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Caedmon's Song - Peter Robinson

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A psychological thriller from the author of the bestselling Inspector Banks series.

'A long, oily blackness punctuated by quick, vivid dreams . . . They were all just dreams. She couldn't possibly see these things, could she? Her eyes were closed. And if they really happened, then she would have screamed out from the pain, wouldn't she?'

On a balmy June night, Kirsten, a young university student, strolls home through a silent moonlit park. Suddenly her tranquil mood is shattered as she is viciously attacked. When she awakes in hospital, she has no recollection of that brutal night. But then, slowly and painfully, details reveal themselves: dreams of two figures, one white and one black, hovering over her; wisps of a strange and haunting song; the unfamiliar texture of a rough and deadly hand . . .

In another part of England, Martha Browne arrives in Whitby, posing as an author doing research for a book. But her research is of a particularly macabre variety. Who is she hunting with such deadly determination? And why?

About the Author

His first novel, Gallows View introduced Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks. It was short-listed for the John Creasey Award in the UK. Banks reappeared in his next three novels: A Dedicated Man; A Necessary End; and The Hanging Valley. The fifth Inspector Banks novel, Past Reason Hated, won the Crime Writers of Canada's Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel in 1992 while the sixth in the series, Wednesday's Child, was nominated for both the CWC Award and the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award.

Peter Robinson's award-winning series continued with: Dry Bones that Dream; Innocent Graves; Dead Right; In a Dry Season; Cold is the Grave; Aftermath; and The Summer that Never Was. His fourteenth novel staring Detective Chief Inspector Banks was Playing With Fire.

Caedmon's Song, published in September 2003, was his first departure from the series, and was followed up with Not Safe After Dark - Peter's first collection of stories to be published. It features Innocence, winner of the Crime Writer of Canada's Best Short Story Award.

Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire but now lives in Toronto, Canada.

ISBN: 9780330455473
ISBN-10: 9780802852410
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 328
Published: 1st June 2007
Dimensions (cm): 17.7 x 11.1

Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson, who emigrated to Canada in 1974, is best known for his novels featuring Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks of the Eastvale Criminal Investigation Department, Yorkshire, England. In addition, Robinson has published several non-series novels, among them the psychological thriller Caedmon's Song and a police procedural set primarily in Los Angeles, No Cure for Love. In each case, Robinson combines what might be called "psychological realism," or a focus on character and motivation, with thoughtful cultural commentary, particularly with respect to post-Thatcher England and its susceptibility to the values, tastes, and practices of urban America.

Robinson's Inspector Banks series is built around the character of Alan Banks and the quiet, methodical, and ruminative way in which he sets about solving crimes in the Yorkshire Dales with the assistance of his investigative team. Banks is relatively new to the Dales, having recently transferred from London in search of (ironically, given the number of murders that fall his way) a quieter professional life. He is married to an independent woman he genuinely enjoys and who challenges rather than acquiesces to him. A consummate family man, Banks runs miniature trains for relaxation, relishes his Sunday beef with Yorkshire pudding, and mourns his children's adolescent trajectory away from hearth and home. He enjoys a good working partnership with his superior, Detective Superintendent Gristhorpe, a gritty Yorkshireman who struggles to replicate the ancient technology of dry stone wall-building on his Dales farm. In employing cool logic, honed instinct, and sheer doggedness in pursuing his inquiries, and in avoiding violence for the most part, Inspector Banks is very much the classic police investigator—which is not surprising, given Robinson's acknowledgment of writers like Simenon, Maigret, and Christie as early influences upon his work.

Visit Peter Robinson's Booktopia Author Page