1300 187 187
 
Windblown World : The Journals of Jack Kerouac, 1947-1954 - Douglas Brinkley

Windblown World

The Journals of Jack Kerouac, 1947-1954

Paperback

Published: 4th April 2006
For Ages: 18+ years old
Ships: 10 to 14 business days
10 to 14 business days
RRP $36.00
$21.95
39%
OFF

This is a selection of Kerouac's journals that provide further insight into the man behind the words. Jack Kerouac is best-known through the image he put forth in his autobiographical novels. Yet it is only his private journals, in which he set down the raw material of his life and thinking, that reveal to readers the real Kerouac. In "Windblown World", distinguished academic Douglas Brinkley has gathered a selection of journal entries from the most pivotal period in Kerouac's life - 1947 to 1954. Here is Kerouac as a hungry young writer finishing his first novel while forging crucial relationships with Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Neal Cassady. Truly a self-portrait of the artist as a young man, this unique and indispensable volume is sure to become an integral element of the Beat oeuvre.

"A must-have for anyone who has an interest in Kerouac and the Beats" - Johnny Depp "A poignant selection." - Time "Should help rescue Kerouac from the cultists and secure his admission to the mainstream Hall of Fame." - New York Times Book Review"

ISBN: 9780143036067
ISBN-10: 0143036068
Audience: General
For Ages: 18+ years old
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 432
Published: 4th April 2006
Dimensions (cm): 20.2 x 13.6  x 2.6
Weight (kg): 20.4

Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, where, he said, he 'roamed fields and riverbanks by day and night, wrote little novels in my room, first novel written at age eleven, also kept extensive diaries and "newspapers" covering my own-invented horse-racing and baseball and football worlds' (as recorded in the novel Doctor Sax). He was educated by Jesuit brothers in Lowell. He said that he 'decided to become a writer at age seventeen under influence of Sebastian Sampas, local young poet, who later died on Anzio beach head; read the life of Jack London at eighteen and decided to also be a lonesome traveler; early literary influences Saroyan and Hemingway; later Wolfe (after I had broken leg in Freshman football at Columbia read Tom Wolfe and roamed his New York on crutches).'

Kerouac wished, however, to develop his own new prose style, which he called 'spontaneous prose.' He used this technique to record the life of the American 'traveler' and the experiences of the Beat generation of the 1950s. This may clearly be seen in his most famous novel On the Road, and also in The Subterraneans and The Dharma Bums. His first more orthodox published novel was The Town and the City. Jack Kerouac, who described himself as a 'strange solitary crazy Catholic mystic,' was working on his longest novel, a surrealistic study of the last ten years of his life when he died in 1969, aged forty-seven.

Other works by Jack Kerouac include Big Sur, Desolation Angels, Lonesome Traveler, Visions of Gerard, Tristessa, and a book of poetry called Mexico City Blues. On the Road: The Original Scroll, the full uncensored transcription of the original manuscript of On the Road, is published by Penguin Modern Classics.

Visit Jack Kerouac's Booktopia Author Page