1300 187 187
 
The Mammoth Hunters : Earth's Children Series : Book 3 - Jean M. Auel

The Mammoth Hunters

Earth's Children Series : Book 3

Paperback

Published: 1st November 1986
Ships: 10 to 15 business days
10 to 15 business days
RRP $17.99
$11.90
34%
OFF

Once again Jean M. Auel opens the door of a time long past to reveal an age of wonder and danger at the dawn of the modern human race.

Riding Whinney with Jondalar, the man she loves, and followed by the mare’s colt, Ayla ventures into the land of the Mamutoi — the Mammoth Hunters. She has finally found the Others she has been seeking. Though Ayla must learn their different customs and language, she is adopted because of her remarkable hunting ability, singular healing skills, and uncanny fire-making technique. She finds women friends and painful memories of the Clan she left behind, and meets Ranec, the dark-skinned, magnetic master carver of ivory, whom she cannot refuse — inciting Jondalar to a fierce jealousy that he tries to control by avoiding her.

Throughout the icy winter the tension mounts, but warming weather will bring the great mammoth hunt and the mating rituals of the Summer Meeting, when Ayla must choose to remain with Ranec and the Mamutoi, or to follow Jondalar on a long journey into an unknown future.

Third in the acclaimed Earth’s Children® series

About the Author

Born in Chicago in 1936, Jean Marie Untinen married Ray Bernard Auel after high school, raised five children, and attended college at night while working for an electronics firm in Portland, Oregon. Shortly after earning her MBA in 1976, she was inspired by a story idea so powerful it effectively consumed her for the next few years. In a single creative burst, she conceived a sweeping epic set in prehistoric Europe and featuring a unique heroine: a young Cro-Magnon woman named Ayla, raised as a misfit in a society of inhospitable Neandertals. Auel quit her job, immersed herself in research, and began writing nearly nonstop.

At first, Auel imagined she had the makings of a single book. But when she completed her first draft (more than 450,000 words!), she realized that the story fell naturally into six parts, each one demanding a novel all its own. She worked feverishly on the first installment, revising parts of it as many as 20 and 30 times. Published in 1980, The Clan of the Cave Bear became an instant bestseller, marking the start of the thrilling, totally original Ice Age saga, Earth's Children.

The series owes much of its appeal to Auel's feminist protagonist Ayla, a preternaturally resourceful woman with all the skills and abilities of men but without their warlike qualities. She is the first to ride a horse, tame a wolf, and make fire from flint; she understands the healing power of herbs; and, as the novels progress, she develops mystical, even shamanic powers. Readers were understandably intrigued.

Although Auel writes speculative fiction, she receives high marks for historical accuracy. In the interest of creating an authentic Ice Age setting, her research has led her in interesting, unpredictable directions. She has read extensively, traveled to archeological sites around the world, and learned through various sources how to knapp flint, tan hides, construct snow caves, and prepare medicinal herbs. What emerges in her writing is a precise evocation of time and place that provides a realistic and enthralling backdrop to Ayla's adventures.

"Lively and interesting." --"The Washington Post Book World ""Genuinely exciting."--"The Detroit News"

Jean Marie Auel

I was born on February 18, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois, the second of five children. My grandparents were Finnish immigrants and my parents were born on dairy farms in Northern Michigan, about 150 miles apart, and met in Chicago when they moved to the big city to find work. I grew up in Chicago, although the family used to drive to Michigan in the summer and spend time on both of my grandparents’ farms, so I knew that milk didn’t just come from a grocery store. My parents were intelligent, but they were working people. Advanced education was never stressed. My mother’s goal for me was the same as that of most mothers of teen-age daughters in the 1950’s: get married and have children. In truth, it disturbed her when I turned out to be bookworm who was always reading, and then learned typing and shorthand so I could have a career as a secretary. That was a bit too independent for the 50’s.

But, in 1954, shortly after graduation from high school, I married Ray Auel; he was 19, and in the Air Force. It was the Korean War then and Ray was training to maintain airplanes, particularly the hydraulic mechanism of the in-flight refueling system. Fortunately, by the time they were ready to send him overseas, the war was over. He was discharged in 1956. His father lived in Oregon, and we wanted to start our new life in a new place, so with one child and expecting a second, we moved to Oregon. Ray went to college on the GI Bill—funds made available to veterans by the Government for education that was interrupted to serve in the military—and worked full-time to support a growing family. I worked at temporary and part-time clerical jobs to help out, and had more children: five before my 25th birthday. I now have 15 grand children and eight great grandchildren.

Neither my husband nor I had an undergraduate degree, though we had both taken college courses. We got the necessary letters and met with the dean, only after we took the test and passed it with the higher score. We were both accepted. Four years later, in May 1976, we both received MBA’s from U of Portland. I was 40 years old, and by then, after going through a management training program at the company, I was a credit manager.

So how did I go from a reasonably successful career in business to writing novels set in the Ice Age? It began with discontent. Circuit board design had been fun, it was puzzle-solving for pay, but though the company had paid for my business education, the MBA, I discovered there was no place for me to grow. I kept running into a brick wall when I wanted to move up— nowadays it’s called a “glass ceiling.” In November 1976, a few months after getting my MBA, after 12 years with the electronics company, I quit. I planned to look for some other wonderful, exciting job in business.

I spun wheels applying for jobs, trying to decide what I wanted to do. Then, one day in late January 1977 I got an idea for a story about a young woman, who was living with people who were different, not just superficially–color of hair, or eyes, or skin–but substantially different. Of course, they thought she was different and viewed her with suspicion, but they allowed her to stay because she was taking care of an old man with a crippled arm.

I don’t know where that thought came from, I can’t tell you any more than any other writer can where ideas come from. Most writers don’t know, though if pressed, they may think of something in hindsight to satisfy questions. I’d been writing poetry for about ten years, but not fiction. But I began to wonder, could I write a short story like that? That’s how it began. I wonder if I can write a short story?

To read Jean’s revealing answers to the Booktopia Book Guru’s TEN TERRIFYING QUESTIONS…and to leave a comment - CLICK HERE

Visit Jean Marie Auel's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780553280944
ISBN-10: 0553280945
Series: Earth's Children
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 784
Published: 1st November 1986
Dimensions (cm): 17.8 x 11.4  x 3.2
Weight (kg): 0.35