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The Silmarillion - J. R. R. Tolkien

Paperback

Published: November 1991
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RRP $16.99
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Set in a time far earlier than Tolkien's master works, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, this is the epic history of the elves, and the grand story of the creation of Tolkien's magical world. The Lord of the Rings narrated the great events at the end of the Third Age; but the tales of The Silmarillion are legends deriving from a much deeper past, when Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in Middle-earth, and the High Elves made war upon him for the recovery of the Silmarils. Never published in the author's lifetime, The Silmarillion is an essential compendium for all Tolkien fans. It will be published in five consecutive volumes, each completely unabridged. The series contains not only the Quenta Silmarillion, but four other short works: the Ainulindale, Valaquenta, Akallabeth and Of the Rings of Power.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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The Silmarillion
 
4.3

(based on 3 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Compelling characters (3)
  • Original story (3)
  • Takes you to another world (3)

Cons

  • Difficult to follow (3)

Best Uses

  • Older readers (3)

Reviewed by 3 customers

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4.0

It takes dedication to read

By Lia

from Sydney, AU

About Me Bookworm

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Compelling Characters
  • Original Story
  • Takes You To Another World

Cons

  • Difficult To Follow

Best Uses

  • Older Readers

Comments about The Silmarillion:

I'm actually still in the process in reading this but I've enjoyed it immensely so far. The pros outweigh the cons for this book.

The characters really draw you in and make you want to know more about them. The plot succeeds in answering your long-held questions that you may of had regarding other books by Tolkien (Lord of the Rings.) It also cements the layers of this fabled world with its rich history making it seem all too real and tangible.

Cons: It's a bit confusing to follow and I get a bit lost sometimes. Other times, I have to go back and read some previous parts to regain understanding.

My main message: You have to be seriously dedicated to read this and truly enjoy Tolkien's work because this book is not for the faint of heart. In my case, I think the book is great and I don't regret buying it. I'm just going to suck it up and finish reading.

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4.0

And He begat

By angrierre

from Qld

About Me Everyday Reader

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Compelling Characters
  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Great For Any Age
  • Original Story
  • Takes You To Another World
  • Well Written

Cons

  • Difficult To Follow

Best Uses

  • Older Readers
  • Younger Readers

Comments about The Silmarillion:

It reads like genesis if the bible and gives the history of the world the hobbit live in. A great story but one you have to follow closely.

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Mindblown ....

By Elf from Downunder

from Corowa NSW

About Me Bookworm

Pros

  • Compelling Characters
  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Great For Any Age
  • Original Story
  • Takes You To Another World
  • Well Written

Cons

  • Difficult To Follow

Best Uses

  • Gift
  • Older Readers
  • Travel Reading
  • Younger Readers

Comments about The Silmarillion:

Oh man. The way Tolkien wrote this book is hauntingly beautiful. I think I first read it way too young, and found the plot hard to follow, and the tragedy in it just broke me.
After reading now that I'm older, I'm completely mindblown! I can't describe this book with mere words. The characters are purely amazing with so much life and personalities that either leave you in awe or frightened. Although the various foreign names and places are hard to keep count of and quite hard to pronounce, I still really enjoyed it. I just wish it wasn't so tragic, and the elves ... are so different than in Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. I guess after so much loss and slaughter, they kind of just wanted to live as peacfully as they could.
But seriously ... I love it. Some of the characters will be with me forever while others will pass out of memory.

But I would recemmend reading Lord of the Rings first, or this book won't mean a lot to you. The elves truly have a dark and violent past, I can tell you.

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The total volume of Tolkien's Middle-Earth manuscripts is vastly greater than that of the completed Lord of the Rings, but it seems to be a near-hopeless tangle of variants and unfinished reworkings in both prose and verse. From the great body of material dealing with the "First Age" of Middle-Earth, Tolkien's son Christopher has compiled a prose narrative of the events surrounding the making and eventual loss of the three jewels called the Silmarils, many centuries before the Wars of the Ring. The protagonists are chiefly Elves. They appear here not as the steadfast, transcendent figures of the Ring books, but in their youth as a fiery and much-divided race capable of uglier passions than any of the "good" characters in the trilogy. The telling is uniformly solemn and distanced, compressing a great range of events into a schematic summation that is a far cry from the varied, immediate narrative of the Ring story. Taking a negative view, one might say that this is not a book or even a fragment of one; it is a grandiose outline showing the Tolkien style at its most determinedly pseudo-biblical. But the alternative view is more to the point: even these truncated materials shed an astonishing amount of "historical" light on The Lord of the Rings. The Silmarillion proper is the largest single chunk of "history," but it is accompanied by four shorter chronicles which first establish the foundations of Middle-Earth (an explicit Creation-myth) and then convey the great sweep of history from the Silmaril wars to the Wars of the Ring. Turning back to the trilogy from this new prologue, one finds the intrinsic grandeur of Tolkien's design re-illuminated at every stage. It is now sadly clear that we shall have no more Middle-Earth books - that is, books in their own right. But thanks to the efforts of Christopher Tolkien, we may be privileged in coming years to follow a progressive and dazzling enrichment of the book we all thought we knew. (Kirkus Reviews)

J.R.R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born on the 3rd January, 1892 at Bloemfontein in the Orange Free State, but at the age of four he and his brother were taken back to England by their mother. After his father's death the family moved to Sarehole, on the south-eastern edge of Birmingham. Tolkien spent a happy childhood in the countryside and his sensibility to the rural landscape can clearly be seen in his writing and his pictures.

His mother died when he was only twelve and both he and his brother were made wards of the local priest and sent to King Edward's School, Birmingham, where Tolkien shone in his classical work. After completing a First in English Language and Literature at Oxford, Tolkien married Edith Bratt. He was also commissioned in the Lancashire Fusiliers and fought in the battle of the Somme. After the war, he obtained a post on the New English Dictionary and began to write the mythological and legendary cycle which he originally called The Book of Lost Tales but which eventually became known as The Silmarillion.

In 1920 Tolkien was appointed Reader in English Language at the University of Leeds which was the beginning of a distinguished academic career culminating with his election as Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. Meanwhile Tolkien wrote for his children and told them the story of The Hobbit. It was his publisher, Stanley Unwin, who asked for a sequel to The Hobbit and gradually Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, a huge story that took twelve years to complete and which was not published until Tolkien was approaching retirement. After retirement Tolkien and his wife lived near Oxford, but then moved to Bournemouth. Tolkien returned to Oxford after his wife's death in 1971. He died on 2 September 1973 leaving The Silmarillion to be edited for publication by his son, Christopher.

Visit J.R.R. Tolkien's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780261102736
ISBN-10: 0261102737
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 480
Published: November 1991
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Dimensions (cm): 17.8 x 11.1  x 3.0
Weight (kg): 0.25