See the 2019 Pulitzer Prize Winners

by |April 16, 2019

The 2019 winners of America’s greatest prize for journalism and the arts have been announced in a ceremony held at Columbia University’s School of Journalism.

The Pulitzer Prizes celebrate achievements in journalism, musical composition, and literature, with past winners including Colson Whitehead (The Underground Railroad) and Andrew Sean Greer (Less).

See all of the literary winners below!


Pulitzer Prize for Fiction: The Overstory by Richard Powers

The Overstory

Nine strangers, each in different ways, become summoned by trees, brought together in a last stand to save the continent’s few remaining acres of virgin forest.

The Overstory unfolds in concentric rings of interlocking fable, ranging from antebellum New York to the late-twentieth-century Timber Wars of the Pacific Northwest and beyond, revealing a world alongside our own – vast, slow, resourceful, magnificently inventive, and almost invisible to us. This is the story of a handful of people who learn how to see that world, and who are drawn up into its unfolding catastrophe.


Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction: Amity and Prosperity by Eliza Griswold

Amity and Prosperity

In Amity and Prosperity, the prizewinning poet and journalist Eliza Griswold tells the story of the energy boom’s impact on a small town at the edge of Appalachia and one woman’s transformation from a struggling single parent to an unlikely activist.

Drawing on seven years of immersive reporting, Griswold reveals what happens when an imperiled town faces a crisis of values, and a family wagers everything on an improbable quest for justice.


Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Be With by Forrest Gander

Be With

Forrest Gander has been called one of our most formally restless poets, and the poems in Be With express a characteristically tensile energy and, as one critic noted, “the most eclectic diction since Hart Crane.”

Drawing from his experience as a translator, Forrest Gander includes in the first, powerfully elegiac section a version of a poem by the Spanish mystical poet St. John of the Cross. He continues with a long multilingual poem examining the syncretic geological and cultural history of the U.S. border with Mexico. The poems of the third section-a moving transcription of Gander’s efforts to address his mother dying of Alzheimer’s-rise from the page like hymns, transforming slowly from reverence to revelation.


Pulitzer Prize for Biography: The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke by Jeffrey C. Stewart

The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke

A tiny, fastidiously dressed man emerged from Black Philadelphia around the turn of the century to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jacob Lawrence and call them the New Negro — the creative African Americans whose art, literature, music, and drama would inspire Black people to greatness.

In The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C. Stewart offers the definitive biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance, based on the extant primary sources of his life and on interviews with those who knew him personally. Stewart’s thought-provoking biography recreates the worlds of this illustrious, enigmatic man who, in promoting the cultural heritage of Black people, became — in the process — a New Negro himself.


Pulitzer Prize for History: Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight

Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

The definitive, dramatic biography of the most important African American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era.

In this remarkable biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. Blight tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. Douglass was not only an astonishing man of words, but a thinker steeped in Biblical story and theology. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. David Blight’s Frederick Douglass affords this important American the distinguished biography he deserves.


See the rest of the Pulitzer Prize winners for 2019 here.

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About the Contributor

Olivia Fricot is the Editor of the Booktopian Blog. After finishing a soul-crushing law degree, Olivia decided that life was much better with one's nose in a book and quickly defected to the world of Austen and Woolf. You can usually find her reading (obviously), baking, writing questionable tweets, and completing a Master's degree in English literature. Just don't ask about her thesis. Olivia is on Twitter and Instagram @livfricot - follow at your own risk.

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