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War in the Boardroom : Why Left-Brain Management and Right-Brain Marketing Don't See Eye-to-Eye--and What to Do About It - Al Ries

War in the Boardroom

Why Left-Brain Management and Right-Brain Marketing Don't See Eye-to-Eye--and What to Do About It

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Published: 6th October 2009
Format: ePUB
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Renowned business gurus Al and Laura Ries give a blow-by-blow account of the battle between management and marketing—and argue that the solution lies not in what we think but in how we think

There's a reason why the marketing programs of the auto industry, the airline industry, and many other industries are not only ineffective, but bogged down by chaos and confusion.

Management minds are not on the same wavelength as marketing minds.

What makes a good chief executive? A person who is highly verbal, logical, and analytical. Typical characteristics of a left brainer.

What makes a good marketing executive? A person who is highly visual, intuitive, and holistic. Typical characteristics of a right brainer.

These different mind-sets often result in conflicting approaches to branding, and the Ries' thought-provoking observations—culled from years on the front lines—support this conclusion, including:

  • Management deals in reality. Marketing deals in perception.
  • Management demands better products. Marketing demands different products.
  • Management deals in verbal abstractions. Marketing deals in visual hammers.

Using some of the world's most famous brands and products to illustrate their argument, the authors convincingly show why some brands succeed (Nokia, Nintendo, and Red Bull) while others decline (Saturn, Sony, and Motorola). In doing so, they sound a clarion call: to survive in today's media-saturated society, managers must understand how to think like marketers—and vice versa. Featuring the engaging, no-holds-barred writing that readers have come to expect from Al and Laura Ries, War in the Boardroom offers a fresh look at a perennial problem and provides a game plan for companies that want to break through the deadlock and start reaping the rewards.

“[M]arketing folks should learn to speak in left-brain terminology. The book is a good place to start lessons. Examples are well-explained and down-to-earth. As for managers, even the most logical and analytical types should be able to see the reasoning behind ‘marketing sense.’”

Ch. 1. Management deals in reality. Marketing deals in perception -- Ch. 2. Management concentrates on the product. Marketing concentrates on the brand -- Ch. 3. Management wants to own the brand. Marketing wants to own the category -- Ch. 4. Management demands better products. Marketing demands different products -- Ch. 5. Management favors a full line. Marketing favors a narrow line -- Ch. 6. Management tries to expand the brand. Marketing tries to contract the brand -- Ch. 7. Management strives to be the "first mover." Marketing strives to be the "first minder." -- Ch. 8. Management expects a "big-bang" launch. Marketing expects a slow takeoff -- Ch. 9. Management targets the center of the market. Marketing targets one of the ends -- Ch. 10. Management would like to own everything. Marketing would like to own a word -- Ch. 11. Management deals in verbal abstractions. Marketing deals in visual hammers -- Ch. 12. Management prefers a single brand. Marketing prefers multiple brands -- Ch. 13. Management values cleverness. Marketing values credentials -- Ch. 14. Management believes in double branding. Marketing believes in single branding -- Ch. 15. Management plans on perpetual growth. Marketing plans on market maturity -- Ch. 16. Management tends to kill new categories. Marketing tends to build new categories -- Ch. 17. Management wants to communicate. Marketing wants to position -- Ch. 18. Management wants customers for life. Marketing is happy with a short-term fling -- Ch. 19. Management loves coupons and sales. Marketing loathes them -- Ch. 20. Management tries to copy the competition. Marketing tries to be the opposite -- Ch. 21. Management hates to change a name. Marketing often welcomes a name change -- Ch. 22. Management is bent on constant innovation. Marketing is happy with just one -- Ch. 23. Management has the hots for multimedia. Marketing is not so sure -- Ch. 24. Management focuses on the short term. Marketing focuses on the long term -- Ch. 25. Management counts on common sense. Marketing counts on marketing sense.

ISBN: 9780061973130
ISBN-10: 0061973130
Audience: General
Format: ePUB
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 304
Published: 6th October 2009