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Shooting an Elephant : And Other Essays - George Orwell

Shooting an Elephant

And Other Essays

By: George Orwell, Jeremy Paxman (Introduction by)

Paperback

Published: 11th August 2003
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With a new Introduction by
Jeremy Paxman

'A writer who is still vividly contemporary ...... Orwell told the truth'
Christopher Hitchens

'Shooting an Elephant' is Orwell's searing and painfully honest account of his experience as a police officer in imperial Burma; killing an escaped elephant in front of a crowd 'solely to avoid looking a fool'. The other masterly essays in this collection include classics such as 'My Country Right or Left', 'How the Poor Die' and 'Such, Such were the Joys', his memoir of the horrors of public school, as well as discussions of Shakespeare, sleeping rough, boys' weeklies and a spirited defence of English cooking. Opinionated, uncompromising, provocative and hugely entertaining, all show Orwell's unique ability to get to the heart of any subject.


Why I writep. 1
The spikep. 11
A hangingp. 23
Shooting an elephantp. 31
Bookshop memoriesp. 41
Charles Dickensp. 49
Boys' weekliesp. 115
My country right or leftp. 149
Looking back on the Spanish warp. 157
In defence of English cookingp. 185
Good bad booksp. 189
The sporting spiritp. 195
Nonsense poetryp. 201
The prevention of literaturep. 207
Books v. cigarettesp. 227
Decline of the English murderp. 233
Some thoughts on the common toadp. 239
Confessions of a book reviewerp. 245
Politics v. literature : an examination of Gulliver's travelsp. 251
How the poor diep. 277
Such, such were the joysp. 291
Reflections on Gandhip. 347
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.
George Orwell

Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, an experience that inspired his first novel Burmese Days (1934). Several years of poverty followed. He lived in Paris for two years before returning to England, where he worked successively as a private tutor, schoolteacher and bookshop assistant, and contributed reviews and articles to a number of periodicals. Down and Out in Paris and London was published in 1933. In 1936 he was commissioned by Victor Gollancz to visit areas of mass unemployment in Lancashire and Yorkshire, and The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) is a powerful description of the poverty he saw there. At the end of 1936 Orwell went to Spain to fight for the Republicans and was wounded. Homage to Catalonia is his account of the civil war. He was admitted to a sanatorium in 1938 and from then on was never fully fit. He spent six months in Morocco and there wrote Coming Up for Air. During the Second World War he served in the Home Guard and worked for the BBC Eastern Service from 1941 to 1943. As literary editor of Tribune he contributed a regular page of political and literary commentary, and he also wrote for the Observer and later for the Manchester Evening News. His unique political allegory, Animal Farm, was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. George Orwell died in London in January 1950. A few days before, Desmond MacCarthy had sent him a message of greeting in which he wrote: 'You have made an indelible mark on English literature . . . you are among the few memorable writers of your generation.'

Visit George Orwell's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780141187396
ISBN-10: 0141187395
Series: Orwell Centenary Edition Ser.
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 400
Published: 11th August 2003
Dimensions (cm): 20.2 x 13.0  x 2.2
Weight (kg): 0.28
Edition Number: 1