Systemsp. 239
Challengesp. 239
Casino Gamblingp. 240
System Boundaryp. 241
Work Domain Analysisp. 241
Purposesp. 241
Abstract Functionp. 241
Generalized Functionp. 242
Physical Functionp. 243
Physical Formp. 243
Display Designp. 243
Connecting Losses and Time Playedp. 243
The Dirty Dog Metaphorp. 244
Representation of the House-Patron Relationshipp. 244
Odds Visualizationp. 246
Evaluationp. 246
Handling the Challengesp. 247
Modeling Money and Valuep. 247
Modeling Two Different but Tightly Connected Domainsp. 247
Developing Entertaining Visualizationsp. 247
Using EID with Other Mehtodsp. 249
A Design Framework: Defining Opportunities to Use EID with Other Methodsp. 250
Work Environmentp. 250
Work Domainp. 251
Activitiesp. 251
People and Technologyp. 252
Interface Lifecyclep. 252
Information Requirements Generationp. 253
Interface Designp. 253
Evaluationp. 253
Design Frameworkp. 253
EID and Other Methodsp. 255
Ecological Interface Designp. 255
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 255
Cognitive Work Analysisp. 257
Examplep. 258
Discussionp. 260
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 261
Task Analysisp. 261
Examplep. 262
Discussionp. 263
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 265
Situation Awareness Analysisp. 265
Examplep. 266
Discussionp. 267
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 267
Contextual Inquiry and Designp. 267
Examplep. 268
Discussionp. 272
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 272
GOMSp. 273
Examplep. 273
Discussionp. 273
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 274
Use Case Scenario Designp. 274
Examplep. 275
Discussionp. 275
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 276
Participatory Designp. 276
Examplep. 277
Discussionp. 277
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 278
Applying User Interface Design Principlesp. 278
Examplep. 280
Discussionp. 281
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 281
Usability Evaluationp. 281
Visual Clarityp. 283
Consistencyp. 284
Compatibilityp. 284
Informative Feedbackp. 284
Explicitnessp. 284
Appropriate Functionalityp. 285
Flexibility and Controlp. 285
Error Prevention and Correctionp. 285
User Guidance and Supportp. 286
System Usability Problemsp. 286
Discussionp. 286
Mapping onto the Frameworkp. 286
Summaryp. 286
Conclusionp. 289
Referencesp. 291
Indexp. 299
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780415283748
ISBN-10: 0415283744
Audience: Tertiary; University or College
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 342
Published: 25th June 2004
Publisher: CRC PR INC
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 24.18 x 16.36  x 2.41
Weight (kg): 0.61
Edition Number: 1