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Down and Out in Paris and London - George Orwell

Down and Out in Paris and London

Paperback

Published: 11th February 2013
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George Orwell's vivid memoir of his time living among the desperately poor and destitute, "Down and Out in Paris and London" is a moving tour of the underworld of society from the author of "1984", published with an introduction by Dervla Murphy in "Penguin Modern Classics". 'You have talked so often of going to the dogs - and well, here are the dogs, and you have reached them.' Written when Orwell was a struggling writer in his twenties, it documents his 'first contact with poverty'. Here, he painstakingly documents a world of unrelenting drudgery and squalor - sleeping in bug-infested hostels and doss houses of last resort, working as a dishwasher in Paris' vile 'Hotel X', surviving on scraps and cigarette butts, living alongside tramps, a star-gazing pavement artist and a starving Russian ex-army captain. Exposing a shocking, previously-hidden world to his readers, Orwell gave a human face to the statistics of poverty for the first time - and in doing so, found his voice as a writer. Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory "Animal Farm" was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of "Nineteen Eighty-Four" (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. All his novels and non-fiction, including "Burmese Days" (1934), "Down and Out in Paris and London" (1933), "The Road to Wigan Pier" (1937) and "Homage to Catalonia" (1938) are published in "Penguin Modern Classics". If you enjoyed "Down and Out in Paris and London", you might like "Homage to Catalonia", also available in "Penguin Modern Classics". "Orwell was the great moral force of his age". ("Spectator"). "The white-hot reaction of a sensitive, observant, compassionate young man to poverty". (Dervla Murphy).

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4.0

(based on 1 review)

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4.0

Well written, unsure it's 'me'

By Monz

from Wellington, NZ

About Me Everyday Reader

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Easy To Read
  • Well Written

Cons

  • A Bit Slow
  • Not What I Expected

Best Uses

    It's my first venture into Orwell, I'm not sure what I think yet from reading this book. I was expecting it to be a lot more interesting... or something. But, well written and I am still interested in reading other titles from Orwell.

    Comment on this review

    The white-hot reaction of a sensitive, observant, compassionate young man to poverty -- Dervla Murphy Orwell was the great moral force of his age Spectator

    George Orwell

    Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, an experience that inspired his first novel Burmese Days (1934). Several years of poverty followed. He lived in Paris for two years before returning to England, where he worked successively as a private tutor, schoolteacher and bookshop assistant, and contributed reviews and articles to a number of periodicals. Down and Out in Paris and London was published in 1933. In 1936 he was commissioned by Victor Gollancz to visit areas of mass unemployment in Lancashire and Yorkshire, and The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) is a powerful description of the poverty he saw there. At the end of 1936 Orwell went to Spain to fight for the Republicans and was wounded. Homage to Catalonia is his account of the civil war. He was admitted to a sanatorium in 1938 and from then on was never fully fit. He spent six months in Morocco and there wrote Coming Up for Air. During the Second World War he served in the Home Guard and worked for the BBC Eastern Service from 1941 to 1943. As literary editor of Tribune he contributed a regular page of political and literary commentary, and he also wrote for the Observer and later for the Manchester Evening News. His unique political allegory, Animal Farm, was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. George Orwell died in London in January 1950. A few days before, Desmond MacCarthy had sent him a message of greeting in which he wrote: 'You have made an indelible mark on English literature . . . you are among the few memorable writers of your generation.'

    Visit George Orwell's Booktopia Author Page


    ISBN: 9780141393032
    ISBN-10: 0141393033
    Audience: General
    Format: Paperback
    Language: English
    Number Of Pages: 224
    Published: 11th February 2013
    Dimensions (cm): 18.1 x 11.1  x 1.3
    Weight (kg): 0.14
    Edition Number: 1