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The Burgess Boys - Elizabeth Strout

Paperback

Published: 1st April 2014
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Haunted by the freak accident that killed their father when they were children, Jim and Bob Burgess escaped from their Maine hometown of Shirley Falls for New York City as soon as they possibly could. Jim, a sleek, successful corporate lawyer, has belittled his bighearted brother their whole lives, and Bob, a legal aid attorney who idolises Jim, has always taken it in his stride. But their long-standing dynamic is upended when their sister, Susan - the sibling who stayed behind - urgently calls them home. Her lonely teenage son, Zach, has got himself into a world of trouble, and Susan desperately needs their help. And so the Burgess brothers return to the landscape of their childhood, where the long-buried tensions that have shaped and shadowed their relationship begin to surface in unexpected ways that will change them forever.

About the Author

Elizabeth Strout's tenure as a lawyer (six months) was slightly longer than her career as a stand-up comedian (one night). She has also worked as a bartender, waitress and piano player at bars across the USA. She now teaches literature in New York, where she lives with her husband and daughter.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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The Burgess Boys
 
4.0

(based on 1 review)

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4.0

Deceptively complex

By 

from armidale nsw

About Me Bookworm

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Engaging Characters
  • Well Written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Gift
    • Older Readers

    Comments about The Burgess Boys:

    I enjoyed this work by Elizabeth Strout.
    The lives of ordinary people and the complexity of sibling relationships is thoughtfully explored.
    The understandings of migrant and refugee people in this small town of America is sensitively handles and often proves insightful.
    The poverty of some decisions and the consequences is somewhat breathtaking at times.

    Comment on this reviewHelp Icon

    'Strout's prose propels the story forward with moments of startlingly poetic clarity.' The New Yorker on The Burgess Boys 'As perfect a novel as you will ever read ... So astonishingly good that I shall be reading it once a year for the foreseeable future and very probably for the rest of my life' Evening Standard on Olive Kitteridge 'Strout animates the ordinary with astonishing force' The New Yorker on Olive Kitteridge 'Masterfully wrought' Vanity Fair on Olive Kitteridge 'Strout has a wonderful ability to turn a phrase...[these] pages hold what life puts in: experience, joy, grief, and the sometimes-painful journey to love' Observer on Olive Kitteridge 'I am deeply impressed. Writing of this quality comes from a commitment to listening, from a perfect attunement to the human condition, from an attention to reality so exact that it goes beyond a skill and becomes a virtue. I have never read her before and I knew within a few sentences that here was an artist to value and respect' -- Hillary Mantel on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Strout's best novel yet' -- Ann Pachett on My Name is Lucy Barton 'An exquisite novel... in its careful words and vibrating silences, My Name Is Lucy Barton offers us a rare wealth of emotion, from darkest suffering to - 'I was so happy. Oh, I was happy' - simple joy' Claire Messud, New York Times Book Review on My Name is Lucy Barton 'So good I got goosebumps... a masterly novel of family ties by one of America's finest writers' Sunday Times on My Name is Lucy Barton 'My Name is Lucy Barton confirms Strout as a powerful storyteller immersed in the nuances of human relationships... Deeply affecting novel...visceral and heartbreaking...If she hadn't already won the Pulitzer for Olive Kitteridge this new novel would surely be a contender' Observer on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Hypnotic...yielding a glut of profoundly human truths to do with flight, memory and longing' Mail on Sunday on My Name is Lucy Barton 'This is a book you'll want to return to again and again and again' Irish Independent on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Slim and spectacular...My Name Is Lucy Barton is smart and cagey in every way. It is both a book of withholdings and a book of great openness and wisdom. It starts with the clean, solid structure and narrative distance of a fairy tale yet becomes more intimate and improvisational, coming close at times to the rawness of autofiction by writers such as Karl Ove Knausgaard and Rachel Cusk. Strout is playing with form here, with ways to get at a story, yet nothing is tentative or haphazard. She is in supreme and magnificent command of this novel at all times...' Washington Post on My Name is Lucy Barton 'My Name Is Lucy Barton is a short novel about love, particularly the complicated love between mothers and daughters... It evokes these connections in a style so spare, so pure and so profound the book almost seems to be a kind of scripture or sutra, if a very down-to-earth and unpretentious one' Newsday on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Her concise writing is a masterclass in deceptive simplicity...Strout writes with an exacting rhythm, with each word and clause perfectly placed and weighted and each sentence as clear and bracing as grapefruit. It's a small masterpiece' Daily Mail on My Name is Lucy Barton 'This short, simple, quiet novel wriggles its way right into your heart and stays there' Red on My Name is Lucy Barton 'A beautifully taut novel' Guardian on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Agleam with extraordinary psychological insights...delicate, tender but ruthless reveries' Sunday Express on My Name is Lucy Barton 'An eerie, compelling novel, its deceptively simple language is a 'slight rush of words' which hold much more than they seem capable of containing...This novel is about the need to create a story we can live with when the real story cannot be told...' Financial Times on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Strout uses a different voice herself in this novel: a spare simple one, elegiac in tone that sometimes brings to mind Joan Didion's' The Tablet on My Name is Lucy Barton 'An exquisitely written story...a brutally honest, absorbing and emotive read' Catholic Universe on My Name is Lucy Barton 'This is a glorious novel, deft, tender and true. Read it' Sunday Telegraph on My Name is Lucy Barton 'Honest, intimate and ultimately unforgettable' Stylist on My Name is Lucy Barton 'One of those rare, invigorating books that take an apparently familiar world and peer into it with ruthless intimacy, revealing a strange and startling place.' The New York Times Book Review on Amy & Isabelle 'A novel of shining integrity and humour' -- Alice Munro on Amy and Isabelle

    Elizabeth Strout

    Elizabeth Strout was born in Portland, Maine, and grew up in small towns in Maine and New Hampshire.  From a young age she was drawn to writing things down, keeping notebooks that recorded the quotidian details of her days.  She was also drawn to books, and spent hours of her youth in the local library lingering among the stacks of fiction.  During the summer months of her childhood she played outdoors, either with her brother, or, more often, alone, and this is where she developed her deep and abiding love of the physical world: the seaweed covered rocks along the coast of Maine, and the woods of New Hampshire with its hidden wildflowers.


    During her adolescent years, Strout continued writing avidly, having conceived of herself as a writer from early on.  She read biographies of writers, and was already studying – on her own – the way American writers, in particular, told their stories.  Poetry was something she read and memorized; by the age of sixteen was sending out stories to magazines.  Her first story was published when she was twenty-six. 

     
    Strout attended Bates College, graduating with a degree in English in 1977.  Two years later, she went to Syracuse University College of Law, where she received a law degree along with a Certificate in Gerontology.  She worked briefly for Legal Services, before moving to New York City, where she became an adjunct in the English Department of Borough of Manhattan Community College.  By this time she was publishing more stories in literary magazines and Redbook and Seventeen.  Juggling the needs that came with raising a family and her teaching schedule, she found a few hours each day to work on her writing.

    Visit Elizabeth Strout's Booktopia Author Page


    ISBN: 9781471127380
    ISBN-10: 1471127389
    Audience: General
    Format: Paperback
    Language: English
    Number Of Pages: 352
    Published: 1st April 2014
    Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd
    Country of Publication: GB
    Dimensions (cm): 2.1 x 12.8  x 2.0
    Weight (kg): 0.27