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Audio and Hi-Fi Handbook - Ian Sinclair

Audio and Hi-Fi Handbook

By: Ian Sinclair (Editor)

Paperback Published: 14th November 2000
ISBN: 9780750649759
Number Of Pages: 464

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Written by a team of experts and specialist contributors, this comprehensive guide has proved to be an invaluable resource for professional designers and service engineers.
Each chapter is written by a leading author, including Don Aldous, Nick Beer, John Borwick, Dave Berriman, John Linsley Hood, Geoff Lewis and John Watkinson, which provides as wide a perspective as possible on high-quality sound reproduction as well as a wealth of expertise.
The third edition includes new chapters on servicing, Nicam stereo and digital satellite radio. For the first time in paperback, this revised edition features a completely new chapter on the most recent digital developments, CD-R/RW, HDCD, Internet audio, MP3 players and DAM-CD.
Ian Sinclair has written over 140 books on aspects of electronics and computing and has been a regular contributor to the electronics and computing press.
A comprehensive - and comprehensible - guide to audio electronics
Enables enthusiasts to understand and modify their Hi-fi equipment
Electronics and design principles make this book a handy reference tool for anyone involved in audio design, manufacture, installation and use.

Prefacep. xi
Sound Wavesp. 1
Pure tones and complex waveformsp. 1
Random noisep. 2
Decibelsp. 2
Sound in roomsp. 3
Reverberationp. 4
Reverberation, intelligibility and musicp. 4
Studio and listening room acousticsp. 4
The ear and hearingp. 5
Perception of intensity and frequencyp. 6
Pitch perceptionp. 7
Discrimination and maskingp. 7
Binaural hearingp. 8
The Haas effectp. 8
Distortionp. 9
Electronic noise absorbersp. 12
Referencesp. 12
Microphonesp. 14
Introductionp. 14
Microphone characteristicsp. 14
Microphone typesp. 16
The microphone as a voltage generatorp. 18
Microphones for stereop. 24
Surround soundp. 27
Referencesp. 27
Studio and Control Room Acousticsp. 28
Introductionp. 28
Noise controlp. 28
Studio and control room acousticsp. 33
Principles of Digital Audiop. 41
Introductionp. 41
Analogue and digitalp. 41
Elementary logic processesp. 43
The significance of bits and bobsp. 44
Transmitting digital signalsp. 46
The analogue audio waveformp. 47
Arithmeticp. 51
Digital filteringp. 54
Other binary operationsp. 58
Sampling and quantisingp. 58
Transform and masking codersp. 65
Bibliographyp. 65
Compact Disc Technologyp. 67
Introductionp. 67
The compact disc ... some basic factsp. 67
The compact disc ... what information it containsp. 68
Quantisation errorsp. 69
Aliasing noisep. 69
Error correctionp. 71
How are the errors corrected?p. 71
Interleavingp. 72
Control wordp. 73
Eight to fourteen modulationp. 74
Compact disc constructionp. 74
The eight to fourteen modulation processp. 77
Coupling bitsp. 77
Pit lengthsp. 77
Sync. wordp. 78
Optical assemblyp. 80
Servo circuitsp. 84
The decoderp. 86
Digital filtering and digital to analogue conversionp. 87
Bibliographyp. 92
Digital Audio Recordingp. 93
Types of mediap. 93
Recording media comparedp. 96
Some digital audio processes outlinedp. 97
Hard disk recordersp. 104
The PCM adaptorp. 105
An open reel digital recorderp. 106
Rotary head digital recordersp. 107
Digital compact cassettep. 110
Editing digital audio tapep. 110
Bibliographyp. 111
Tape Recordingp. 112
The basic systemp. 112
The magnetic tapep. 112
The recording processp. 113
Sources of non-uniformity in frequency responsep. 114
Record/replay equalisationp. 116
Head designp. 117
Recording track dimensionsp. 120
HF biasp. 120
The tape transport mechanismp. 123
Transient performancep. 123
Tape noisep. 124
Electronic circuit designp. 125
Replay equalisationp. 127
The bias oscillatorp. 129
The record amplifierp. 130
Recording level indicationp. 131
Tape drive controlp. 131
Professional tape recording equipmentp. 131
General descriptionp. 132
Multi-track machinesp. 133
Digital recording systemsp. 134
Recommended further readingp. 138
Noise Reduction Systemsp. 139
Introductionp. 139
Non-complementary systemsp. 140
Complementary systemsp. 142
Emphasisp. 142
Companding systemsp. 143
The Dolby A systemp. 147
Telecom C4p. 148
dbxp. 148
Dolby Bp. 149
Dolby Cp. 150
Dolby SRp. 152
Dolby Sp. 155
Bibliographyp. 156
The Vinyl Discp. 157
Introductionp. 157
Backgroundp. 157
Summary of major steps and processesp. 157
The lathep. 158
Cutting the acetatep. 158
In pursuit of qualityp. 160
The influence of digital processingp. 161
Disc cutting--problems and solutionsp. 161
Disc pressingp. 162
Disc reproductionp. 163
Drive systemsp. 163
Pick-up arms and cartridgesp. 165
The cartridge/arm combinationp. 165
Stylip. 167
Specificationsp. 168
Measurement methodsp. 169
Maintaining old recordingsp. 169
Referencesp. 170
Valve Amplifiersp. 171
Who uses valves and why?p. 171
Subjectivism and objectivismp. 172
Fixed pattern noisep. 172
What is a valve?p. 172
Valve models and AC parametersp. 174
Practical circuit examplesp. 176
Other circuits and sources of informationp. 183
Tuners and Radio Receiversp. 186
Backgroundp. 186
Basic requirements for radio receptionp. 186
The influence of the ionospherep. 187
Why VHF transmissions?p. 188
AM or FM?p. 189
FM broadcast standardsp. 190
Stereo encoding and decodingp. 190
The Zenith-GE 'pilot tone' stereophonic systemp. 190
The BBC pulse code modulation (PCM) programme distribution systemp. 192
Supplementary broadcast signalsp. 195
Alternative transmission methodsp. 195
Radio receiver designp. 196
Circuit designp. 212
New developmentsp. 213
BBC transmitted MF and VHF signal parametersp. 214
The 57 KHz sub-carrier radio data system (RDS)p. 214
Pre-amps and Inputsp. 215
Requirementsp. 215
Signal voltage and impedance levelsp. 215
Gramophone pick-up inputsp. 216
Input circuitryp. 217
Moving coil PU head amplifier designp. 219
Circuit arrangementsp. 219
Input connectionsp. 223
Input switchingp. 223
Voltage Amplifiers and Controlsp. 226
Preamplifier stagesp. 226
Linearityp. 226
Noise levelsp. 230
Output voltage characteristicsp. 230
Voltage amplifier design techniquesp. 231
Constant-current sources and 'current mirrors'p. 232
Performance standardsp. 235
Audibility of distortion componentsp. 237
General design considerationsp. 239
Controlsp. 240
Power Output Stagesp. 252
Valve-operated amplifier designsp. 252
Early transistor power amplifier designsp. 253
Listener fatigue and crossover distortionp. 253
Improved transistor output stage designp. 255
Power MOSFET output devicesp. 255
Output transistor protectionp. 258
Power output and power dissipationp. 259
General power amplifier design considerationsp. 261
Slew-rate limiting and transient intermodulation distortionp. 262
Advanced amplifier designsp. 263
Alternative design approachesp. 269
Contemporary amplifier design practicep. 272
Sound quality and specificationsp. 274
Loudspeakersp. 276
Radiation of soundp. 276
Characteristic impedancep. 277
Radiation impedancep. 277
Radiation from a pistonp. 277
Directivityp. 277
Sound pressure produced at distance rp. 277
Electrical analoguep. 279
Diaphragm/suspension assemblyp. 280
Diaphragm sizep. 280
Diaphragm profilep. 281
Straight-sided conesp. 282
Materialp. 283
Soft domesp. 284
Suspensionsp. 284
Voice coilp. 285
Moving coil loudspeakerp. 285
Motional impedancep. 286
Referencesp. 289
Loudspeaker Enclosuresp. 290
Fundamentalsp. 290
Infinite bafflep. 290
Reflex cabinetsp. 292
Labyrinth enclosuresp. 295
Professional systemsp. 296
Networksp. 296
Componentsp. 298
Ribbon loudspeakerp. 298
Wide range ribbon systemsp. 299
Pressure drive unitsp. 300
Electrostatic loudspeakers (ESL)p. 303
Headphonesp. 310
A brief historyp. 310
Pros and cons of headphone listeningp. 310
Headphone typesp. 311
Basic headphone typesp. 314
Measuring headphonesp. 316
The futurep. 317
Public Address and Sound Reinforcementp. 319
Introductionp. 319
Signal distributionp. 319
Loudspeakers for public address and sound reinforcementp. 322
Cone driver units/cabinet loudspeakersp. 322
Loudspeaker systems and coveragep. 325
Speech intelligibilityp. 328
Signal (time) delay systemsp. 330
Equalisers and sound system equalisationp. 332
Compressor-limiters and other signal processing equipmentp. 333
Amplifiers and mixersp. 334
Cinema systems and miscellaneous applicationsp. 335
References and bibliographyp. 336
In-Car Audiop. 337
Modern car audiop. 337
FM car receptionp. 337
Power amplifiersp. 338
Separate power ampsp. 339
Multi-speaker replayp. 340
Ambisonicsp. 340
Cassette playersp. 341
Compact discp. 343
Digital audio tapep. 344
Loudspeakersp. 345
Installationp. 352
The future for in-car audiop. 360
Sound Synthesisp. 362
Electronic sound sourcesp. 362
Synthesizers, simple and complexp. 362
Radiophonics and sound workshopsp. 363
Problems of working with totally artificial waveformsp. 366
Computers and synthesizers (MIDI and MSX)p. 368
Mode messagesp. 373
Real timep. 376
Referencesp. 377
Interconnectionsp. 378
Target and scope of the chapterp. 378
Basic physical backgroundp. 378
Resistance and electrical effects of currentp. 381
Capacitive effectsp. 383
Magnetic effectsp. 384
Characteristic impedancep. 387
Reactive componentsp. 388
Interconnection techniquesp. 390
Connectorsp. 397
NICAM Stereo and Satellite Radio Systemsp. 404
The signal structure of the NICAM-728 systemp. 404
The NICAM-728 receiverp. 406
The DQPSK docoderp. 407
Satellite-delivered digital radio (ASTRA digital radio ADR)p. 407
Coded orthogonal frequency division multiplex (CODFM)p. 411
The JPL digital systemp. 413
Reality of digital sound broadcastingp. 414
Modern Audio and Hi-Fi Servicingp. 415
Mechanism trendsp. 415
Circuit trendsp. 417
Tunersp. 418
Power suppliesp. 418
System controlp. 419
Microprocessorsp. 419
Amplifiersp. 419
Discrete output stage failuresp. 422
Digital signal processingp. 423
Mini-discp. 423
Test modesp. 424
Surface mounted and VLSI devicesp. 424
Obsolete formatsp. 425
Software problemsp. 425
Good servicing practicep. 426
Test equipmentp. 426
Conclusionp. 426
Other Digital Audio Devicesp. 427
Video Recordersp. 427
HDCDp. 427
CD Writersp. 427
MPEG Systemsp. 432
MP3p. 434
Transcribing a Recording by Computerp. 435
WAV onwardsp. 436
DAM CDp. 437
DVD and Audiop. 437
Indexp. 441
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780750649759
ISBN-10: 0750649755
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 464
Published: 14th November 2000
Publisher: BUTTERWORTH-HEINEMANN
Country of Publication: GB
Dimensions (cm): 24.61 x 18.9  x 2.44
Weight (kg): 0.84
Edition Number: 3
Edition Type: Revised

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