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Timequake : Vintage Classics - Kurt Vonnegut

Timequake

Vintage Classics

Paperback

Published: August 1998
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According to Vonnegut`s alter ego, science-fiction writer Kilgore Trout a global timequake will occur in New York City on 13 February 2001. It is the moment when the universe suffers a crisis of conscience. Should it expand or make a great big bang? It decides to back up a decade to 1991, making everyone in the world endure ten years of deja vu and a total loss of free will-not to mention reliving every nanosecond of one of the tawdiest and most hollow decades.

In 1996, dead centre of the `re-run' Vonnegut is wrestling again with Time-quake 1, a book he couldn`t write the first time and won`t be able to now. As he struggles, he addresses, with his trademark wicked wit, the relationship between memory and deja vu, humanism, suicide, the Great Depression and World War 11 as the last generated character builders, the loss of American eloquence, the obsolescent thrill of reading books, and what `extended family' really means.

About the Author

Kurt Vonnegut was born in Indianapolis in 1922 and studied biochemistry at Cornell University. During WWII, as a prisoner of war in Germany, he witnessed the destruction of Dresden by Allied bombers, an experience which inspired his novel SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE.

Vonnegut's first "novel" in seven years (and 14th overall) might by an extremely generous extension of the term be labeled an unassuming metafiction. Actually, it's unequal parts commonplace book, fragmentary autobiography, dystopian romance, and bemused meditation on our planet's presumable determination to destroy itself. The premise goes as follows: In the year 2001, "a sudden glitch in the space-time continuum, made everybody and everything do exactly what they'd been doing during the past decade . . . a second time": i.e., 2001 reverted to 1991, and "free will kicked in again" only after said decade had torturously re-run itself. One yearns to know what Thomas Berger might have made of this idea. Vonnegut, essentially, settles for employing it as an excuse to rummage through his own past and that of his alter-ego, the fictional science fiction writer Kilgore Trout. Accordingly, the novel about this "timequake" becomes a free-form farrago in which the author tenderly salutes and mourns his living and dead siblings, wives, and children; pays tribute to favorite books and writers; retells old jokes; reminisces about his experiences in WW II, and about his experiences also as a later respected public figure (visiting Nigeria after the Biafran War; giving a speech on the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima); and woolgathers - often cloyingly - about the fate of "humanism" in an age dominated by technology. The book severely tests a reader's patience when it's padded with random bits of semi-relevant information and needless explanations (the plot of The Scarlet Letter; the full text of the 23rd Psalm). And yet, Vonnegut's fitful summaries of the life and writings of the Hunter Thompson-like Kilgore Trout are often very funny (the story "The Sisters B-36," set on "the matriarchal planet Booboo," really ought to have been written). So, as he himself might say, it goes. "We are here on earth to fart around" runs one of Vonnegut's more endearing pronouncements. Nobody does it better. (Kirkus Reviews)

ISBN: 9780099267546
ISBN-10: 0099267543
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 240
Published: August 1998
Dimensions (cm): 19.8 x 13.1  x 1.6
Weight (kg): 0.18