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Roald Dahl's Completely Revolting Recipes : A Collection Of Delumptious Favourites :  And Other Tasty Treats! - Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl's Completely Revolting Recipes : A Collection Of Delumptious Favourites

And Other Tasty Treats!

Hardcover

Published: 25th November 2009
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A brilliant recipe book featuring 50 recipes from Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes and Even More Revolting Recipes in a delicious new format.

"NOSE-BAGS ON!"

"GRUB'S UP!"

A gloriumptious collection of favourite Roald Dahl recipes is here!

50 recipes in a delicious new format – from glumptious Green Pea Soup and wondercrump Wormy Spaghetti, to scrumdiddlyumptious Scrambled Dregs and bellypopping Butterscotch.

No Roald Dahl fan will want to be without this delumptious book.

Feeling hungry? How about some Snozzcumbers for a snack, or a Fresh Mudburger for dinner? Or perhaps you're in the mood for Stink Bugs' Eggs. Fans of Roald Dahl will recognise his peculiar culinary inventions from his many books – now, these dubious delights are collected all together in Roald Dahl's Revolting Recipes, a compendium of dishes that sound worse than they really are. Stink Bug Eggs, for example, are really devilled eggs with some food colouring and a special, added ingredient (parmesan cheese or asafetida) to make them particularly aromatic. Mr. Twit's Beard Food consists of mashed potatoes, hard–boiled eggs, mushrooms, and cocktail franks cunningly arranged. Each recipe is simple to make, many are delightfully disgusting to contemplate, but all are easy on the palate. Roald Dahl himself would have been delighted to eat these ravishingly revolting recipes.

The following is a sample recipe from this book:

Roald Dahl's Revolting Recipes Bruce Bogtrotter's Cake

In case you've forgotten, Bruce Bogtrotter was the little boy that stole a piece of chocolate cake from the Trunchbull in Matilda. As punishment, he then had to consume an entire cake in front of the whole school!

SERVES 1 TO 8!

YOU WILL NEED:

8 ½–inch round cake pan
wax paper
Pyrex bowl
large mixing bowl
sauce pan
wire rack

8 ounces good–quality semisweet chocolate
1 ½ sticks (12 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
¼ cup all–purpose flour
6 eggs, separated, yolks lightly beaten

ICING:

8 ounces good–quality semisweet chocolate
8 ounces heavy cream

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Line the cake pan with wax paper and butter the bottom and sides of the paper.

3. Melt the chocolate in a Pyrex bowl set in a saucepan of simmering water or in a microwave on low heat. Mix in the butter and stir until melted.

4. Transfer to a large bowl and add the sugar, flour, and lightly beaten egg yolks.

5. Whisk the egg whites until stiff. Gently fold half of the whites into the chocolate mixture, blending thoroughly, then fold in the remaining whites.

6. Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake for about 35 minutes. There will be a thin crust on top of the cake, and if tested with a toothpick the inside will appear undercooked (don't worry, the cake will get firmer as it cools). Remove from the oven, and let cool in the pan on a wire rack.

7. While the cake is cooling, make the icing. Melt the chocolate with the cream in a heavy–bottomed saucepan over lowest heat, stirring occasionally until the chocolate is fully melted and blended with the cream. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.

8. When the cake is cool enough to handle, remove it from the pan and discard the wax paper. The cake is prone to sinking slightly in the middle, so flip it upside down before icing by placing a plate on top and carefully turning over the cake pan and plate together.

9. Carefully spread the chocolate icing all over the cake with a spatula.

"If you've ever wondered how to whip up a batch of plushnuggets, nishnobblers or frobscottle, this fantastic recipe book will tell you all you need to know. Illustrated as always by Quentin Blake, this is the perfect gift for any Roald Dahl fan" -- Sarah Kingsford Sunday Express "In truth there's little here that's revolting ... but a lot that's a blast to make with the smaller people familiar with the text" -- Lyndon Hogg Bournemouth Daily Echo "No Dahl fan will want to be without this delumptious book" Malvern Gazette

Roald Dahl

When he was at school Roald Dahl received terrible reports for his writing - with one teacher actually writing in his report, 'I have never met a boy who so persistently writes the exact opposite of what he means. He seems incapable of marshalling his thoughts on paper!'

After finishing school Roald Dahl, in search of adventure, travelled to East Africa to work for a company called Shell. In Africa he learnt to speak Swahili, drove from diamond mines to gold mines, and survived a bout of malaria where his temperature reached 105.5 degrees (that's very high!).

With the outbreak of the Second World War Roald Dahl joined the RAF. But being nearly two metres tall he found himself squashed into his fighter plane, knees around his ears and head jutting forward. Tragically of the 20 men in his squadron, Roald Dahl was one of only three to survive. Roald wrote about these experiences in his books Boy and Going Solo.

Later in the war Roald Dahl was sent to America. It was there that he met famous author C.S. Forester (author of the Captain Hornblower series) who asked the young pilot to write down his war experiences for a story he was writing. Forester was amazed by the result, telling Roald 'I'm bowled over. Your piece is marvellous. It is the work of a gifted writer. I didn't touch a word of it.' (an opinion which would have been news to Roald's early teachers!). Forester sent Roald Dahl's work straight to the Saturday Evening Post. Roald Dahl's growing success as an author led him to meet many famous people including Walt Disney, Franklin Roosevelt, and the movie star Patricia Neal. Patricia and Roald were married only one year after they met!

The couple bought a house in Great Missenden called Gipsy House. It was here that Roald Dahl began to tell his five children made-up bedtime stories and from those that he began to consider writing stories for children.

An old wooden shed in the back garden, with a wingbacked armchair, a sleeping bag to keep out the cold, an old suitcase to prop his feet on and always, always six yellow pencils at his hand, was where Roald created the worlds of The BFG, The Witches, James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and many, many more.

Visit Roald Dahl's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780224083423
ISBN-10: 0224083422
Audience: Children
Format: Hardcover
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 128
Published: 25th November 2009
Publisher: Random House Children's Publishers UK
Dimensions (cm): 25.5 x 20.4  x 2.5
Weight (kg): 0.63