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Advanced Technology for Road Transport : IVHS and ATT - Ian Catling

Advanced Technology for Road Transport

IVHS and ATT

By: Ian Catling (Editor)

Hardcover

Published: 1st December 1994
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Better understand the application of telematics to road transport, including the latest ITS/ATT developments in the US, Europe, and Japan with this book. It concentrates on key developments in road transport technology, particularly on advances that will affect the way in which people travel over the next decade.

Introduction to ATT, IVHS, and RTIp. 1
What Is Advanced Transport Telematics?p. 1
History of ATTp. 3
Driver Informationp. 3
Dynamic Driver Informationp. 3
Automatic Debitingp. 5
Automated Drivingp. 6
ATT Programsp. 7
ATT Applicationsp. 9
ATT Implementationp. 10
Structure of the Bookp. 14
Referencesp. 15
System Architecture and Communicationsp. 17
Introductionp. 17
System Architecturep. 18
Role of the Architectp. 18
Nonarchitectural Approachp. 19
Benefits of an Open RTI Architecturep. 19
Which Parts of an RTI System Should Be Open?p. 20
ISO ODP System Architecture Projectionsp. 21
Alternative Architectural Representationsp. 23
Communication Systemsp. 24
OSI Reference Modelp. 24
Mobile Data Transfer Modesp. 28
Application of the ISO ODP Model to RTI Systemsp. 30
RTI Enterprisep. 30
Information Architecturep. 33
RTI Technology Modelp. 34
Dynamic Route Guidance Architecturep. 34
Communications Requirements for RTI Applicationsp. 36
Suitable Bearer Networksp. 38
Beaconsp. 38
Downlink-Only Networksp. 39
Mobile Data Systemsp. 40
Convergence of Communication Systemsp. 42
Conclusionsp. 46
Referencesp. 47
Traffic Controlp. 49
Introductionp. 49
Urban Traffic Controlp. 50
Discrete Time Optimizationp. 51
Trilevel Approachp. 51
Junction Control Systemsp. 52
Network Control Systemsp. 52
Highway Controlp. 55
Incident Detection and Congestion Monitoringp. 55
Ramp Meteringp. 57
Variable-Message Signsp. 58
Integration With Dynamic Route Guidancep. 59
Integration With Public Transportp. 62
Conclusionsp. 63
Referencesp. 63
Cooperative Transport with EURO-SCOUT
Dynamic Guidance by Individual Information and Linkage with Other Servicesp. 65
Dynamic Route Guidance over Time-Optimized Routesp. 65
Dynamic Alternative (Modal Split): PandR and Public Transportp. 67
Trip Planning--Future Servicep. 70
Dynamic Parking Managementp. 70
Urban Goods Transport (Fleet Management)p. 70
Hazard Reportsp. 71
Tourist Informationp. 71
Collective Informationp. 71
Variable-Message Signsp. 71
Traffic-Signal Installationsp. 72
Methods, Advantages, and Problems of Integrationp. 73
Areas of Cooperationp. 73
Database Integrationp. 73
Extraurban and Urban Trafficp. 75
Road Traffic and Public Transportp. 75
Regional and Local Authorities and Service Companiesp. 76
Munich Cooperative Transport Managementp. 76
POLIS Initiativep. 76
Status of the Projectp. 76
Financing Modelp. 76
Conclusionp. 78
Referencesp. 78
DRIVE and the ATT Programp. 79
ATT in Europep. 79
What Conditions Have Stimulated ATT in Europe?p. 79
What Conditions Have Deterred ATT in Europe?p. 80
Where Has the Initiative for ATT Come from In Europe?p. 81
Importance of Public-Private Interplay for the Implementation of ATT Systemsp. 82
What Are the Most Useful Steps to Derive Social Benefit from ATT in Europe?p. 85
Validation of RandD Results Through Pilot Projectsp. 86
Preparation of the Infrastructurep. 92
Common Key Actionsp. 93
Acknowledgementsp. 97
Referencesp. 97
SOCRATESp. 99
Introductionp. 99
Basic SOCRATES Principles and Applicationsp. 100
The SOCRATES Project in the First DRIVE Programp. 104
Traffic Modeling and Traffic Managementp. 105
Communicationsp. 106
System Designp. 106
In-Vehicle Equipmentp. 106
Test Sitep. 106
The Four SOCRATES Projects in the DRIVE II Programp. 109
SOCRATES Kernel Projectp. 109
SOCRATES Pilot Projectsp. 110
Partners in the SOCRATES Projectsp. 111
Applications in the Pilot Projectsp. 111
Some Major Areas of SOCRATES Technical Developmentp. 113
Communications Protocolsp. 113
Application Centersp. 113
Communication System Modelingp. 114
Application Codingp. 114
Location Codingp. 114
Dynamic Route Planningp. 114
Man-Machine Interface (MMI)p. 115
DRIVE Normalized Transmission (DNT)p. 115
SOCRATES Proposal for a GSM General Packet Radio Servicep. 115
Assessment of the Pilot Projectsp. 116
SOCRATES Commercial Activitiesp. 117
Referencesp. 118
Automatic Toll Collection for Pricing the Use of Road Space--Using Microwave Communications Technologyp. 119
Introduction and Backgroundp. 119
Overviewp. 119
The Automation of Toll Collectionp. 120
The PAMELA Projectp. 121
Objectives of the PAMELA Projectp. 121
Automatic Chargingp. 122
Anonymity of the Transactionp. 124
An Outline of the PAMELA Systemp. 125
System Requirementsp. 125
Description of the Systemp. 125
Field Trials of the PAMELA Systemp. 132
Paris-Normandie Autoroutep. 132
Car Parking Management and Debiting in Lisbonp. 134
Multilane Experiments in Swedenp. 134
Future of the PAMELA System: the ADEPT Projectp. 137
Objectives of the ADEPT Projectp. 137
Technical Approach of the ADEPT Projectp. 137
Issuesp. 139
Different Approaches to Demand Management Through Pricingp. 139
Integration With Other RTI Applicationsp. 141
Conclusionsp. 143
Acknowledgmentsp. 143
Referencesp. 143
Major DRIVE/ATT Pilot Projectsp. 145
Introductionp. 145
Structure of ATT Pilot Projectsp. 145
Regional and Urban Projectsp. 148
LLAMD Euro-Projectp. 148
QUARTET Projectp. 153
Corridor (Interurban) Projectsp. 155
CITRAp. 155
Melyssap. 156
Coordination and Expectationsp. 157
Select Bibliographyp. 158
Prometheusp. 159
Overviewp. 159
Introduction and Project Summaryp. 159
Road Transport in Europe--Situation and Projectionsp. 160
System Approachp. 162
PROMETHEUS Feasibility Studiesp. 164
System Architecture and Introductory Strategyp. 168
Acknowlegmentsp. 173
The Intelligent Vehicle--a Means of Safe Drivingp. 173
Introductionp. 173
Goals and Potential Pitfallsp. 174
Vision Enhancementp. 179
Proper Vehicle Operationp. 182
Collision Avoidancep. 189
Common Research Areasp. 191
Conclusionp. 195
Acknowledgmentsp. 196
Cooperative Driving Objectivesp. 196
Application Specificationsp. 197
Common European Demonstratorsp. 200
Future Developmentsp. 205
Communication Systemsp. 206
Introduction of Cooperative Driving Systems on the Marketp. 207
Dual-Mode Route Guidancep. 209
Introductionp. 209
Need for Route Guidancep. 209
Autonomous and Infrastructure-Based Route Guidance Systemsp. 211
Dual-Mode Route Guidance Systemsp. 215
Demonstrations of Feasibilityp. 217
Future Work and Implementationsp. 220
Conclusionsp. 220
Referencesp. 221
IVHS America: A Public-Private Partnershipp. 223
Introductionp. 223
Backgroundp. 223
IVHS Functional Areasp. 225
Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS)p. 226
Advanced Travel Information Systems (ATIS)p. 226
Advanced Vehicle Control Systems (AVCS)p. 226
Commercial Vehicle Operationsp. 227
Advanced Public Transportation Systemsp. 227
Current Statusp. 227
The Strategic Plan for IVHS in the United Statesp. 233
Goalsp. 233
Magnitude and Sources of Fundingp. 233
Challenges to IVHS Deploymentp. 234
Roles and Responsibilities of the Participantsp. 235
Course of Actionp. 238
IVHS Americap. 238
IVHS America Missionp. 239
IVHS America Organizationp. 239
Federal Advisory Committeep. 241
IVHS America Activitiesp. 242
Conclusionp. 244
Select Bibliographyp. 245
ADVANCE--The Illinois Dynamic Navigation and Route Guidance Demonstration Programp. 247
Introductionp. 247
Objectivesp. 248
System Designp. 249
Overview of Configurationp. 249
Mobile Navigation Assistantp. 252
RF Communications Networkp. 256
Traffic Information Centerp. 257
Traffic-Related Functionsp. 258
Design of the Demonstrationp. 261
Location of the Test Areap. 261
Probe Requirementsp. 263
Driver Recruitmentp. 263
Implementation and Evaluationp. 268
Acknowledgmentsp. 269
Referencesp. 269
The Michigan Initiativep. 271
Introductionp. 271
The University of Michigan IVHS Programp. 272
Overviewp. 272
Planning and Developmentp. 273
Educationp. 274
Basic Researchp. 274
Applied Researchp. 276
The MDOT IVHS Programp. 277
Metropolitan IVHS Programp. 277
Expansion of Detroit's Existing Advanced Traffic Management Systemp. 278
DIRECTp. 278
MTC to Roadsidep. 279
Roadside to Motoristsp. 279
Oakland County's FAST-TRACp. 281
MDOT/FTA Projectp. 282
Advantage I-75p. 283
International Border Crossing Studyp. 284
Metropolitan Detroit Incident Management Coordination Effortsp. 284
National Incident Management Conferencep. 284
Other Interestsp. 285
MDOT's Transportation Systems Operation Paradigmp. 285
Conclusionp. 286
Referencesp. 286
Overview of Japanese Development and Future Issuesp. 289
Introductionp. 289
Roadside Information and Traffic Measurement Systemsp. 290
Facilities in Urban Networksp. 291
Facilities in Expresswaysp. 292
Reaction of Drivers to Travel Time and Graphic Information Boardp. 293
In-Vehicle Information Systemsp. 295
Basic Configuration of Japanese Systemsp. 295
Classification of the Use of Mobile Communicationsp. 296
Some Aspects of Human-Machine Interfacep. 300
Questionnaire Surveys in CACSp. 300
Evaluation of Navigation Systemp. 301
General Framework for Analysis and Designp. 302
Future Issues of RandDp. 304
Route Guidance Systemp. 304
Current RandD Programsp. 307
Concluding Remarksp. 310
Need for Comprehensive Study on Human-Machine Interface Problemsp. 310
System Engineering Approach to Computer Network Design of Route Guidance Systemp. 310
International Collaboration and Standardizationp. 311
Social Acceptance of Information and IVHS in the U.S.p. 312
Referencesp. 313
RACS and VICSp. 315
RACS--Road-Automobile Communication Systems (RACS)p. 315
Prefacep. 315
Development of RACSp. 315
Outline of RACSp. 318
Future Outlookp. 325
Latest Movement of VICS--Vehicle Information and Communication Systemp. 326
Introductionp. 326
Objectives of the VICS Promotion Councilp. 327
Road Traffic Information in VICSp. 327
Outline of the Organization of the VICS Promotion Councilp. 327
Current Activities of the Steering, Commerce, and Research Committeesp. 328
Conclusionp. 330
Select Bibliographyp. 330
Onboard Equipmentp. 331
Dynamic Route Guidancep. 331
A Brief History of Navigation Systemsp. 334
Configuration of Onboard Equipmentp. 336
Map Matchingp. 336
Sensorsp. 338
Digital Mapp. 342
CDCRAFTp. 344
Communication Mediap. 345
Future Developmentp. 346
Referencesp. 348
Glossaryp. 351
About the Authorsp. 357
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780890066133
ISBN-10: 0890066132
Series: Mobile Communications Library
Audience: General
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 396
Published: 1st December 1994
Publisher: Artech House Publishers
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 22.9 x 15.2  x 2.5
Weight (kg): 0.75