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Defining the Common Good : Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain - Peter N. Miller

Defining the Common Good

Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Hardcover

Published: 24th June 1994
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The theme of this book is the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain. The revolt of the North American colonies and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. These were expressed in terms of the 'common good', 'necessity', and 'community' - concepts that came to the fore in early modern European political thought and which gave expression to the problem of defining legitimate authority in a period of increasing consciousness of state power. The Americans and their British supporters argued that individuals ought to determine the common good of the community. A new theory of representation and freedom of thought defines the cutting edge of this revolutionary redefinition of the basic relationship between individual and community.

' ... Miller triumphantly succeeds in a work of sustained sophistication and remarkably wide learning ... a powerful and remarkable vision which demands attention.' Jonathan Clark, Times Literary Supplement

Acknowledgments
Introduction
The figure of Cicero
A classical landscape
State and empire
The limits of sovereignty and obligation
The common good, toleration and freedom of thought
'Alternatives' to the common good 1774-1776
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index.
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780521442596
ISBN-10: 0521442591
Series: Ideas in Context
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 488
Published: 24th June 1994
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 23.4 x 15.5  x 3.2
Weight (kg): 0.88