Writing Advice from Bestselling Authors Lee Child, Jodi Picoult and Karin Slaughter

by |December 19, 2018

Over the years, many of the world’s bestselling and most beloved authors have answered Booktopia’s infamous Ten Terrifying Questions.

Have you ever wanted to learn how to write like Michael Connelly, Jackie Collins or Ken Follett? The secrets can be found in the interviews they have done with Booktopia.  This is invaluable advice from some of the bestselling writers in the business!

Looking for some writing tips from Lee Child, Jodi Picoult or Karin Slaughter? No problem! They have all bravely answered Booktopia’s Ten Terrifying Questions.  Lets see what they have to say …

Question: What Advice Do You Give Aspiring Writers?  


LEE CHILD


“Ignore all advice. There’s room for only one mind on your side of the transaction, and it needs to be yours and yours alone.”

 Click here for Lee Child’s the full interview


JODI PICOULT


“Write, every day. Even if it’s just for 20 minutes. Don’t answer the phone, don’t talk to your mother, etc. Take a workshop writing course, so you learn to give and get criticism and be your own best editor. And when you reach the point where you think your story is truly the worst piece of garbage created and want to throw it out…don’t.

What you’re REALLY afraid of is finishing and finding out you’re not as good as you assumed you are. Instead, you should finish that story and edit it until it is flawless, and something you’re satisfied with. Otherwise, you’ll never believe you can actually finish any piece of fiction. And read. A ton. It will inspire you to be just as clever, prolific, and eye-opening as the authors you admire.”

Click here for Jodi Picoult’s the full interview


KARIN SLAUGHTER


“It seems really simple, but I always tell them to read. You might be surprised how many will say, “I don’t have time,” or “I’m too busy writing.” Reading is important to everyone—it trains our minds to question what we are told, it hones cognitive abilities.

If you are a writer, reading gives you a sense or rhythm and how story works. Even if it’s a bad book or a silly book, you’re always learning something. And it’s very easy to spot the writers who aren’t reading, because they basically write the same book again and again. You’ll never grow as a writer—or (dare I say!) as a person—if you do not read.”

Click here for Karin Slaughter’s full interview

 


Bestsellers of the Week

1. The Land Before Avocado by Richard Glover

2. Any Ordinary Day by Leigh Sales

3. Becoming by Michelle Obama

4. Ottolenghi SIMPLE by Yotam Ottolenghi

5. The Barefoot Investor 2018 Update by Scott Pape

6. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

7. The Ice Monster by David Walliams

8. The Lost Man by Jane Harper

9. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

10. Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak

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About the Contributor

Sarah McDuling is Booktopia's Senior Content Producer and Editor of The Booktopian Blog. She has been in the bookselling game for almost a decade and a dedicated booklover since birth (potentially longer). At her happiest when reading a book, Sarah also enjoys talking/writing/tweeting about books. In her spare time, she often likes to buy a lot of books and take photographs of books. You can follow her on Twitter and Instragram @sarahmcduling

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