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Ethics:Theory and Practice : Theory and Practice - Thiroux

Ethics:Theory and Practice

Theory and Practice

By: Thiroux

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Jacques P. Thiroux first published ETHICS: THEORY AND PRACTICE in 1977 in order to educate readers about ethical theory and to have them apply what they learn to specific problems (e.g., taking human life; lying, cheating, stealing, and breaking promises; establishing ethical practices in business; honoring ethical obligations in medicine; and so on). Together with case studies written by the author, ETHICS: THEORY AND PRACTICE continues to provide students with a solid foundation in understanding classic and contemporary moral problems. New to Ethics: Theory and Practice, Eighth Edition! bull; bull;New sections on stem cell research, advanced health care, and the Enron scandal bull;Revised sections on terrorism in the wake of September 11, 2001 bull;Added material on care ethics and John Rawls's theory of justice bull;Companion Website trade; : FREE, online resource for students for further enrichment in ethics studies bull;ABC NEWS trade; Videos: FREE videos for instructional use on contemporary ethical issues (forthcoming)

"This text is perfect for students who have no background in philosophy." - Dr. Marlene San Miguel Groner, SUNY Farmingdale "I think the text is an excellent one. The information is well organized. Students can easily understand the different types of theories. The outlines at the end of each chapter are especially helpful ... Students with little or no background in ethics find it easy to understand and really appreciate the application of theories to real-world problems." - Beth Rene' Roepnack, DeVry University, Georgia

Prefacep. xi
What Is Morality?p. 1
Objectivesp. 1
What Is Philosophy and Ethics' Relationship to It?p. 2
Key Termsp. 2
Approaches to the Study of Moralityp. 6
Morality and Its Applicationsp. 8
Where Does Morality Come From?p. 13
Customary or Traditional and Reflective Moralityp. 17
Morality, Law, and Religionp. 18
Why Should Human Beings Be Moral?p. 24
Chapter Summaryp. 28
Exercises for Reviewp. 31
Discussion Questionsp. 32
Notesp. 33
Supplementary Readingp. 33
Consequentialist (Teleological) Theories of Moralityp. 35
Objectivesp. 35
Psychological Egoismp. 36
Ethical Egoismp. 38
Utilitarianismp. 43
Difficulty with Consequentialist Theories in Generalp. 48
Chapter Summaryp. 49
Exercises for Reviewp. 51
Discussion Questionsp. 52
Notesp. 53
Supplementary Readingp. 53
Nonconsequentialist (Deontological) Theories of Morality and Virtue Ethicsp. 55
Objectivesp. 55
Act Nonconsequentialist Theoriesp. 56
Rule Nonconsequentialist Theoriesp. 59
General Criticisms of Nonconsequentialist Theoriesp. 66
Virtue Ethicsp. 68
Conclusionsp. 74
Chapter Summaryp. 74
Exercises for Reviewp. 78
Discussion Questionsp. 79
Notesp. 81
Supplementary Readingp. 81
Absolutism versus Relativismp. 83
Objectivesp. 83
The Meanings of Absolutep. 84
The Meanings of Relativep. 85
Cultural Relativism and Cultural Absolutismp. 85
Propositions and Truthp. 87
Conclusionp. 94
Chapter Summaryp. 96
Exercises for Reviewp. 97
Discussion Questionsp. 98
Notesp. 99
Supplementary Readingp. 99
Freedom versus Determinismp. 101
Objectivesp. 101
The Meaning of Determinismp. 102
Types and Theories of Determinismp. 102
Fatalism and Hard and Soft Determinismp. 108
Indeterminismp. 110
Criticisms of Hard Determinism and Arguments for Freedomp. 111
Conclusion: Soft Determinismp. 114
Chapter Summaryp. 115
Exercises for Reviewp. 118
Discussion Questionsp. 118
Notesp. 119
Supplementary Readingp. 119
Reward and Punishmentp. 121
Objectivesp. 121
Definition of Key Termsp. 122
Reward and Punishment in Relationship to Justicep. 122
Elements of Justicep. 123
Rewardp. 124
Theories of How to Rewardp. 130
Punishmentp. 131
Theories of Punishmentp. 133
Is a Synthesis Possible?p. 143
Chapter Summaryp. 145
Exercises for Reviewp. 150
Discussion Questionsp. 150
Notesp. 151
Supplementary Readingp. 151
Setting Up a Moral System: Basic Assumptions and Basic Principlesp. 153
Objectivesp. 153
Conflicting General Moral Issuesp. 154
Basic Assumptionsp. 155
Basic Principles, Individual Freedom, and Their Justificationp. 160
Priority of the Basic Principlesp. 170
A General Way of Determining Priority--Two Categoriesp. 170
How the System of Humanitarian Ethics Worksp. 174
Conclusionp. 175
Chapter Summaryp. 177
Exercises for Reviewp. 178
Discussion Questionsp. 179
Notep. 179
Supplementary Readingp. 179
The Taking of Human Lifep. 181
Objectivesp. 181
The Taking of Human Lifep. 182
Suicidep. 182
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 185
Defense of the Innocent (the Self Included)p. 186
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 187
Warp. 188
Terrorismp. 191
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 192
Capital Punishmentp. 193
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 198
Chapter Summaryp. 199
Exercises for Reviewp. 202
Views of Major Ethical Theories on the Taking of Human Lifep. 203
Suicidep. 203
Defense of the Innocentp. 205
War and Terrorismp. 206
Capital Punishmentp. 208
Reader Reactionsp. 210
Notesp. 210
Supplementary Readingp. 210
Allowing Someone to Die, Mercy Death, and Mercy Killingp. 213
Objectivesp. 213
Definition of Termsp. 214
Current Legal Status of Mercy Death and Mercy Killingp. 215
Allowing Someone to Diep. 217
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 245
Mercy Deathp. 247
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 255
Mercy Killingp. 256
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 259
Chapter Summaryp. 261
Exercises for Reviewp. 265
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Allowing Someone to Die, Mercy Death, and Mercy Killingp. 266
Notesp. 266
Supplementary Readingp. 267
Abortionp. 269
Objectivesp. 269
Introduction to the Abortion Issuep. 270
When Does Human Life Begin?p. 273
Arguments Against Abortionp. 275
Arguments for Abortionp. 279
The More Moderate Positions on Abortionp. 283
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 287
Chapter Summaryp. 288
Exercises for Reviewp. 291
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Abortionp. 292
Notesp. 292
Supplementary Readingp. 293
Lying, Cheating, Breaking Promises, and Stealingp. 295
Objectivesp. 295
Introductionp. 296
Definitions of Key Termsp. 296
Nonconsequentialist and Consequentialist Viewsp. 297
Lyingp. 299
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 306
Cheatingp. 307
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 310
Breaking Promisesp. 311
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 316
Stealingp. 317
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 321
Chapter Summaryp. 322
Exercises for Reviewp. 325
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Lying, Cheating, Breaking Promises, and Stealingp. 326
Notesp. 326
Supplementary Readingp. 327
Morality, Marriage, and Human Sexualityp. 329
Objectivesp. 329
Major Aspects of Human Sexualityp. 330
The Meaning and Purposes of Human Sexualityp. 330
Premarital Sexp. 335
Sex in Marriage-Type Relationships (Including Nonlegal)p. 333
Masturbationp. 346
Pornographyp. 347
Prostitutionp. 349
Sexual Perversion or "Unnatural" Sexual Activityp. 350
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 351
Chapter Summaryp. 352
Exercises for Reviewp. 358
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Morality, Human Sexuality, and Marriagep. 359
Notesp. 359
Supplemetary Readingp. 359
Bioethics--Ethical Issues in Medicinep. 362
Objectivesp. 362
Introduction and Definition of Termsp. 363
Health Care Professionals and Patients and Their Families--Rights and Obligationsp. 363
Truth Telling and Informed Consentp. 368
Confidentialityp. 373
Guilt and Innocence in Treating Patientsp. 374
Ethical Issues in Medicinep. 375
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 380
Chapter Summaryp. 382
Exercises for Reviewp. 389
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Bioethical Issuesp. 390
Notesp. 390
Supplementary Readingp. 391
Business and Media Ethicsp. 394
Objectivesp. 394
Introductionp. 395
Rights and Obligations in Businessp. 395
Two Ways of Approaching Rights and Obligations in Businessp. 396
The Moderate Positionp. 398
Justice, Truth Telling, and Honesty in Businessp. 399
Ethical Issues in Businessp. 400
Sexual Harassmentp. 406
Media Ethicsp. 409
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 413
Chapter Summaryp. 417
Exercises for Reviewp. 423
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Business and Media Ethicsp. 424
Notesp. 424
Supplementary Readingp. 424
Environmental Ethicsp. 426
Objectivesp. 426
Key Termsp. 427
Nature and Moralityp. 427
Environmental Ethical Issuesp. 428
Our Attitude Toward Nature and What Lies Behind itp. 430
Arguments for Use and Exploitation of the Natural Environmentp. 433
Arguments Against the Use and Exploitation of Naturep. 434
Moderate Positionp. 436
Criteria for Animal Rightsp. 436
Ways of Dealing with Animal Rightsp. 429
Use of Animals for Foodp. 438
Use of Animals for Experimentationp. 440
Killing Animals for Sportp. 441
Protection of Endangered Speciesp. 444
Conclusionp. 444
Cases for Study and Discussionp. 445
Chapter Summaryp. 447
Exercises for Reviewp. 452
Views of the Major Ethical Theories on Environmental Ethicsp. 452
Notesp. 453
Supplementary Readingp. 443
Appendixesp. 455
Introductionp. 455
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to the Moral Problems of the Taking of Human Lifep. 456
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to the Moral Problems of Allowing Someone to Die, Mercy Death, and Mercy Killingp. 467
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to the Moral Problems of Abortionp. 476
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to the Moral Problems of Lying, Cheating, Breaking Promises, and Stealingp. 487
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to the Moral Problems of Human Sexualityp. 496
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to Moral Problems in Medicine (Bioethics)p. 502
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to Moral Problems in Business (Business and Media Ethics)p. 550
Applying Humanitarian Ethics to Environmental Ethicsp. 517
Glossaryp. 522
Indexp. 533
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780131830028
ISBN-10: 0131830023
Audience: Professional
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Published: July 2003
Dimensions (cm): 23.5 x 17.5  x 2.2
Weight (kg): 0.776