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Academia's Golden Age : Universities in Massachusetts, 1945-1970 - Richard M. Freeland

Academia's Golden Age

Universities in Massachusetts, 1945-1970

Hardcover

Published: 23rd April 1992
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This book examines the evolution of American universities during the years following World War II. Emphasizing the importance of change at the campus level, the book combines a general consideration of national trends with a close study of eight diverse universities in Massachusetts. The eight are Harvard, M.I.T., Tufts, Brandeis, Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern and the University of Massachusetts. Broad analytic chapters examine major developments like expansion, the rise of graduate education and research, the professionalization of the faculty, and the decline of general education. These chapters also review criticisms of academia that arose in the late 1960s and the fate of various reform proposals during the 1970s. Additional chapters focus on the eight campuses to illustrate the forces that drove different kinds of institutions--research universities, college-centered universities, urban private universities and public universities--in responding to the circumstances of the postwar years.

"A magnificent work of scholarship....No book tells more about the dirty little secrets of universities as they jockey to enhance their prestige and resources. No book tells more about the universities and colleges of a single state. Academia's Golden Age is one of the very best books ever written about the history of American higher education."--Society "An elegantly written piece of social history that can take its place with pride next to the work of Arthur Schlesinger, Sr., Oscar Handlin, and Samuel Eliot Morison."--Boston Phoenix "With higher education under fire from so many quarters, a comprehensive history of the development of eight Massachusetts colleges and universities could not be more timely.... From presidential searches to battles over campus expansions, the book provides an exhaustive behind-the-scenes look at some of the nation's leading institutions....Essential reading."--Boston Globe "Provid[es] critical insights into an unexplored era in American higher education....This readable, scholarly text compares favorably with L.G. Heller's excellent The Death of the American University."--Choice "With scholarly authority and clarity of style, Richard Freeland has captured brilliantly those brief years during which America put its colleges and universities on a pedestal. He does so with a focus on metropolitan Boston, long considered the academic Athens of America, and he examines that claim in contemporary times. Skillfully treating the overall pattern of development in higher education and that of eight specific institutions, Freeland moves over a wide range from Harvard and M.I.T. to the University of Massachusetts. He examines the triumphs and trials of each. As a onetime faculty member and administrator in all three, I can testify to the quality of his historical analysis and to the gracefulness of his writing. For anyone who wants to understand higher education in the United States today, this book has to be read and pondered."--Robert Wood, Wesleyan University "A magnificent work of scholarship....No book tells more about the dirty little secrets of universities as they jockey to enhance their prestige and resources. No book tells more about the universities and colleges of a single state. Academia's Golden Age is one of the very best books ever written about the history of American higher education."--Society "An elegantly written piece of social history that can take its place with pride next to the work of Arthur Schlesinger, Sr., Oscar Handlin, and Samuel Eliot Morison."--Boston Phoenix "With higher education under fire from so many quarters, a comprehensive history of the development of eight Massachusetts colleges and universities could not be more timely.... From presidential searches to battles over campus expansions, the book provides an exhaustive behind-the-scenes look at some of the nation's leading institutions....Essential reading."--Boston Globe "Provid[es] critical insights into an unexplored era in American higher education....This readable, scholarly text compares favorably with L.G. Heller's excellent The Death of the American University."--Choice "With scholarly authority and clarity of style, Richard Freeland has captured brilliantly those brief years during which America put its colleges and universities on a pedestal. He does so with a focus on metropolitan Boston, long considered the academic Athens of America, and he examines that claim in contemporary times. Skillfully treating the overall pattern of development in higher education and that of eight specific institutions, Freeland moves over a wide range from Harvard and M.I.T. to the University of Massachusetts. He examines the triumphs and trials of each. As a onetime faculty member and administrator in all three, I can testify to the quality of his historical analysis and to the gracefulness of his writing. For anyone who wants to understand higher education in the United States today, this book has to be read and pondered."--Robert Wood, Wesleyan University "American higher education came of age in the years between 1945 and 1970. Until now there has been no history of this critical period. Richard Freeland's study of the evolution of higher education in Massachusetts during this time is a much needed book and an important scholarly work."--Arthur Levine, Harvard University "This splendid study of higher education in one state is also an excellent commentary on developments in all 50 states during higher education's most Golden Age--an Age that also had its impurities as is carefully noted. Thoroughly researched and marked by balanced good judgment."--Clark Kerr, University of California, Berkeley "[Freeland] accepted a difficult challenge, to understand and explain the "paradox within a paradox" that characterized higher education in the 1950s and 1960s....The author has met the challenge well, in scholarly fashion, in readable prose, and with commendable perceptiveness. As one who served as a university president during "Academia's Golden Age," I find engrossing his account of the period, impressive the thoroughness of his research, and remarkable the insights he acquired."--Nils Y. Wessell, President of Tufts University (1953-1966) "Freeland's account brilliantly illuminates the main lines of recent academic development."--History of Education Quarterly "Freeland has chronicled well an extraordinary period in the history of American higher education."--Journal of American History "One of the rare works exploring academia's recent history....One cannot help but find [Freeland's] study enlightening for its treatment of higher education history and policy."--Reviews in American History "Ambitious and intelligent....An important scholarly study....A wide readership of this book is deserved."--Historical Studies in Education "A fascinating study of universities in Massachusetts during the quarter-century following World War II."--American Historical Review

Introductionp. 3
Contexts
Academic Development and Social Change: Higher Education in Massachusetts before 1945p. 17
Prologue: Three Centuries of College Building, 1636-1929p. 18
Historical Dynamics of Academic Changep. 35
The Long Pause, 1929-1945: University Development in Depression and Warp. 51
The World Transformed: A Golden Age for American Universities, 1945-1970p. 70
Academic Ideas and Developmental Opportunities in the Postwar Yearsp. 70
The Three Revolutions: Enrollments, Finances, and Facultyp. 86
Disarray and Reassessment: A Second Debate on Academic Valuesp. 97
Institutions
Emergence of the Modern Research University: Harvard and M.I.T., 1945-1970p. 123
From Depression to Prosperity: The Early Postwar Yearsp. 123
Consolidating the New Focus: Research and Graduate Educationp. 139
The Economics of Academic Progressp. 148
Undergraduate Education in the Research Universityp. 154
Organizational Dimensions of Academic Changep. 161
The Old Order Changesp. 172
Evolution of the College-centered University: Tufts and Brandeis, 1945-1970p. 179
The Postwar Years at Tuftsp. 179
The Founding of Brandeisp. 185
Institutional Mobility in the Early Golden Agep. 192
The 1960s at Tuftsp. 201
The 1960s at Brandeisp. 207
Organization, Leadership, and Institutional Changep. 212
Dilemmas of the College-centered Universityp. 223
Transformation of the Urban University: Boston University, Boston College, and Northeastern, 1945-1972p. 234
Postwar Boom: Veterans, Growth, and Capital Accumulationp. 234
Shifting Emphasis in the 1950sp. 242
The "Bonanza Years" at Boston Collegep. 251
The "Blooming" at Northeasternp. 260
The 1960s at Boston Universityp. 268
Institutional Mobility and Organizational Formp. 274
The Irony of the Urban Universityp. 286
The Good Times Endp. 289
From State College to University System: The University of Massachusetts, 1945-1973p. 298
The Early Postwar Yearsp. 298
UMass in the 1950sp. 306
UMass in the 1960sp. 315
Academic Organization and Political Systemsp. 333
From Rapid Growth to Steady Statep. 346
Patterns
The Institutional Complex and Academic Adaptation, 1945-1980p. 355
The Institutional Complex in Action: 1945-1970p. 355
Adaptations of the 1970sp. 379
The Institutional Complex and the Reform Agendap. 401
Abbreviationsp. 421
Notesp. 424
Bibliographyp. 484
Indexp. 512
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780195054644
ISBN-10: 0195054644
Audience: Professional
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 544
Published: 23rd April 1992
Country of Publication: US
Dimensions (cm): 24.51 x 16.38  x 4.5
Weight (kg): 0.95