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Biology of Chrysomelidae : SERIES ENTOMOLOGICA - Pierre H. Jolivet

Biology of Chrysomelidae

SERIES ENTOMOLOGICA

By: Pierre H. Jolivet (Editor), E. Petitpierre (Editor), T.H. Hsiao (Editor)

Hardcover Published: 31st October 1988
ISBN: 9789061936558
Number Of Pages: 615

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As in most groups of insects, scientific research on the Chrysomelidae began in Europe in 1758, with the description of a few genera and species by the Scandinavian entomologists C. von Linne, I.C. Fabricius, and others. As the 19th century dawned, many systematic entomologists took up the study of chrysomelid beetles, together with other groups of beetles, and many new species and genera were described from all parts of the world. This trend has, of course, continued down to the present time. However, researches on the Chrysomelidae did not remain restricted to systematics, and many new lines of study have been followed, especially in the present century, by workers who have benefitted from the advances made in related fields of pure and applied entomology. Much has been achieved in the study of the Chrysomelidae, as elsewhere, and it is the aim of the present book to provide a summary and guide to these achievements. It is also to be expected that this book will provide a stimulus for further studies on the Chrysomelidae, so that we can anticipate continuing progress in our knowledge and understanding of this group through the endeavours of an ever-increasing number of scientists. I offer my congratulations to all concerned in the preparation of this book and my best wishes for its success.

`The printing and the get up of the book are excellent and the book will be of great interest to biologists and entomologists in general, particularly to taxonomists, ecologists, economic entomologists and pest management specialists.' V. Gupta, Oriental Insects, Vol. 24, 1990

1. Trophic Selection.- 1. Food Habits and Food Selection of Chrysomelidae. Bionomic and Evolutionary Perspectives.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Food selection among the subfamilies.- 2.1. Section Eupoda.- 2.1.1. Sagrinae.- 2.1.2 Aulacoscelinae.- 2.1.3. Orsodacninae.- 2.1.4. Zeugophorinae.- 2.1.5. Donaciinae.- 2.1.6. Megalopodinae.- 2.1.7. Criocerinae.- 2.1.8. Synetinae.- 2.2. Section Camptosoma.- 2.2.1 Clytrinae.- 2.2.2 Cryptocephalinae.- 2.2.3 Chlamisinae.- 2.3. Section Cyclica.- 2.3.1 Lamprosomatinae.- 2.3.2 Megascelinae.- 2.3.3 Eumolpinae.- 2.4. Section Trichostoma.- 2.4.1 Chrysomelinae.- 2.4.2 Galerucinae.- 2.4.3 Alticinae.- 2.5 Section Cryptostoma.- 2.5.1. Hispinae.- 2.5.2. Cassidinae.- 3. Economic importance.- 4. Evolutionary perspectives.- 5. Concluding remarks.- 2. Crucifer-Feeding Chrysomel1dae: Mechanisms of Host Plant Finding and Acceptance.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Distribution of crucifer feeding within Chrysomelidae.- 3. Chemicals from the Cruciferae influencing insect behaviour and performance.- 4. Factors affecting suitability of plants.- 5. Factors influencing acceptability of plants.- 6. Behaviour involved in host plant acceptance.- 7. Habitat finding.- 8. Host plant finding.- 9. Examining the plant and initiation of feeding.- 10. Feeding and oviposition.- 11. Host plant specificity.- 12. Concluding remarks.- 3. Feeding Stimulants of Leaf Beetles.- 1. Introduction.- 2. The role of chemicals in the feeding behaviour of phytophagous insects.- 3. The feeding stimulants of leaf beetles.- 3.1. Volatile secondary plant substances.- 3.2. Primary plant substances (nutrient chemicals).- 3.3. Non-volatile secondary plant substances.- 3.3.1 Cucurbitaceae-feeding leaf beetles.- 3.3.2. Cruciferae-feeding leaf beetles.- 3.3.3. Polygonaceae-feeding leaf beetles.- 3.3.4. Colorado potato beetle.- 3.3.5. Other leaf beetles.- 4. The role of secondary plant substances in the feeding behaviour of leaf beetles.- 4. Host Plants and Defense mechanisms in Oedionychina (Alticinae).- 1. Introduction.- 2. Host-plant relationships.- 3. Laboratory feeding preferences.- 4. Anti-predator adaptations.- 5. Mimicry.- 5. Leaf-Beetle Community Structure in an Amazonian Rainforest Canopy.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Field methods.- 3. Analytical methods.- 4. Results.- 5. Discussion.- 6. The Chrysomelidae: A Useful Group for Investigating Herbivore-Herbivore Interaction.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Interference competition.- 3. Exploitative competition.- 4. Changes in plant chemistry.- 5. Changes in plant architecture.- 6. Herbivore associations.- 7. Evidence for herbivore-herbivore interactions.- 2. Biogeography.- 7. Zoogeography of the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Material and field work.- 3. Regionality of the fauna of Chrysomelidae by subfamily composition.- 4. Seasonal changes of subfamily composition in Sri Lanka.- 8. The Origins of the Alticinae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Continental drift.- 3. Neotropical region.- 4. Nearctic region.- 5. Palaearctic region.- 6. Oriental region.- 7. Australian region.- 8. African region.- 9. Conclusions.- 3. Genetics and Evolution.- 9. Cytogenetics. Cytotaxonomy and Genetics of Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Chromosome numbers and karyotypic architecture.- 3. Meiotic systems.- 4. Sex chromosomes.- 5. Cytotaxonomy.- 6. Genetics.- 7. Perspectives and future researches.- 10. Chromosome Numbers and Meioformulae of Chrysomelidae.- 11. Cytotaxonomy of Alticinae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. The ancestral chromosome number.- 3. Chromosomal vs. extrachromosomal cellular parameters.- 4. Groups with Xyp or its fully pairing derivatives.- 5. Groups with inherent sex univalents.- 5.1. Alticini and Hermaeophagina.- 5.2. Oedionychini.- 6. Conclusions.- 12. Genetics of the Two Colour Forms of Chrysolina Aurichalcea (Mannerheim) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and their Gene Frequencies in Two Mountainous Areas of Central Honshu, Japan.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Material and methods.- 2.1. Crossing of the cyaneus-form and the cupreous-form.- 2.2. Sampling of field populations and estimation of gene frequency.- 3. Results.- 3.1. Crossing experiments.- 3.2. Mate choice.- 3.3. Frequency of the two colour in field populations.- 3.4. Annual changes in the frequency of the two colour forms.- 4. Discussion.- 13. Genetics of Chelymorpha Cribraria, Cassidinae: Colour Patterns and their Ecological Meanings.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Chelymorpha cribraria.- 3. Genetics of colour-pattern.- 4. Mimicry rings.- 5. Defense mechanisms and predation.- 6. The evolution of the polymorphism.- 7. Concluding remarks.- 4. Defense Mechanisms.- 14. Chemical Defense in the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Modes of release.- 3. Defensive allomones of the adults.- 4. Defensive allomones of the larvae.- 5. Defensive allomones of the pupae.- 6. Defensive allomones of the eggs.- 7. Origin and biosynthesis of defensive allomones in leaf beetles.- 7.1. Adult allomones.- 7.2. Larval allomones.- 8. The efficiency of chemical defense.- 9. Conclusion and overview.- 15. Larval Gregariousness in the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Possible functions of larval gregariousness.- 3. Mechanisms of larval gregarious behaviour.- 4. Conclusion.- 16. Mimicry and the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Protective (defense) mimicry.- 2.1. Poisonous species or species possessing repellent secretions.- 2.2. Mullerian mimicry.- 2.3. Eye-spots.- 2.4. Collective mimicry.- 2.5. Adventitious mimicry.- 2.5.1. Thanatosis.- 3. Aggressive mimicry.- 3.1. Serendipitous mimicry.- 3.2. Actual vs. deceptive disappearance.- 3.3. Aggressive mimicry.- 4. Sexual dimorphism and mimicry.- 4.1. Sex-limited mimicry.- 4.2. Ants.- 4.3. Stridulation.- 5. Colour changes in adult Chrysomelids.- 5.1. Durability of mimicry.- 17. The Jumping Apparatus of Flea Beetles (Alticinae) - The Metafemoral Spring.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Spring anatomy.- 3. Spring function.- 4. Spring Morpho-groups.- 5. Application.- 6. Alticine relationships.- 5. Anatomy and Reproduction.- 18. Localization of Spermatozoa Inside Viviparous and Ovirparous Females of Chrysomelinae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Comparative study of spermatheca between oviparous and viviparous females.- 2.1. Anatomy of spermatheca.- 2.2. Capacity of spermatheca.- 3. Extra-spermatheca localization of spermatozoa.- 3.1. Migration of spermatozoa in Oreina luctuosa.- 3.2. Migration of spermatozoa among other species.- 4. Localization of spermatozoa within females lacking spermatheca.- 5. Locus of fertilization.- 6. Conclusion.- 19. Comparative Morphology of the Internal Reproductive System of the Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera).- 1. Introduction.- 2. Gross morphology and homology.- 2.1. The male organs.- 2.1.1. The testis.- 2.1.2. The vas deferens.- 2.1.3. The ejaculatory duct.- 2.1.4. The accessory gland.- 2.2. The female organs.- 2.2.1. The ovary.- 2.2.2. The lateral oviduct.- 2.2.3. The common oviduct.- 2.2.4. The spermathecal organ.- 2.2.5. The accessory gland of the ovipositor.- 3. Comparative morphology.- 3.1. Subfamily Orsodacninae (C.G. Thomson 1866).- 3.2. Subfamily Zeugophorinae (Chujo 1952).- 3.3. Subfamily Megalopodinae (Lacordaire 1845).- 3.4. Subfamily Sagrinae (Jacoby 1908).- 3.5. Subfamily Donaciinae (Kirby 1837).- 3.6. Subfamily Criocerinae (Lacordaire 1845).- 3.7. Subfamily Synetinae (Edwards 1953).- 3.8. Subfamily Chrysomelinae (Lacordaire 1845).- 3.9. Subfamily Galerucinae (Chevrolat 1845).- 3.10. Subfamily Alticinae (Allard 1865).- 3.11. Subfamily Clytrinae (Blanchard 1846).- 3.12. Subfamily Cryptocephaline (Chapuis 1874).- 3.13. Subfamily Chlamisinae (Gressitt 1946).- 3.14. Subfamily Lamprosomatinae (Lacordaire) 1848).- 3.15. Subfamily Hispinae (Baly 1858).- 3.16. Subfamily Cassidinae (Stephens 1931).- 3.17. Subfamily Eumolpinae (Chapuis 1874).- 3.18. Subfamily megascelinae (Jacoby 1908).- 4. Phylogenetic relationships among the subfamilies.- 20. Sperm Structure and Phylogeny of the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Material and methods.- 3. Observations.- 3.1. The general features of Chrysomelidae spermatozoon.- 3.2. Cassidinae.- 3.3. Zeugophorinae.- 3.4. Chrysomelidae.- 3.5. Criocerinae.- 3.6. Clytrinae.- 3.7. Cryptocephalinae.- 3.8. Hispinae.- 3.9. Galerucinae.- 3.10. Donaciinae.- 3.11. Alticinae.- 4. Concluding remarks.- 6. Natural Enemies.- 21. Viruses and Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Entomopathogenic viruses.- 3. The viruses.- 4. Plant pathogenic viruses.- 4.1. The vectors.- 4.2. The viruses.- 4.3. Feeding methods.- 5. Virus transmission.- 6. Interaction between plant viruses and their vectors.- 7. Summary.- 22. Laboulbeniales (Ascomycetes) Parasitic on Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Catalogue.- 2.1. On Criocerinae.- 2.2. On Cryptocephalinae.- 2.3. On Eumolpinae.- 2.4. On Chrysomelinae.- 2.5. On Galerucinae.- 2.6. On Alticinae.- 2.7. On Hispinae.- 2.8. On Cassidinae.- 23. Microsporida of the Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Identification.- 2.1. Light microscopy.- 2.1.1. Wet smear.- 2.1.2. Straining with Giemsa stain.- 2.1.3. Staining with Delamater's basic Fuchsine.- 2.1.4. Series of sections.- 2.2. Transmission electron microsopy.- 2.3. Scanning electron microsopy.- 3. List of microsporidans from Chrysomelidae.- 4. Host-parasite relationship.- 4.1. Invasion of host.- 4.2. Effects on the host.- 4.2.1. Lysis of parasitised tissue.- 4.2.2. Hypertrophy of infested cells.- 4.2.3. Reduced fertility of eggs.- 4.2.4. Perturbation of growth.- 4.3. Defence reaction of host.- 5. Microsporidians in Chrysomelidae as biological control agents.- 5.1. Production of spores.- 5.2. Storage of spores.- 5.3. Transmission of infestation.- 5.4. Specificity.- 5.5. Conservation and distribution in natural populations of hosts.- 6. Conclusions.- 24. Gregarines of Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Systematics and biogeography.- 2.1. Gregarinidae.- 2.2. Hirmocystidae.- 2.3. Actinocephalidae.- 2.4. Gregarines Incertae sedis.- 3. Action on the hosts.- 4. Phylogenetical considerations.- 5. A recapitulative list of the gregarines of Chrysomelidae.- 25. Nematode Parasites of Chrysomelidae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Bionomics of nematode groups naturally associated with Chrysomelidae.- 2.1. Mermithidae.- 2.1.1. Life cycle.- 2.1.2. Host specificity.- 2.1.3. Defense reactions.- 2.2. Allantonematidae.- 2.2.1. Life cycle.- 2.2.2. Host specificity.- 2.2.3. Defense reactions.- 2.3. Rhabditidae.- 2.3.1. Life cycle.- 2.3.2. Host specificity.- 2.3.3. Defense reactions.- 3. Application of nematodes for biological control of Chrysomelidae.- 26. The Parasitoids of Hispinae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Leaf-mining Hispinae.- 2.1. Coelaenomenodera.- 2.1.1. C. minuta.- 2.1.2. Coeluenumenodera perrieri Fuirmaire.- 2.2. Promecotheca.- 2.3. Hispolepsis.- 3. Leaf-eating Hispinae.- 3.1. Asian species.- 3.2. American species.- 3.3. Madagascan species.- 4. Conclusion.- 7. Bionomics and Miscellaneous Topics.- 27. Chrysomelids and Ants.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Defense stratagems of Chrysomelids.- 2.1. Eggs.- 2.2. Larvae.- 2.3. Pupae.- 2.4. Adults.- 3. Commensalism.- 4. Discussion and conclusions.- 28. The Criocerinae: Biology. Phylogeny and Evolution.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Biology.- 2.1. General remarks.- 2.2. Host plants.- 2.3. Development and phenologies: predators and parasites.- 2.4. Competition avoidance.- 2.5. Stridulation.- 3. Phylogeny.- 4. Evolution.- 29. Biology of Oulema.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Life history and diapause.- 3. Movement and genetic variation.- 4. Insect-plant interactions.- 5. Plant resistance.- 5.1. Chemical resistance.- 5.2. Physical resistance.- 30. Biology of Camptosomata. Clytrinae - Cryptocephalinae - Chlamisinae Lamprosomatinae.- 1. General characteristics.- 2. Habits of Camptosomata.- 2.1. Adults.- 2.2. Larvae.- 2.3. Camptosomata as pests and as biocontrol agents.- 3. Characteristics features of the life-cycle.- 4. Comparative details of oviposition and development within the Camptosomata.- 4.1. Rectal apparatus and egg dimple.- 4.2. Oviposition.- 4.3. Shapes of the egg-cases.- 4.4. Time taken for the production of egg-cases.- 4.5. Number of eggs per female.- 4.6. Embryonic period.- 4.7. Shapes of the larval cases.- 4.8. The building material of the egg and larval cases.- 4.9. Morphological characteristics of the larvae.- 4.10. Ecdysis.- 4.11. Pupation.- 4.12. Length of the pupal period.- 5. Duration of the life-cycle.- 6. Enemies of the Camptosomata.- 31. Eumolpinae Associated with Cacao Trees (Theobroma Cacao l.) in Southeast Bahia.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Feeding habitats of Eumolpinae adults and larvae in the cacao plantation.- 3. Biological aspects of Percolaspis ornata (Germar 1824).- 3.1. Eggs, oviposition, and fecundity.- 3.2. Larva.- 3.2.1. General appearance.- 3.2.2. Laboratory rearing.- 3.3. Pupae.- 3.4. Adults.- 4. Natural enemies.- 32. Biology of Neotropical Cassidinae.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Parasitism.- 3. Predation.- 4. Parental care.- 5. Colour changes.- 6. Morphological, ecological and distributional characteristics.- 6.1 Tribe Delocraniini.- 6.2. Tribe Hemisphaerotini.- 6.3. Tribe Imatidiini.- 6.4. Tribe Omocerini.- 6.5. Tribe Goniocheniini.- 6.6. Tribe Dorynotini.- 6.7. Tribe Stolaini.- 6.8. Tribe Ischyrosonichini.- 6.9. Tribe Physonotini.- 6.10. Tribe Cassidini.- 6.11. Tribe Charidotini.- 33. Host Specificity, Seasonality and Bionomics of Leptinotarsa Beetles.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Taxonomy relationship with related genera.- 3. Pattern of host plant affinity.- 4. Life history and bionomics.- 5. Seasonal adaptation.- 6. Mechanism of host plant selection and specificity.- 7. Concluding remarks.- Authors Index.- Taxonomic Index.

ISBN: 9789061936558
ISBN-10: 9061936551
Series: SERIES ENTOMOLOGICA
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 615
Published: 31st October 1988
Publisher: Springer
Country of Publication: NL
Dimensions (cm): 25.4 x 17.15  x 3.18
Weight (kg): 1.27