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Mastering the Art of French Cooking - 2 x Books in 1 x Slipcased Boxed Set : Volumes 1 and 2 Paperback - Julia Child

Mastering the Art of French Cooking - 2 x Books in 1 x Slipcased Boxed Set

Volumes 1 and 2 Paperback

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This isn't just any cookery book. It is Mastering the Art of French Cooking, first published in 1961, and it's a book that is a statement, not of culinary intent, but of aspiration, a commitment to a certain sort of good life, a certain sort of world-view; a votive object implying taste and appetite and a little je ne sais quoi.

Julia Child was like Amelia Earhart, or Eleanor Roosevelt: she was a hero who'd gone out there and made a difference. Her books are a triumph, and also a trophy.
AA GILL - The Times

This fabulous slipcase contains books 1 & 2.

About the Author

Julia Child was born in Pasadena, California. She was graduated from Smith College and worked for the OSS during World War II in Ceylon and China, where she met Paul Child. After they married they lived in Paris, where she studied at the Cordon Bleu and taught cooking with Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle, with whom she wrote the first volume of Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961). In 1963, Boston's WGBH launched The French Chef television series, which made her a national celebrity, earning her the Peabody Award in 1965 and an Emmy in 1966. Several public television shows and numerous cookbooks followed. She died in 2004.

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Mastering the Art of French Cooking - 2 x Books in 1 x Slipcased Boxed Set
 
5.0

(based on 2 reviews)

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

It is a classic.

By Nick

from Sydney

About Me Avid Cook

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Easy To Understand
  • Great Ideas
  • Great Recipes
  • Informative

Cons

  • No Photos

Best Uses

  • Learning New Techniques
  • Reference
  • Trying New Dishes

Comments about Mastering the Art of French Cooking - 2 x Books in 1 x Slipcased Boxed Set:

This book is a classic, but that doesn't mean it isn't useful today. While it lacks pictures, it more than makes up for it with great recipes and clear, concise instructions.

There is a solid range of recipes from ones taking hours to prepare, to things you can whip up pretty quickly, and yet still be tasty. It makes a great introduction to french cooking.... but then, you probably already knew all of this...

Comment on this review

 
5.0

Excellent product & service. Thank you.

By Kitster

from Brisbane

About Me Casual Cook

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Great Recipes
  • Well Written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Becoming Inspired
    • Reference
    • Trying New Dishes

    Comments about Mastering the Art of French Cooking - 2 x Books in 1 x Slipcased Boxed Set:

    Great reference books

    Comment on this review

    Displaying reviews 1-2

    Back to top

    This isn't just any cookery book. It is Mastering the Art of French Cooking, first published in 1961, and it's a book that is a statement, not of culinary intent, but of aspiration, a commitment to a certain sort of good life, a certain sort of world-view; a votive object implying taste and appetite and a little je ne sais quoi. Julia Child was like Amelia Earhart, or Eleanor Roosevelt: she was a hero who'd gone out there and made a difference. Her books are a triumph, and also a trophy. AA GILL, The Times

    Roast Duck With Orange Sauce

    *Caneton à l'Orange

    One of the most well known of all the duck dishes, caneton à l' orange, is roast duck decorated with fresh orange segments and accompanied by an orange-flavored brown sauce. Its most important element is its sauce-a rich, strong, meaty, duck essence darkened with caramel, flavoured with wine and orange peel, and given a light liaison of arrowroot. You can and should prepare the sauce well ahead of time so that when the duck is roasted, the dish is within 2 to 3 minutes of being done.

    VEGETABLE AND WINE SUGGESTIONS
    Nothing should interfere with the flavours of the duck, the sauce, and the oranges. Sauteed or shoestring potatoes, or homemade potato chips are your best choice. Serve a good red Bordeaux-Medoc, or a chilled white Burgundy­Meursault, Montracher, or Corton-Charlemagne.

    For 5 or 6 people
    Note: Under the ingredients needed for the sauce are 2 cups of excellent duck stock. This should be prepared ahead of time, as it must simmer about 2 hours.

    Blanching the orange

    4 brightly colored navel oranges

    Remove the orange part of the skin in strips with a vegetable peeler. Cut into julienne (small strips 1/16 inch wide and 11/2 inches long). Simmer for 15 minutes in a quart of water. Drain. Pat dry in paper towels.

    Roasting the duck
    A 5 1/2-lb. ready-to-cook duckling
    1/2 tsp salt
    Pinch of pepper

    Season the duck cavity with salt and pepper, add a third of the prepared orange peel, and truss the duck. Roast it according to the master recipe, page 274.


    The sauce base
    A 4-cup saucepan
    3 Tb granulated sugar
    1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    2 cups strong, brown duck stock (follow directions for brown chicken stock, page 236, using duck giblets instead of chicken giblets)
    2 Tb arrowroot blended with 3 Tb port or Madeira
    The rest of the blanched orange peel

    While the duck is roasting, make a sweet-and-sour caramel coloring as follows: Boil the sugar and vine. gar over moderately high heat for several minutes until the mixture has turned into a mahogany-brown syrup. Immediately remove from heat and pour in 1/2 cup of the duck stock. Simmer for a minute, stirring, to dissolve the caramel. Then add the rest of the stock, beat in the arrowroot mixture, and stir in the orange peel. Simmer for 3 to 4 minutes or until the sauce is clear, limpid, and lightly thickened. Correct seasoning, and set aside.

    The orange segments
    The 4 oranges, skinned

    Cut the 4 oranges into neat, skinless segments and place in a covered dish.

    Final assembly

    When the duck is done, discard trussing strings, and set it on a platter. Place it in the turned-off hot oven, leaving the door ajar.

    1/2 cup port or Madeira

    Remove as much fat as you can from the roasting pan. Add the wine and boil it down rapidly, scraping up coagulated roasting juices and reducing the liquid to 2 or 3 tablespoons.

    The prepared sauce base 2 or 3 Tb good orange liqueur

    Strain the wine reduction into the sauce base and bring to the simmer. Stir in the orange liqueur by spoonfuls, tasting. The sauce should have a pleasant orange flavor but not be too sweet. Add drops of orange bitters or lemon juice as a corrective.

    Drops of orange bitters or lemon juice

    2 Tb softened butter

    Just before serving, and off heat, swirl in the butter enrichment, and pour the sauce into a warmed sauce-boat.

    Place a line of orange segments over the length of the duck and heap the rest at the two ends of the platter. Spoon a bit of sauce with peel over the duck, and serve.

    ISBN: 9780718156855
    ISBN-10: 0718156854
    Audience: General
    Format: Boxed, Slipcased or Casebound
    Language: English
    Number Of Pages: 1404
    Published: March 2010
    Dimensions (cm): 24.9 x 17.9
    Weight (kg): 24.9
    Edition Number: 1