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The Twelfth Raven : A memoir of stroke, love and recovery - Doris Brett

The Twelfth Raven

A memoir of stroke, love and recovery

Paperback

Published: 3rd March 2014
In Stock. Ships in 1-2 business days from Australia
RRP $29.99
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Published: 1st March 2014
Format: PDF
$14.40

When Doris Brett's fit, healthy 59-year-old husband Martin had a stroke, they were unexpectedly thrown into a journey of discovery. What began as a minor stroke turned into a golf-ball sized blood clot on his brain, followed by a life-threatening heart condition.

Later Brett learned that she carried the potentially deadly BRCA1 genetic mutation. However - due largely to Doris' research into brain plasticity and the neurotherapy techniques she implemented - Martin's recovery was exceptional and he has now returned to all of his pre-stroke activities.

The Twelfth Raven is a literary journey through a series of crises, and an inspirational story of recovery after stroke. Doris Brett's brave and unflinching memoir offers hope to the hundreds of thousands of people affected by stroke, through the active intervention Doris conducted and the excellent results that were achieved.

Read Caroline Baum's Review

Stroke is our top killer. We need to know more about it. Doris Brett is the perfect navigator into this strange country. Her calm, candid and considered prose documents what happened when her husband had a stroke which saw him lose most of his basic functions. Their journey together into the world of neuroplasticity and recovery is full of insights into the science of the brain and the emotional impact of being a ceaselessly committed carer. Brett's own personal medical setbacks add to her challenges, but she faces everything with dignity and stoicism.

About the Author

Doris Brett resides in Melbourne with her husband and daughter. She is a clinical psychologist as well as a multi-award winning author and poet. She has been published in America, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Poland and Russia. She has been awarded numerous literary awards for her poetry, including the Queensland Premier's Poetry Award. In The Constellation of the Crab a collection of poems that arose out of her experience with ovarian cancer was short-listed for the National Book Council Poetry Prize.

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5.0

(based on 3 reviews)

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    (3)

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Pros

  • Informative (3)
  • Well written (3)

Cons

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Reviewed by 3 customers

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5.0

Very Good portrayal of Australia's Health System

By 

from Brisbane, Australia

About Me Bookworm

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Informative
  • Well Written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Gift
    • Reference

    If you have had family going through the experience of having a Stroke this is a great book to help lead you through and prepare for occasions that have not yet arisen. I read it a few years ago and it was the perfect gift for a relative with a spouse undergoing the trauma that is Stroke. Also gives you hope that things may slowly but surely get better over time.

     
    5.0

    Gripping reading and very practical

    By 

    from Melbourne AU

    About Me Bookworm

    Pros

    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Easy To Read
    • Engaging characters
    • Informative
    • Page-Turner
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Gift
      • Older Readers
      • Reference

      A brilliant book - a real page turner and also incredibly informative and full of practical tips for those who have been touched by stroke.

       
      5.0

      A story of courage and triumph

      By 

      from Melbourne, AU

      About Me Everyday Reader

      Pros

      • Informative
      • Page-Turner
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Gift
        • Older Readers

        This book grabbed me from the start. Ms. Brett and husband Martin are having a pleasant evening out when suddenly Martin complains that he's having trouble "finding words". A stroke is happening, at first it seems to be a "small one", but Martin's condition rapidly deteriorates.

        Brett describes the events and her responses with clarity and insight. What happens over the coming weeks and months is a fascinating story of struggle, setbacks and courage. It's also a story about patient advocacy. She takes you through it all, painting a vivid picture of what it's like to have your world turned upside down in an instant. It's thoroughly engrossing, a very "human" story, with moments of despair, but also humour. During sleepless nights she uses late-night emails to ease her growing feelings of isolation - and when her computer locks up her reaction is intense, and told in a witty manner that left me laughing and nodding in recognition. Likewise the hospital elevators which malfunction in hilarious if aggravating ways. At one point she turns aside as narrator and directly warns the reader "Don't take elevator 11," leaving me in a fit of giggles.

        More than just a good story told well, this book left me with a renewed understanding that as patients and family of patients, its very important to be involved. We can't sit back and assume that the medical team working for us will handle it all for us. We have to stay involved, alert, asking questions.

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        ISBN: 9781742585635
        ISBN-10: 1742585639
        Audience: General
        Format: Paperback
        Language: English
        Number Of Pages: 336
        Published: 3rd March 2014
        Publisher: UNIV OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
        Country of Publication: AU
        Dimensions (cm): 23.4 x 15.3  x 1.83
        Weight (kg): 0.5