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Percy Jackson and the Sea of Monsters : Percy Jackson and the Olympians Series : Book 2 - Rick Riordan

Percy Jackson and the Sea of Monsters

Percy Jackson and the Olympians Series : Book 2

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Percy Jackson has had a quiet year. Not a single monster has set foot in his New York school. But when a game of dodgeball turns into a death match against a gang of ugly cannibal giants, things get well, ugly.

And then Percy's friend Annabeth brings more bad news: the magical borders that protect Camp Half-Blood have been poisoned, and the only safe haven for young demigods is under threat.

To save their camp, Percy and his friends must embark on a quest that will take them into the treacherous Sea of Monsters and a desperate fight for their lives . . .

About the Author

Rick Riordan is a teacher and a writer, and has won many awards for his mystery novels for adults. He says that the idea for Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief first came to him while he was teaching Greek mythology at middle school in San Francisco. But rumour has it that Camp Half Blood actually exists, and Rick spends his summers there recording the adventures of young demigods. Some believe that, to avoid a mass panic among the mortal population, he was forced to swear on the River Styx to present Percy Jackson's story as fiction. Rick lives in Texas (apart from his summers on Half Blood Hill) with his wife and two sons.

Praise for the Percy Jackson series: 'Witty and inspired. Gripping, touching and deliciously satirical...This is most likely to succeed Rowling. Puffin is on to a winner' - Amanda Craig, The Times 'Puns, jokes and subtle wit, alongside a gripping storyline' - Telegraph 'Perfectly paced, with electrifying moments chasing each other like heartbeats' - New York Times

My nightmare started like this.

I was standing on a deserted street in some little beach town. It was the middle of the night. A storm was blowing. Wind and rain ripped at the palm trees along the side walk. Pink and yellow stucco buildings lined the street, their windows boarded up. A block away, past a line of hibiscus bushes, the ocean churned.

Florida, I thought. Though I wasn't sure how I knew that. I'd never been to Florida.

Then I heard hooves clattering against the pavement. I turned and saw my friend Grover running for his life. Yeah, I said hooves.

Grover is a satyr. From the waist up, he looks like a typical gangly teenager with a peach-fuzz goatee and a bad case of acne. He walks with a strange limp, but unless you happen to catch him without his pants on (which I don't recommend), you'd never know there was anything unhuman about him. Baggy jeans and fake feet hide the fact that he's got furry hindquarters and hooves.

Grover had been my best friend in sixth grade. He'd gone on this adventure with me and a girl named Annabeth to save the world, but I hadn't seen him since last July, when he set off alone on a dangerous quest – a quest no satyr had ever returned from.

Anyway, in my dream, Grover was hauling goat tail, holding his human shoes in his hands the way he does when he needs to move fast. He clopped past the little tourist shops and surfboard rental places. The wind bent the palm trees almost to the ground.

Grover was terrified of something behind him. He must've just come from the beach. Wet sand was caked in his fur. He'd escaped from somewhere. He was trying to get away from . . . something.

A bone-rattling growl cut through the storm. Behind Grover, at the far end of the block, a shadowy figure loomed. It swatted aside a street lamp, which burst in a shower of sparks.

Grover stumbled, whimpering in fear. He muttered to himself, Have to get away. Have to warn them!

I couldn't see what was chasing him, but I could hear it muttering and cursing. The ground shook as it got closer. Grover dashed around a street corner and faltered. He'd run into a dead-end courtyard full of shops. No time to back up. The nearest door had been blown open by the storm. The sign above the darkened display window read: ST. AUGUSTINE BRIDAL BOUTIQUE.

Grover dashed inside. He dove behind a rack of wedding dresses.

Rick Riordan

For Rick Riordan, a bedtime story shared with his oldest son was just the beginning of his journey into the world of children’s books.

Already an award-winning author of mysteries for adults, Riordan, a former teacher, was asked by his son Haley to tell him some bedtime stories about the gods and heroes in Greek mythology. “I had taught Greek myths for many years at the middle school level, so I was glad to comply,” says Riordan. “When I ran out of myths, (Haley) was disappointed and asked me if I could make up something new with the same characters.”

At the time, Haley had just been diagnosed with ADHD and dyslexia. Greek mythology was one of the only subjects that interested the then second-grader in school. Motivated by Haley’s request, Riordan quickly came up with the character of Percy Jackson and told Haley all about “(Percy’s) quest to recover Zeus’s lightning bolt in modern-day America,” says Riordan. “It took about three nights to tell the whole story, and when I was done, Haley told me I should write it out as a book.”

Despite his busy schedule, Riordan managed to carve some time out of his daily routine to write the first Percy Jackson and the Olympians book, The Lightning Thief. And in deference to his son, Riordan chose to give the character of Percy certain attributes that hit close to home.

“Making Percy ADHD and dyslexic was my way of honouring the potential of all the kids I’ve known who have those conditions,” says Riordan. “It’s not a bad thing to be different. Sometimes, it’s the mark of being very, very talented. That’s what Percy discovers about himself in The Lightning Thief.”

Born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, Riordan started writing as a young adult. He wrote short stories, unsuccessfully submitted a few of those stories for publication, and edited his high school newspaper.

But he didn’t take writing seriously until after he graduated from college and was teaching in San Francisco. While Riordan and his family (wife Becky and sons Haley and Patrick) enjoyed living in California, he was nostalgic for Texas.

On an impulse, Riordan decided to try his hand at a mystery novel, which he set in his hometown of San Antonio. Featuring a private-eye/English Ph.D. named Tres Navarre, Big Red Tequila was published to rave reviews in 1997. Today, Riordan’s Tres Navarre series has won the top three awards for the mystery genre—the Edgar, the Anthony, and the Shamus.

Despite his success in the adult mystery market, writing for children was never far from Riordan’s mind. “Back when I taught middle school and wrote adult mysteries, my students often asked me why I wasn’t writing for kids,” says Riordan. “I never had a good answer for them. It took me a long time to realize they were right. Kids are the audience I know best.”

Young readers—in addition to reviewers, booksellers, librarians, and educators—agree. Kirkus, in a starred review, called The Lightning Thief “[a] riotously paced quest tale of heroism that questions the realities of our world, family, friendship and loyalty,” while Publishers Weekly praised The Sea of Monsters, book two in the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, as “a sequel stronger than (the) compelling debut,” containing “humour, intelligence and expert pacing.” Both titles in the Percy Jackson series have received accolades and awards, and The Lightning Thief has recently been optioned for a feature film.

“I think kids want the same thing from a book that adults want— a fast-paced story, characters worth caring about, humour, surprises, and mystery.”

And while it’s obvious that Riordan has a knack for writing for kids, he readily admits that writing for young readers is not that much different than writing for an older audience.

“I think kids want the same thing from a book that adults want—a fast-paced story, characters worth caring about, humour, surprises, and mystery,” says Riordan. “A good book always keeps you asking questions, and makes you keep turning pages so you can find out the answers.”

Recently, Riordan made a “reluctant” decision to leave teaching, a career he thoroughly enjoyed, to write full-time. However, he’s keeping his hand in education by conducting lots of author appearances in classrooms across the country, and even some in Europe.

“I love teaching,” says Riordan. “I love working with kids . . . maybe some day I’ll go back to the classroom. I’m not ready to say it’ll never happen. But for now, the books are keeping me very busy.”

(From Hyperion Books for Children)

Visit Rick Riordan's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780141319148
ISBN-10: 9780606236119
Series: Percy Jackson
Audience: Children
For Ages: 12 - 13 years old
For Grades: 8 - 9
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 288
Published: July 2007
Dimensions (cm): 19.8 x 13.1  x 1.8
Weight (kg): 19.2