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General Dourakine - Comtesse De Segur

General Dourakine

By: Comtesse De Segur, Stephanie Smee (Transcribed by)

Paperback

Published: 19th August 2013
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In this rollicking tale, the cantankerous but lovable General Dourakine brings his new-found French friends, Jacques and Paul, back to his grand estate in snowy Russia.

Life becomes complicated when the General’s niece, the grasping Madame Papofsky, and her eight unruly children descend on the house. Madame Papofsky is desperate to get her hands on her uncle’s enormous fortune.

Find out if the General – with some help from his friends – can extract himself from her greedy clutches in this sequel to A Room at Guardian Angel Inn.

About the Author

Sophie, Countess of Ségur (née Countess Sofiya Feodorovna Rostopchina; Saint Petersburg, 1 August 1799 - Paris, 9 February 1874) was a French writer of Russian birth.

She is best known today for her novel Les Malheurs de Sophie (Sophie's Misfortunes). The action takes place in a castle in the French countryside during the Second French Empire, where Sophie lives with her parents Mr and Mrs de Réan. Curious and adventurous, she does one silly thing after another, with the critical help of her cousin Paul, who is good and tries to show her the right path. She has two friends, Camille and Madeleine de Fleurville, 'good little girls' whom she tries hard to imitate. But she will learn that life is not a bed of roses...

It was in her father's salon that Sophie Rostopchine met Eugène Henri Raymond, Count of Ségur, whom she married on 13/14 July 1819. The marriage was largely an unhappy one: her husband was flighty, distant and poor (until being made a Peer of France in 1830), and his infrequent conjugal visits to their château des Nouettes produced eight children, including the father of the historian Pierre de Ségur (Eugène de Ségur is said to have called his wife "la mère Gigogne", or "Mother Gigogne" in reference to a theatre character of 1602, an enormous woman out of whose skirts a crowd of children appeared).

The Comtesse de Ségur wrote her first novel at the age of 58.

About the Translator

Stephanie Smee is a translator into English of all things literary and French.

Having worked as a lawyer in Sydney and London, Stephanie happily traded in a legal career for a return to her linguistic calling. After several years as a legal translator, she left the world of financing documents behind and made her literary translation début with a new English translation of the Countess de Ségur’s Fleurville Trilogy published in 2010 by Simon & Schuster (Australia). The Trilogy includes the perenially popular Sophie’s Misfortunes, first published in France in 1858 and in print ever since.

Her new translation of another of the Countess’ favourites, Memoirs of a Donkey was published at the end of 2011 (also known asMonsieur Cadichon: Memoirs of a Donkey), and she has one other in the works; and General Dourakine.

ISBN: 9781922052025
ISBN-10: 1922052027
Audience: Children
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Published: 19th August 2013
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Australia
Weight (kg): 0.4

Comtesse De Segur

Sophie, Countess of Ségur (née Countess Sofiya Feodorovna Rostopchina; Saint Petersburg, 1 August 1799 - Paris, 9 February 1874) was a French writer of Russian birth.

She is best known today for her novel Les Malheurs de Sophie ("Sophie's Misfortunes"). The action takes place in a castle in the French countryside during the Second French Empire, where Sophie lives with her parents Mr and Mrs de Réan. Curious and adventurous, she does one silly thing after another, with the critical help of her cousin Paul, who is good and tries to show her the right path. She has two friends, Camille and Madeleine de Fleurville, 'good little girls' whom she tries hard to imitate. But she will learn that life is not a bed of roses...

It was in her father's salon that Sophie Rostopchine met Eugène Henri Raymond, Count of Ségur, whom she married on 13/14 July 1819. The marriage was largely an unhappy one: her husband was flighty, distant and poor (until being made a Peer of France in 1830), and his infrequent conjugal visits to their château des Nouettes produced eight children, including the father of the historian Pierre de Ségur (Eugène de Ségur is said to have called his wife "la mère Gigogne", or "Mother Gigogne" in reference to a theatre character of 1602, an enormous woman out of whose skirts a crowd of children appeared).

The Comtesse de Ségur wrote her first novel at the age of 58.

Visit Comtesse De Segur's Booktopia Author Page