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DNA and the Criminal Justice System : The Technology of Justice - David Lazer

DNA and the Criminal Justice System

The Technology of Justice

By: David Lazer (Editor), Arthur L. Caplan (Editor)

Paperback

Published: 1st November 2004
For Ages: 18+ years old
Ships: 3 to 4 business days
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Is DNA technology the ultimate diviner of guilt or the ultimate threat to civil liberties? Over the past decade, DNA has been used to exonerate hundreds and to convict thousands. Its expanded use over the coming decade promises to recalibrate significantly the balance between collective security and individual freedom. For example, it is possible that law enforcement DNA databases will expand to include millions of individuals not convicted of any crime. Moreover, depending on what rules govern access, such databases could also be used for purposes that range from determining paternity to assessing predispositions to certain diseases or behaviors. Thus the use of DNA technology will involve tough trade-offs between individual and societal interests. This book, written by a distinguished group of authors including U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, explores the ethical, procedural, and economic challenges posed by the use of DNA evidence as well as future directions for the technology. After laying the conceptual historical, legal, and scientific groundwork for the debate, the book considers bioethical issues raised by the collection of DNA, including the question of control over DNA databases. The authors then turn to the possible genetic bases of human behavior and the implications of this still-unresolved issue for the criminal justice system. Finally, the book examines the current debate over the many roles that DNA can and should play in criminal justice.

"Contributions from an assembly of preeminent experts on DNA testing make this book an extraordinary resource, one that is likely to set the agenda for science policy in this area for years to come. Gracefully written and overflowing with important and challenging insights, this book is essential reading. But its relevance extends far beyond the criminal law, since the limits and uses of DNA testing should concern us all."--David L. Faigman, Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings, and author of *Laboratory of Justice: The Supreme Court's 200-Year Struggle to Integrate Science and the Law* This book provides a rich compendium of fully up-to-date law and policy analysis, coupled with an accessible scientific narrative. It is a striking achievement, and I expect to refer to it often and with confidence that current trends, views, and perspectives, as well as the evolving state of our knowledge of legal and scientific issues relevant to criminal justice, has been amply presented." Judge Andre M. Davis, United States District Court for the District of Maryland "This book provides a rich compendium of fully up-to-date law and policy analysis, coupled with an accessible scientific narrative. It is a striking achievement, and I expect to refer to it often and with confidence that current trends, views, and perspectives, as well as the evolving state of our knowledge of legal and scientific issues relevant to criminal justice, has been amply presented."--Andre M. Davis, United States District Court for the District of Maryland

Series Forewordp. ix
Preface. DNA: Diviner of Guilt or Threat to Liberty?p. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Laying the Groundworkp. 1
Introduction: DNA and the Criminal Justice Systemp. 3
Furthering the Conversation about Science and Societyp. 13
Science and Technology of Forensic DNA Profiling: Current Use and Future Directionsp. 23
Fingerprint Identification and the Criminal Justice System: Historical Lessons for the DNA Debatep. 63
The Relative Priority that Should Be Assigned to Trial Stage DNA Issuesp. 91
Lessons from DNA: Restriking the Balance between Finality and Justicep. 109
Balancing Privacy and Securityp. 133
Genetic Privacyp. 135
Ethical and Policy Guidancep. 147
Privacy and Forensic DNA Data Banksp. 173
DNA Tests and Databases in Criminal Justice: Individual Rights and the Common Goodp. 197
Strands of Privacy: DNA Databases, Informational Privacy, and the OECD Guidelinesp. 225
DNA Databases for Law Enforcement: The Coverage Question and the Case for a Population-Wide Databasep. 247
The Coming Storm: Crime and Behavioral Geneticsp. 285
DNA and Human-Behavior Genetics: Implications for the Criminal Justice Systemp. 287
Selective Arrests, an Ever-Expanding DNA Forensic Database, and the Specter of an Early-Twenty-First-Century Equivalent of Phrenologyp. 315
Defining the Discoursep. 335
DNA's Identity Crisisp. 337
DNA and the Criminal Justice System: Consensus and Debatep. 357
List of Contributorsp. 391
Indexp. 393
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780262621861
ISBN-10: 026262186X
Series: Basic Bioethics
Audience: Professional
For Ages: 18+ years old
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 424
Published: 1st November 2004
Publisher: MIT Press Ltd
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 22.9 x 17.8  x 2.5
Weight (kg): 0.68