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Under the Dome - Stephen King

Paperback

Published: 6th July 2010
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RRP $39.99
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A New York Times Bestseller

On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chesters Mill, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash, a gardeners hand is severed, and people are divided from their families as the dome comes down. Dale Barbara; an Iraq vet working as a short-order cook, finds himself teamed with a few intrepid citizens against Big Jim Rennie, a politician grasping for the reins of power.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Under the Dome
 
3.7

(based on 3 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

67%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

    Cons

      Best Uses

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          • Everyday reader (3)

        Reviewed by 3 customers

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        1.0

        Did not enjoy this book at all

        By I like good books

        from In my living room

        About Me Everyday Reader

        Pros

          Cons

          • Disappointing
          • Graticious Violence
          • Not the Author's Best

          Best Uses

            Comments about Under the Dome:

            This book, which has around 1,000 pages, takes about 150 pages until it actually starts. Stephen King has always liked to show humans at their lowest, but in this book, he pushed that to a limit where I just felt violated by him. I've read many of this books, and I truly hate this one. He dwells on violence against women over and over in ways that make me think he's got no other ideas anymore. His violence and horror used to be equal opportunity, in this book, it's the women and children that get mutilated. If that's your thing - go for it.

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            5.0

            Brillian - King at his best!

            By Max

            from Melbourne

            About Me Everyday Reader

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Engaging Characters
            • Page Turner
            • Suspenseful
            • Well Written

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Stephen King fans

              Comments about Under the Dome:

              Icluded in the front of the book is a picture of the town and reference to characters. As there are so many characters in this book, it's a great reference that allows you to keep track of all the story lines going on.

              Comment on this review

               
              5.0

              Excellent reading

              By Jillbo

              from Melbourne, AU

              About Me Everyday Reader

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Deserves Multiple Readings
              • Engaging Characters
              • Page Turner
              • Suspenseful
              • Well Written

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Older Readers

                Comments about Under the Dome:

                Typical Stepen King.
                Suspenseful. gripping

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                "A wildly entertaining trip." -- "People" (3.5 stars)

                1

                From two thousand feet, where Claudette Sanders was taking a flying lesson, the town of Chester’s Mill gleamed in the morning light like something freshly made and just set down. Cars trundled along Main Street, flashing up winks of sun. The steeple of the Congo Church looked sharp enough to pierce the unblemished sky. The sun raced along the surface of Prestile Stream as the Seneca V overflew it, both plane and water cutting the town on the same diagonal course.

                “Chuck, I think I see two boys beside the Peace Bridge! Fishing!” Her very delight made her laugh. The flying lessons were courtesy of her husband, who was the town’s First Selectman. Although of the opinion that if God had wanted man to fly, He would have given him wings, Andy was an extremely coaxable man, and eventually Claudette had gotten her way. She had enjoyed the experience from the first. But this wasn’t mere enjoyment; it was exhilaration. Today was the first time she had really understood what made flying great. What made it cool.

                Chuck Thompson, her instructor, touched the control yoke gently, then pointed at the instrument panel. “I’m sure,” he said, “but let’s keep the shiny side up, Claudie, okay?”

                “Sorry, sorry.”

                “Not at all.” He had been teaching people to do this for years, and he liked students like Claudie, the ones who were eager to learn something new. She might cost Andy Sanders some real money before long; she loved the Seneca, and had expressed a desire to have one just like it, only new. That would run somewhere in the neighborhood of a million dollars. Although not exactly spoiled, Claudie Sanders had undeniably expensive tastes which, lucky man, Andy seemed to have no trouble satisfying.

                Chuck also liked days like this: unlimited visibility, no wind, perfect teaching conditions. Nevertheless, the Seneca rocked slightly as she over-corrected.

                “You’re losing your happy thoughts. Don’t do that. Come to one-twenty. Let’s go out Route 119. And drop on down to nine hundred.”

                She did, the Seneca’s trim once more perfect. Chuck relaxed.

                They passed above Jim Rennie’s Used Cars, and then the town was behind them. There were fields on either side of 119, and trees burning with color. The Seneca’s cruciform shadow fled up the blacktop, one dark wing briefly brushing over an ant-man with a pack on his back. The ant-man looked up and waved. Chuck waved back, although he knew the guy couldn’t see him.

                “Beautiful goddam day!” Claudie exclaimed. Chuck laughed.

                Their lives had another forty seconds to run.

                2

                The woodchuck came bumbling along the shoulder of Route 119, headed in the direction of Chester’s Mill, although the town was still a mile and a half away and even Jim Rennie’s Used Cars was only a series of twinkling sunflashes arranged in rows at the place where the highway curved to the left. The chuck planned (so far as a woodchuck can be said to plan anything) to head back into the woods long before he got that far. But for now, the shoulder was fine. He’d come farther from his burrow than he meant to, but the sun had been warm on his back and the smells were crisp in his nose, forming rudimentary images—not quite pictures—in his brain.

                He stopped and rose on his back paws for an instant. His eyes weren’t as good as they used to be, but good enough to make out a human up there, walking in his direction on the other shoulder.

                The chuck decided he’d go a little farther anyway. Humans sometimes left behind good things to eat.

                He was an old fellow, and a fat fellow. He had raided many garbage cans in his time, and knew the way to the Chester’s Mill landfill as well as he knew the three tunnels of his own burrow; always good things to eat at the landfill. He waddled a complacent old fellow’s waddle, watching the human walking on the other side of the road.

                The man stopped. The chuck realized he had been spotted. To his right and just ahead was a fallen birch. He would hide under there, wait for the man to go by, then investigate for any tasty—

                The chuck got that far in his thoughts—and another three waddling steps—although he had been cut in two. Then he fell apart on the edge of the road. Blood squirted and pumped; guts tumbled into the dirt; his rear legs kicked rapidly twice, then stopped.

                His last thought before the darkness that comes to us all, chucks and humans alike: What happened?

                3

                All the needles on the control panel dropped dead.

                “What the hell?” Claudie Sanders said. She turned to Chuck. Her eyes were wide, but there was no panic in them, only bewilderment. There was no time for panic.

                Chuck never saw the control panel. He saw the Seneca’s nose crumple toward him. Then he saw both propellers disintegrate.

                There was no time to see more. No time for anything. The Seneca exploded over Route 119 and rained fire on the countryside. It also rained body parts. A smoking forearm—Claudette’s—landed with a thump beside the neatly divided woodchuck.

                It was October twenty-first.

                ISBN: 9781439149034
                ISBN-10: 1439149038
                Audience: General
                Format: Paperback
                Language: English
                Number Of Pages: 1088
                Published: 6th July 2010
                Dimensions (cm): 22.35 x 14.99  x 5.84
                Weight (kg): 1.38

                Stephen King

                Stephen King was born in Portland, Maine in 1947, the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King. He made his first professional short story sale in 1967 to Startling Mystery Stories. In the fall of 1973, he began teaching high school English classes at Hampden Academy, the public high school in Hampden, Maine. Writing in the evenings and on the weekends, he continued to produce short stories and to work on novels. In the spring of 1973, Doubleday & Co., accepted the novel Carrie for publication, providing him the means to leave teaching and write full-time. He has since published over 50 books and has become one of the world's most successful writers.

                Stephen lives in Maine and Florida with his wife, novelist Tabitha King. They are regular contributors to a number of charities including many libraries and have been honored locally for their philanthropic activities.

                Visit Stephen King's Booktopia Author Page