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The Intervention : An anthology - Rosie Scott

The Intervention : An anthology

By: Rosie Scott (Editor), Anita Heiss (Editor)

Paperback

Published: 1st July 2015
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We are unable to discount The Intervention as it is a collaborative effort by a group of passionate writers, thinkers and activists who have donated their time and skills to produce this book. It has been priced to cover the costs of printing and distribution only.

Product Description

In this historic anthology, award-winning writers Rosie Scott and Dr Anita Heiss have gathered together the work of twenty of Australian’s finest writers both Indigenous and non-Indigenous together with powerful statements from Northern Territory Elders to bring a new dimension and urgency to an issue that has remained largely outside the public radar.

One of the most invasive, puzzling and unprecedented actions by a government in Australian history – the 2007 NT Intervention by the Howard Government- has resulted in an ongoing and flagrant breach of human rights. The introduction of this racist legislation has never been fully debated nationally nor has there ever been any significant consultation with the Indigenous communities most affected.

In compelling fiction, memoir, essays, poetry and communiqués, the dramatic story of the Intervention and the despair, anguish and anger of the First Nations people of the Territory comes alive.

The Intervention: an Anthology is an extraordinary document – deeply moving, impassioned, spiritual, angry and authoritative –it’s essential reading for anyone who wants to understand this passionate opposition.

As Anna Funder writes -‘An indispensable contribution to the debate’

From the editors: We are grateful to the Cultural Fund of CAL for their grant -The Cultural Fund supports a wide variety of projects which aim to encourage, and provide practical assistance to Copyright Agency's members and the Australian cultural community.

List of contributors

Debra Adelaide, Pat Anderson, Larissa Behrendt, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Eva Cox, Brenda L. Croft, Lionel Fogarty, Djiniyini Gondarra, Yingiya Mark Guyula, Rodney Hall, Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, Deni Langman, Melissa Lucashenko, Jeff McMullen, PM Newton, Christine Olsen, Bruce Pascoe, Nicole Watson, Samuel Wagan Watson, Rachel Willika, Alexis Wright, Yalmay Yunipingu and Arnold Zable.

About the Editors

Dr Rosie Scott is an internationally published award-winning writer who has published six novels which were finalists in most major Australian awards, a collection each of short stories, poems and essays and edited two anthologies. Her award winning play was the basis for a film which received several international prizes.

She is a permanent member of the Council of Australian Society of Authors, received the Sydney PEN Award, was awarded an honorary membership of PEN and she and Tom Keneally were nominated for the Human Rights Medal.

Recently she was nominated for the education section of 100 most influential people in Sydney for her work in mentoring and teaching about asylum seekers. She was co-founder of Women for Wik.

Her last book Faith Singer was on the list of 50 Essential Reads by Contemporary Writers compiled by the Orange committee, the Guardian and Hays Literary Festival

Her latest book is A Country Too Far, the anthology on asylum seekers co-edited with Tom Keneally.

Dr. Anita Heiss is the author of nonfiction, historical fiction, commercial women's fiction, poetry, social commentary, and travel articles. She is a regular guest at writers' festivals and travels internationally performing her work and lecturing on Indigenous literature. She is an Indigenous Literacy Day Ambassador and a proud member of the Wiradjuri nation of central NSW.

Anita is a board member of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy, a Patron of the Alliance of Girls' Schools of Australia and an Advocate for the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence. She is an Adjunct Professor with Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning, UTS and currently divides her time between writing, public speaking, emceeing, and as a workshop facilitator. Anita was a finalist in the 2013 Australian of the Year Awards and in the 2012 Human Rights Awards.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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4.0

(based on 5 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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    (0)

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    (1)

80%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Deserves multiple readings (4)
  • Easy to read (3)
  • Informative (3)
  • Well written (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Reference (3)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Everyday reader (3)

Reviewed by 5 customers

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(0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

on the gound but forgotten

By 

from Cairns

About Me Everyday Reader

Pros

  • Academic Wind

Cons

  • Disappointing

Best Uses

    I read books to find out how in touch with reality (this one) they are.

    Comment on this reviewHelp Icon

     
    5.0

    Must read book for all Australians

    By 

    from Sydney, AU

    About Me Everyday Reader

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • A Real Alternative Trut
    • A Real Alternative Truth
    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Easy To Read
    • Informative
    • Page-Turner
    • Well Written

    Cons

    • None

    Best Uses

    • Gift
    • Indigenous Policy Makers
    • Tertiary Education
    • Truth Seeking People

    I use this to learn an alternative a real truth about Aboriginal Australia
    To understand misconceptions many hold about Australia's Indigenous policies thanks to mainstream press & politicians of the day
    Honest recounts, range of narrative styles, provide a rich document that is confronting & personal, but also informative and supported by research.
    I plan to read again, but as I have, I have shared with students studying Indigenous Cultures and peoples as a way to add more Indigenous voices to The narrative of Australia.

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    5.0

    A necessary read for all people, especially Australians.

    By 

    from Newcastle, Australia

    About Me Bookworm

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Informative
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Educational
      • Reference
      • Younger Readers

      This book should be in every school and in every library. The Intervention, An Anthology, should be used in conjunction with other related materials, to form an integral part of the school curriculum. Schools should have an obligation teach our young people about the ongoing suffering and injustices still being inflicted upon our original people's in this country. Only with truth can we hope to produce adults that will have the knowledge and courage to change the world. Only through books like this, can we hope to give our young people those very necessary tools.

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      5.0

      The Intervention: An anthology: A must read for everyone!

      By 

      from Canberra

      About Me Everyday Reader

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Deserves Multiple Readings
      • Easy To Read
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Informative
        • Reference

        This book is a great reference for alternative views about the NT Emergency Response that the Howard Government mounted in its dying days in 2007. A 'must read' because it is the voices of people that were most impacted by the unlawful invasion of Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory in 2007 and how little it has really achieved in terms of improving the lives and well being of discrete and remote Aboriginal communities.

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        4.0

        An important book for all Australians

        By 

        from Alice Springs

        About Me Bookworm

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Deserves Multiple Readings
        • Easy To Read
        • Informative

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Reference

          This is a book which enlightens readers as to the injustices and discrimination carried out in the Northern Territory over recent years. The "Intervention" has turned back the clock and returned the indigenous population to the old days of excessive external control and loss of decision making and community and individual self-management.

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          Introduction by Rosie Scott

          Anita Heiss and I decided to publish an anthology gathering together some of Australia’s best writers and thinkers to analyse and illuminate one of the most invasive, puzzling and unprecedented actions by a government in Australian history – the2007 Intervention by the Howard Government.

          We think that these writers and Indigenous leaders will bring anew perspective and urgency to an issue that has remained largelyoutside the public radar.

          We believe that the basic premises of this intervention aredeeply flawed, resulting in a serious breach of human rights.

          It has never been fully debated nationally nor has there been significant consultation with the Indigenous communities most affected.

          In June 2007 Prime Minister John Howard announced after the tabling of the ‘Little Children are Sacred’ report, ‘It is a disgrace that a section of the Australian population,those little children should be the subject of serious sexual abuse.’

          A week or so later the Howard government staged a massive military and police Emergency Response costing $587 million, as outlined in the NT Emergency Response Act.

          This Act prescribed a number of drastic measures which appeared strangely irrelevant to their stated aim of combating child abuse. Some of these measures contravened the Racial Discrimination Act and several revolved around land use. Nowhere in this very extensive legislation was there a significant mention of a child or children.

          Since then there has been little or no change in the figures of child sexual offending in the Northern Territory.

          This extraordinary, costly and largely unexplained action has had immense and long-reaching effects on the very cornerstones of Indigenous community and identity. There has now been substantial evidence gathered that much of this change has been negative. As the Intervention has morphed into Stronger Futures for another ten years in a disgraceful bipartisan agreement, many commentators have been asking what the justification for this continuation is, given the alarming figures of increasing suicide rates, child health problems and unemployment.

          The fact is the real motives of this intervention have never been fully explained or justified and in spite of constant opposition by Indigenous communities, most significant Elders, peak human rights organisations as well as other Australians across a broad spectrum, the situation remains the same with only a few cosmetic touches.

          We have published the voices of the Elders and other Northern Territory Indigenous community leaders in their many communiques, media releases and statements issued throughout the period. As time goes on, the tone of these statements becomes angrier, more despairing and anguished as their very reasonable requests are simply ignored by the authorities and the Intervention is kept in place.

          We believe this collection of essays, fiction, poetry, and memoir by leading Australian writers and statements by the Elders will give a new perspective, power and clarity to an issue that will continue to be highly controversial. And most importantly, we believe the role of the writer in this instance is to make Australian readers think about the plight of other largely voiceless Australians.

          Many voices both Indigenous and non-Indigenous have been raised in eloquent protest against the Intervention ever since its first announcement by John Howard. Contrary to the carefully managed spin that there is deep disagreement within the Indigenous community, the fact is there is strong consensus about the Northern Territory Intervention amongst most experts, people on the ground and organisations.

          Most importantly, the majority of Elders and community leaders in the Northern Territory oppose it, some of whom have petitioned the United Nations. These include Rosalie Kunoth- Monks of Utopia, Djiniyini Gondarra of Galiwin’ku, Harry Nelson of Yuendumu, Djapirri Mununggirritj from Yirrikala, Yananymul Mununggurr from the Laynhapuy Homelands, Diane Stokes at Muckatty Station, Maurie Ryan and John Leemans at Kalkarindji, Reggie Wurridjal and Helen Williams at Maningrida, Joy White with the Larrakia mob in Darwin, Barbara and Walter Shaw in the Alice Springs Town Camps, Harry Nelson at Yuendumu, Dhanggal Gurruwiwi from Wallaby Beach and Matthew Dhulumburrk Gaykambayu from Ramingining, Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann of Nauiyu, Rachel Willika,Yalmay Yunupingu and George Gaymarani Pascoe of Milingimbi.

          Local groups like Stop the Intervention Collective, Sydney and Intervention Rollback Action Group, Alice Springs which have worked so hard to publicise the facts, organisations representative of local Indigenous people like Yolŋuw Makarr Dhuni, eminent Indigenous and non-Indigenous figures like Tom Calma, LowitjaO’Donoghue, the late Malcolm Fraser, Alastair Nicholson, Chris Graham and Olga Havnen as well as international organisations like the UN, Amnesty and church groups have all stated their strong opposition.

          One dissenting voice had a particularly powerful effect on me personally. Rachel Willika, a Jaowyn Elder from the remote community of Manyallaluk spoke at a protest meeting we at Women for Wik convened in 2007 in Sydney when news of the Intervention had broken. This meeting was chaired by Dr Anita Heiss and addressed by eminent Indigenous women we’d invited from the Territory. These women included Olga Havnen, the then national Indigenous leader from the newly formed Combined Aboriginal Organisations, Eileen Cummings, and former advisor to the Chief Minister of NT on Aboriginal and Women’s Affairs,her daughter Raylene Rosas and Rachel Willika. An emotional and attentive audience packed the hall and spilled out into the foyer.

          Rachel Willika had never been on a plane before, or to Sydney but she stood in front of us with quiet dignity and grace. Her speech was one of the most eloquent and powerful I’ve ever heard and moved many of the audience to tears. And, in my case anyway, to action. Her description of the fear in their community when the soldiers came has stayed with me permanently and so in partinspired this anthology.

          In a statement to The Guardian at around the same time shesaid, ‘That John Howard has no heart. This intervention is hurting Aboriginal families.’

          It is no coincidence that eloquent speech has the power to spur people to political action.And as always, writers, filmmakers, painters and other artistshave been major players in this history of analysis and dissent.

          There are some towering examples of this; The Swan Book by Alexis Wright and the movies Charlie’s Country by David Gulpilil, Our Generation, a superb documentary film by Sinem Saban and Damien Curtis, and John Pilger’s Utopia. All of these have received serious recognition, mostly internationally. David Gulpilil received a standing ovation and the prestigious prize for best actor in Un Certain Regard competition in Cannes, also winning best lead actor for the Australian Academy Cinema Television Arts awards. Charlie’s Country won best film and best director at the Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards. It’s safe to say this film will receive more awards.

          Our Generation was voted Best Campaign Film in the London International Documentary Festival, and Pilger’s Utopia was voted by the London Film Review as one of the five best films of the year. Alexis Wright’s critically acclaimed book, which I believe will become an Australian if not international classic, was shortlisted for all the major prizes including the Miles Franklin, the NSW Premiers, the Stella and the Voss. A review in the Sydney Morning Herald described The Swan Book as possibly ‘one of the most important Australian novels yet,’ another in the Sydney Review of Books ‘… and perhaps the first truly planetary novel.’

          Other more direct examples of eloquent voices raised are thoseof people like Rosalie Kunoth-Monks, Djiniyini Gondarra, Pat Dodson, Jeff McMullen, Tom Calma, Jon Altman, Judy Gurruwiwi, Barbara Shaw, Paddy Gibson, and many others. Their passionate speeches around Australia are a powerful example of inspiring oratory when all too often dumbed down, evasive, cliched and impenetrable bureaucratic language is the norm for the authorities defending the Intervention. These people are true Australian heroes. They spend many hours travelling around Australia speaking and campaigning about what the Intervention actually means to the people who are suffering through it.

          When we decided to compile this anthology we were delighted with the calibre of writers who agreed to contribute and felt very confident about putting our proposal forward to publishers. Six months later not one publisher took the project on, though mostsaid it was a great project with an excellent list. But thanks to heart-warming support from the community –a dedicated group of women, who called themselves Women Inspired to Action, or WITA for short, raised funds for us through crowd-funding – with generous contributions from people all over Australia; a generous grant from the CAL Cultural fund; keen interest and support from Michele Harris and the members of ‘concerned Australians’, an extraordinarily generous offer by Graeme Jones and Tracey Kirby of Kirby Jones to do our typesetting and design free, the committed work of Tara Wynn of Curtis Brown and people like Pamela Hewitt and Danny Vendramini who have donated their time and expertise; we have been able to continue with our plans to publish this book in 2015.

          So this is our hope for the anthology – that our distinguishedlist of Australian writers and Elders will join in with these other artists, supporters and community leaders to provide an indepth, eloquent and thoughtful dimension to this urgent debate, so long neglected by mainstream Australia.

          We believe that the truthfulness, clarity and passion of their language will provide an inspiring antidote to the spin and disinformation which has been the official language of the Intervention up until now.

          Above all we intend this anthology of eloquent Australian voices to take the debate to a wider audience and through this unique compilation prove that the abuse of human rights by the Northern Territory Intervention has no place in this country.

          The Intervention: an Anthology is an extraordinary document –deeply moving, impassioned, spiritual, angry and authoritative –it’s essential reading for anyone who wants to understand what lies behind this passionate opposition.
          Table of Contents

          ROSIE SCOTT Introduction 1

          ANITA HEISS We Are Many Nations But We Are One People. 7

          ROSALIE KUNOTH-MONKS Reflections on the Intervention – quotes between 2012 and 2014 14

          PAT ANDERSON The Intervention: Some Reflections 27

          RACHEL WILLIKA A statement 42

          DJINIYINI GONDARRA Quotes from Speeches on the Intervention 45

          P.M. NEWTON 567,000 kms Driven 50

          CHRISTINE OLSEN Crossing the Gap 56

          YINGIYA MARK GUYULA A Statement June 2011 60

          LARISSA BEHRENDT The Dialogue of Intervention 64

          NATALIE HARKIN Intervention: A poem 75

          DJINIYINI GONDARRA spokesperson, Response to the Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s announcement of a Second Intervention in the Northern Territory 26th June 2011 77

          DEBRA ADELAIDE Welcome to Country 79

          NICOLE WATSON From the Northern Territory Emergency Response to Stronger Futures – Where is the Evidence that Aboriginal Women are Leading Self-Determining Lives? 88

          JOHN LEEMANS spokesperson Media Release from the Gurindji 28th July 2011 103

          MELISSA LUCASHENKO What I Heard about the Intervention 106

          LIONEL FOGARTY Philosophies Exterminated: A poem 112

          DJINIYINI GONDARRA spokesperson for the independently established Yolŋuw Makarr Dhuni (Yolngu Nations Assembly) Statement 2011 114

          JEFF McMULLEN Rolling Thunder: Voices against Oppression 115

          NORTHERN TERRITORY ELDERS AND COMMUNITY REPRESENTATIVES Press Conference Statement Melbourne 4th November, 2011 139

          BRUCE PASCOE Bread 144 ALI COBBY ECKERMANN Four poems 154

          Intervention Payback 154 Unearth 157 A Parable 157 40 Year Leases JOHN LEEMANS spokesperson Gurindji people at Daguragu and Kalkaringi, Stronger Futures 11th June 2012 160

          BRENDA L. CROFT Signs of the Times 162

          RODNEY HALL The Constitutional Connection 179

          YOLGNU STATEMENT 24th June 2012 188

          SAMUEL WAGAN WATSON Intervention rouge 191

          YOLGNU NATIONS ASSEMBLY AND THE ALYWAAR NATION Media release 27th June 2012 193

          EVA COX The Intervention: An overview of bad policy and bad politics 195

          DENI LANGMAN A letter to the Politicians of Australia who will Debate the Stronger Futures Legislation, June 2012. 212

          ARNOLD ZABLE Where We Meet 214

          YALMAY YUNUPINGU Human Rights and Social Justice Award. Excerpts from her keynote speech 24 June 2014 228

          ALEXIS WRIGHT Be Careful about Playing with the Path of Least Resistance a short story 232

          YOLGNU MAKARR DHUNI Stronger Futures October 2013 245

          CONTRIBUTORS 247

          ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 261

          BIBLIOGRAPHY AND NOTES 265

          ISBN: 9780646937090
          ISBN-10: 064693709X
          Audience: Tertiary; University or College
          Format: Paperback
          Language: English
          Number Of Pages: 288
          Published: 1st July 2015
          Country of Publication: AU
          Dimensions (cm): 23.4 x 15.3
          Weight (kg): 0.5
          Edition Number: 1